6

Check out the Peirush Chai on Masechta Succah here - it is a really helpful sefer to best illustrate the cases that come throughout the masechta.


5

According to Rabbi Prof. Yoel Elitzur in his essay on this question, the Bavli's understanding seems to come from the list of cities in Divrei Hayamim, where it says, for example (1:6:42): "וְלִבְנֵי אַהֲרֹן נָתְנוּ אֶת עָרֵי הַמִּקְלָט אֶת חֶבְרוֹן וְאֶת לִבְנָה וְאֶת מִגְרָשֶׁיהָ וְאֶת יַתִּר וְאֶת אֶשְׁתְּמֹעַ וְאֶת מִגְרָשֶׁיהָ" While in ...


3

Although there is no canonical cycle accepted by all, many traditional Yeshivas have a cycle involving the following tractates: יבמות כתובות נדרים גיטין קידושין בבא קמא בבא מציעא בבא בתרא Some Yeshivos (primarily in Eretz Yisroel) also do: סנהדרין מכות פסחים סוכה Brisk style Yeshivos generally focus on Kodshim oriented mesechtos: זבחים מנחות ...


3

Both the Mesivta and Veshinantam Gemaras have color plates in the back that illustrate these and many other things throughout the masechta. (The ones from Veshinantam are also available on the Daf Yomi Portal, under ללמוד ולהבין > תמונות עזר. You can also go to http://daf-yomi.com/Search.aspx?publisher=14 and see the complete list of their illustrations, ...


2

If there are less than 4 amos of invalid sechach (but not air) between the top of the wall and the valid sechach, halocho lemoshe misinai considers the invalid sechach as an extension of the wall (dofen akumah = bent wall) and the sukkah remains kosher although one cannot use the sukkah under the invalid sechach. (see here for more details.)


2

I think the truth is in the middle. It is fair to say that the presence of a machlokes shows there was no halacha l'Moshe miSinai, or else there could not be an argument. And in cases of argument, every Rabbi's ruling is binding on his community. However, the cases of arguments generally were in specific details, while the basic halacha was accepted. The ...


2

Why was Hebrew NOT the spoken language of the Jewish people after the Mishna? I have seen people say that it was an attempt to stop daily usage of hebrew and turn it into a language used exclusively for religious purposes. There is an assumption here that Hebrew was the spoken language in the time of the Mishna. The Gemara (Sotah 49b) seems to indicate ...


1

Why was Hebrew NOT the spoken language of the Jewish people after the Mishna? Similar to why Yiddish and Ladino ceased being the common spoken languages among the majority of Jews after WWII. They were surrounded by Aramaic speakers . Pretty much all of Mesopotamia spoke Aramaic, so even if you were Jewish you had to speak it in everyday existence to do ...


1

The Maharal (Derech Chayim, 5, 23) writes that the notion of Aramaic being the common vernacular at that time is tenable as to why the Talmud Bavli was written in Aramaic, however with regard to the Talmid Yeushalmi, where the primary language was Hebrew, such an answer is unsatisfactory. On a much greater scale, we find Aramaic in the Torah itself (...


1

There are a few options that I can think of: Koren Publishers write here: Subscribers to the hardcover edition will receive each volume in advance of the Daf and an email containing a link to download the PDF. Each PDF contains the side-by-side English-Aramaic translation and commentary by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz and color images. Vilna page not included. ...


1

In regards to question C, the Ben Yohada on that Gemara states that we would indeed learn the bad behavior as well, which is exactly why we needed to have the Torah and not leave it with just the animal kingdom: אִלְמָלֵי לֹא נִתְּנָה תּוֹרָה לְיִשְׂרָאֵל, לָמַדְנוּ צְנִיעוּת מֵחָתוּל וְכוּ'. הנה מלשון זה יש לדייק דעכשיו דנתנה תורה אין לנו ללמוד מאלו, וקשה ...


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