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14

Yoshke is simply a Yiddish diminutive nickname for Yehoshua (Joshua, for which a parallel English nickname would be Josh). Thus, it was simply a way for European Jews to make reference to Jesus in a manner that (a) conveyed the idea that Jesus was not viewed as important and (b) not likely to be picked up on by nearby Gentiles. I doubt there is any record ...


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


13

Edits in italics: Balashon blog discusses it at length here, and provides many sources, as well as a look at one example of it by various Rishonim. I have added some content from there during this edit. K-P-R is used throughout the Bible to mean wiped away or covered up, which are similar to what a denial does; it wipes away or covers up a fact. This ...


11

It seems that according to scholars of history it isn't, though, on a theological level, Hebrew represents the primary language with which Hakadosh Barukh Hu (God) communicates. Perhaps we can say that Hebrew is therefore the spiritual root of all languages. Hebrew belongs to the Canaanite group of languages. In turn the Canaanite languages are a ...


11

According to this article, it is from the Medieval German word, Gottvater (godfather).


11

Welhelm Gesenius suggests in his Hebrew Dictionary of Tanach that the word derives from the Coptic saht (woven) + nuje (false). He also notes the Septuagent's rendering κίβδηλος (spurious). A pdf of the dictionary page can be found here. Ibn Ezra already notes in his commentary to Vayikra 19:19 that the word is a dis legomenon and as such we can't know for ...


11

From TheSanhedrin.org: Etymologically, Sanhedrin is a late Hebrew representation of the Greek word synedrion συνέδριον meaning "sitting together" as a legislative assembly or Senate.


11

A few possibilities. Ezra 1:9 מחלפים. Rashi says that מחלפים is knives and it comes from בית החלפות where the knives were kept in the Bais Hamikdash. Even Ezra and Metzudas David in Ezra 1:9 also translate מחלפים as knives. Metzudas David says the word is used for knives at you are changing the animal from life to death. מחליפים את הבהמה מחיים למיתה ...


10

Jastrow supports Yishai's answer, that "סנהדרין" derives from the Greek συνέδριον: ‎‫סַנְהֶדְרִין,‬ ‫סַנְהֶדְרֵי‬ f. (also pl.) (συνέδριον) Sanhedrin, the supreme council of the Jews; ס‫'‬ גדולה the Great S., consisting of seventy-one members; ס‫'‬ קטנה the Small S., a judicial court of twenty-three. Snh. I, 6. Ib. ראויה לס‫'‬ fit to be a seat of the S....


9

The earliest source1 seems to be from the ספר הפליאה - ספר הקנה who writes: ויש פירושים רבים שנעלמו מעיני כל חי ועתיד אליהו הנביא לפרשם וזהו מה שרמזו רז"ל בשבעה מסכתות תיקו "תשבי "יתרץ "קושיות "ובעיות. 1Before 1390, according to linked Wikipedia article


8

A search on Hebrewbooks yields the following earlier (16th-century) uses of the Hebrew סברת הכרס: Radvaz, teshuvah 1463: זו סברת הכרס היא Yam Shel Shlomo, Gittin 4:28: וכל אחד עושה לו סברת הכרס כמו שיחפוץ ...and I'm sure there are others too. Considering that Radvaz lived nowhere near any Yiddish speakers, I doubt that the Hebrew is a calque of the ...


8

Jastrow (page 375) on the word ותיק: And then from Vatikin as a description of the men who did this -> the practice. I think Mishnaic Hebrew, with a comparison to Arabic and Biblical Hebrew.


8

On a simple level, Shechina refers to the manifestation of G-dliness that can be perceived even by created beings. To quote a letter from the Lubavitcher Rebbe: Nevertheless, G-d desired that the divine influences upon creation... and the divine immanence in the world should also include elements that the human mind can comprehend. […] This aspect ...


8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


8

From Webster Dictionary Latin tropus, from Greek tropos turn, way, manner, style, trope, from trepein to turn First Known Use: 1533 The most common Hebrew term I have heard for this is טעמי המקרא. Interesting to note that both terms seem to focus on different aspects of what "trope" is or does. The Latin root has a definition meaning "style", and ...


7

Berahot 34b Shabbat 65b Yoma 86b Sanhedrin 31b There probably are more though. As to why, the original is Baal Teshuva. So why did Rabenu Yona write Ben Teshuva is the real question, no?


7

Etymonline gives it as from Russian латка, "pastry", which may have come eventually from Ancient Greek ἐλαία, "olive" (or maybe it means modern Greek ελαία, "olive". I'm not sure).


7

We see that G-d calls it "Chag HaMatzot" and we call it "Chag HaPesach". G-d calls it Chag HaMatzot (In the Torah) to express praise of the Jews. They left Egypt with only some dough, so great was their faith in G-d. G-d calls it Chag HaMatzot to celebrate that fact. The Jews call it "Chag HaPesach" to celebrate the fact that G-d passed over the Jews ...


7

There's a Sefer by that name from 90 years ago - תרפג/1923. A search of HebrewBooks.org seems to show that the term was not used [much] earlier. A search of Toras Emeth Software indicates that it's not used in any of the classics (Mishna, Gemara, Rambam, Shulchan Aruch) and the earliest it finds is from the קיצור ש''ע ילקוט יוסף - the 2nd half of the 20th ...


7

In maseches Sanhedrin chapter one, mishna 6, the word is presented as sanhedrei. The Tiferes Yisroel #43 quotes the Aruch who writes this is the Latin version of the name. He also quotes the Maharil as saying Chazzal chose this word because in notrikin it stands for Sonei Hadras Din. The actual words of the Maharil are found in the Likutei Maharil #6 אמר ...


7

I too was always bothered as to the origins of this word, until I saw the following Midrash Lekach Tov on Parshas Beha'aloscha: ומהו לשון סנהדרין, סין זה תורה שניתנה מהר סיני, הדרין שמהדרין התורה במדרשה ומיפים ומישרין הכתוב זה עם זה-"What is the meaning of the term 'Sanhedrin'? 'Sin' refers to the Torah which was given from Mount 'Sin'ai, 'hadrin': since ...


7

The Ibn Ezra (cited by the Malbim as being in Parshas Bo, but I assume he means to refer to his comments to Shemos 3:15) explains that ה' צבא-ות refers to Hashem being the upholder of the צבא השמים. The Radak to Yeshaya 6:3 says that it refers to the armies on High and below. The Malbim to Yeshaya 6:3 (you can see it here), in explaining the line ק' ק' ק' ...


7

Linguistically, either there is no connection, or they are closely related, depending on which root you decide is being employed. Ernest Klein's Etymological Dictionary (page 654) has 2 separate words spelled שיח. One is "speak, talk, converse" and is traced to the Arabic (was diligent) and is also spelled with a samech. The other means a shrub, traced to ...


6

The term clearly occurs all over Rambam's Laws of Teshuva. For instance in 2:1 הוא בעל תשובה גמורה I don't know about earlier usages. But Rambam's code played a very strong influence on a lot of how we name things, so it doesn't surprise me that it won out. (Another interesting one is the phrase "Korban Pesach" ["Passover sacrifice."]) In the Talmud it'...


6

Aruch Hashulchan, Even Haezer 129, writes (in my own loose translation with uncertain translations marked with question marks in brackets [thus?]): [We spell the name] "יחיאל". And some are nicknamed "מיכל", so we write [in a get] "יחיאל, who's nicknamed מיכל". Even though מיכל is a [non-nick name?], like "מיכל בת שאול" and like "מיכל מים", still and all, ...


6

The word mahzor means "cycle" (the root Ħ-Z-R means "to return"). It is applied to the festival prayer book because the festivals recur annually. from Wikipedia


6

According to Sanhedrin 38a: Rab Judah also said in Rab's name: The first man spoke Aramaic,18 for it is written, How weighty are thy thoughts unto me, God.19 And that is what Resh Lakish meant when he said: What is the meaning of the verse, 'This is the book of the generations of Adam?20 It is to intimate that the Holy One, blessed be He, showed him [...


6

Those that were helped were included in the booklet (Pinkas). http://he.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D7%9B%D7%95%D7%9C%D7%9C_%D7%90%D7%91%D7%A8%D7%9B%D7%99%D7%9D ביישוב הישן, המונח כולל שימש לציין ארגוני חסד ובעיקר 'חברה' (או כיום מעין עמותה) שאליה השתייכה קבוצה מאורגנת, בדרך כלל מעיר או ארץ מוגדרת. יהודי חוץ לארץ תרמו להחזקת הכוללים, כדי לממן את ישיבתם של ...


6

Per Gemara Yevamos 5: it is Roshei taivos for שוע טווי ונוז. The Even Ezra translates Shatnez as mixture. http://www.ou.org/torah/article/kilayim_9_7-8 וראיתי לאחד מרבותינו שפירש שוע טווי הצמר לבד והפשתים לבד, ונוז כלומר ואח"כ נוז דהיינו שניהם ארוגים יחד


6

The source given there, Otzar Midrashim, is an anthology of midrashic works from different periods. In this case, the information comes from a work entitled Divrei ha-Yamim le-Moshe Rabbeinu, which is of unknown date and authorship, but at any rate predates the Aruch (11th century - beginning of the era of the Rishonim), which quotes this etymology (under s....


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