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16

You're most likely looking for Oifen Pripitchik. See it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkS3cZntDTY The lyrics are brought in the WikiPedia article in both Yiddish and English Translation.


10

In a letter to the Tog–Morgn Zhurnal, February 24, 1961 (also printed in דרשות און כּתובֿים), Rav Yosef Dov Halevi Soloveitchik wrote that Yiddish can be considered as a tashmish kedusha. He says that he doesn't believe that the language has inherent worth, but since it has been used over many years (and is still used) to learn Torah, and since "it was ...


9

פּראָבעה is apparently a Yiddish word meaning "test" or "tryout". See Google Translate. I don't actually speak Yiddish, but the etymology is probably from German Probe (approximately pronounced probuh, per Wiktionary), with the same meaning. It is related to the English probe, with both deriving from Latin probare. I can't answer for historical usage.


9

From Webster Dictionary Latin tropus, from Greek tropos turn, way, manner, style, trope, from trepein to turn First Known Use: 1533 The most common Hebrew term I have heard for this is טעמי המקרא. Interesting to note that both terms seem to focus on different aspects of what "trope" is or does. The Latin root has a definition meaning "style", and ...


9

The Gemara in Shabbos 113a–b interprets the passuk in Yishaya 58 ודבר דבר - שלא יהא דבורך של שבת כדבורך של חול. דבור - אסור, הרהור - מותר Your manner of speech on shabbos should not be the same as the week. speech is forbidden, but thinking is permitted. Rashi says it means no discussing business: שלא יהא דבורך של שבת כדבורך של חול — כגון מקח וממכר ...


8

A Grammen is a kind of song Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! The tune is simple so you can sing a long Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! It doesn't really matter if you put too many syllables into a line Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! You can put in a billion and it will still be fine! Da Na Da Na Da Na Na!


8

This is from an old Jewish Polish folk tale. A man's house is too crowded, so the rabbi tells him to bring in all his animals, one species at a time. When there are no more to being in, he tells him to take them all out. All of a sudden, the house feels so much roomier, despite staying exactly the same. Links: http://www.amazon.com/It-Could-Always-Be-Worse/...


7

To add to the other (correct) answers, it is indeed a Yiddish word (פּראָבע), and Weinreich's dictionary translates it as "test, tryout; assay; hallmark; probation; rehearsal". In addition, it has אױף פּראָבע (af probe) meaning "as a test; on trial", which neatly fits into the OP's context. Beinfeld and Bochner's dictionary adds the phrase מאַכן פּראָבע (...


7

it is from the common European word for 'examine, test, prove, try', originally from the Latin word probare (infinitive - 'to try, etc.') and late latin proba (noun for proof, whence our English word 'proof'). It gives us the English word probe, probation (trial, proof, demonstration). It has taken on the meaning 'audition' because the chazan/rabbi is trying ...


7

The question is predicated on a joke which you missed or which wasn't properly explained. One of the grandsons of Esav was named Nachas, as we see in Bereishit 36:13: וְאֵלֶּה בְּנֵי רְעוּאֵל, נַחַת וָזֶרַח שַׁמָּה וּמִזָּה; אֵלֶּה הָיוּ, בְּנֵי בָשְׂמַת אֵשֶׁת עֵשָׂו. And these are the sons of Reuel: Nahath, and Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah. These were the ...


6

While Isaac lays out the common claim of Levi Yitzchok Berditschever (as well as the fallacy thereof) he doesn't go farther back. Per the author of the Treasures of Ashkenaz blog, the authorship question for Gott von Avrohom goes further back than the birth of Chassidus, being rishonic in nature. While the individual who first composed a vernacular techinah ...


5

It means curled/twisted up and stuck behind your ears. I have geknipte peyos.


5

Rav Yehudah Aryeh Dunner of Bnei Brak in his שאלות המצויות - ח"ג עמ' קז quotes Rav Shmuel Vosner ZTL that the reason this phrase was added was because the words המקום ינחם אתכם are in future tense, and thus may sound like one is telling the avel (mourner) that he should be consoled in the future too. Therefore the minhag was to add this wish (in yiddish or ...


5

From Yiddish Dictionary Online: גראַם - m. gram - rhyme. Thus, גראַמען would mean to rhyme. This is, of course, just a partial answer. [To the tune of "Yankee Doodle":] Nasty Haman in Shushan, Haman HaAgagi Tried to bake some hamentashen but they turned out soggy. Mordechai, keep it up, don't go to the party Ride on horseback through the streets ...


5

Well, seeing that no-one else has answered so far... I don't know about Hassidic Yiddish specifically but the standard textbook for learning Yiddish is Weinreich's "College Yiddish". I'm sure there are many helpful resources online; I would start with YIVO and WikiBooks. Once you've got some basics and you want to practice, you can check out Der Forvetz, ...


5

I got it in camp many years ago and someone tried to fix the words that got cut off it's not perfect and it's not so clear as you mentioned it was photocopied too many times


5

The various spellings are trying to get at a vowel-less pronunciation of the final syllable: the syllabic n (for example, some English dialects pronounce "button" as "but'n", with a syllabic n at the end). From Uriel Weinreich's dictionary, in the section on non-YIVO-standard orthography: a superfluous ע is sometimes written before final ל or ן to mark ...


5

Alexander Harkavy writes in his Yiddish-English-Hebrew Dictionary (1928 edition) that מאַלע /male/ (which with a "weak lamed" is /malye/) is a backformation from מלכּה /malke/ (which means queen), since מלכּה sounds like a diminutive (the suffix /-ke/ often denotes diminutives). However, Max Weinreich cites Dov Sadan as suggesting that מאַליע /malye/ = ...


4

You might start with yiddishpop.com. If you want to learn the Lubavitcher Rebbe's sichos in Yiddish, a program that presupposes very little Yiddish knowledge is Back 2 Basics Sichos. Some of the content seems to be available for free here. There is a Yiddish translation of the Chumash written in very clear, everyday (not lomdish) language by Yehoyesh (...


4

you might find this sheet helpful they pass it around the Mir yeshiva for guys who dont know yiddish the pronunciations are in litveshe' havarah though...


4

According to this forum post here, the song is called "גראמען לכבוד חדש אדר" - "Rhymes in honor of the month of Adar" ("Gramen" means "rhymes" in Yiddish) and these are the lyrics: גראמען לכבוד חדש אדר לכבוד פורים קודש לכבוד דעם הייליגען חודש חודש אדר שמרבים בו בשמחה וועל איך זינגען א זמר לקיים מה שנאמר ...


4

I went looking for instances of "hamentash" (המן־טאַש) in Sholom Aleichem stories because I wanted to see it used in a sentence as singular and plural. In the story "Two Shalachmones or A Purim Scandal" the word is used 12 times, but every single usage is singular. It is consistently spelled המן־טאַש or "hamentash". You can find the first instance on page ...


4

YMMV, but the Previous Lubavitcher Rebbe wrote that there was a "Pierre Louis" (an assimilated Jew from France) who visited Harki. The town was Chassidic, and it happened that one of the townsmen visited the Baal Shem Tov in the interim. The Baal Shem Tov then instructed Rabbi Nissan to go to Pierre Louis and tell him that he was of Jewish descent; that ...


4

It literally means "a festive Purim". The words "I wish you" that should accompany it are missing but if you want to say it in proper English then "I wish you a festive Purim" would do the job. Google Translate has "A happy Purim". Maybe you need to cast lots to decide which to use. (Purim means "lots").


4

You must be talking about the song אויפן פריפעטשיק (Oyfn Pripetshik). The lyrics are listed below (according to the version sung by Ester Ofarim): .אויפן פריפעטשיק ברענט א פייערל, און אין שטוב איז הייס .און דער רבי לערנט קליינע קינדערלעך דעם אלף-בית .זעט זשע קינדערלעך געדענקט זשע טייערע, וואס איר לערנט דא !זאגט זשע נאך א מאל און טאקע נאך א מאל: קמץ-אלף - א ...


4

According to vocabulary.com, it is a Yiddish word of Slavic origin akin to "nebohy," Czech for "wretched;" & "niebożę", Polish for "poor creature" (see also nieborak).


4

See here that פּולווער is gunpowder and here and here that it was common in some communities to light firecrackers on Simchat Torah.


4

This is from Kehot Publishing. It is called Siddur Korban Mincha. The prayers are not in Yiddish, but it has a running Yiddish commentary. It is according to nusach Chabad. http://store.kehotonline.com/prodinfo.asp?number=HP-SKM Additionally,this is the siddur Tehilat HaShem translated to Yiddish at hebrewbooks.org. You could download the PDF or read it ...


3

Rabbi Hillel Lichtenstein wrote Eis Laasos volume 1 & volume 2 in Yiddish.


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