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18

Leib (as well as Label, Leibush and Loeb) is the Yiddish version of the German Name Loeb which means Lion (from the German for lion, Löwe). The English equivalent of this name is often Leo or Leon which are root in the Latin word for lion, leo. [Source: Kolatch, Alfred J. 1984. The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew First Names. Middle Village: ...


17

Having grown up "heimish" I will do my best to explain. The first thing I tell people that ask me to define Heimish, is "mixed up". From the outside looking in, our accent in davening is typically that of chassidim, yet we (For the most part) are clean shaven (which is a huge no-no in the chassidish world). You might see us wear a gartel on shabbos (...


16

You're most likely looking for Oifen Pripitchik. See it here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkS3cZntDTY The lyrics are brought in the WikiPedia article in both Yiddish and English Translation.


13

I'm surprised to read the other answers provided, not to mention the direction of the question leading to those answers. I didn't know what to expect when I clicked on the title, but it wasn't that. I have personally never heard the word in any context other than, simply, "friendly". As in: "This is a Heimish Shul" (not as a denomination, but just ...


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


11

According to this article, it is from the Medieval German word, Gottvater (godfather).


10

The word Heimish means comfortable. So to a Litvak another Litvak is Heimish and to a Chassid another Chassid is Heimish.


9

Leib is the Yiddish word for lion (aryeh).


9

Nitel Nacht is the eve of the non-Jewish holiday celebrating the birth of the Nazarene (see Divrei Yatziv O.C.2 240:1). According to some Nitel is associated with the Latin for being born, nacht of course meaning "night". (Nitei Gavriel on Nittel 1:2, see also Halichos Chaim, Moadim u'Zmanim, nittel 1 note 2). December 25th for the Eastern Church falls out ...


9

The word "shtender" (שטענדער) is Yiddish, and it's usually translated as "stander," although a more correct translation would be "lectern." It's an object used to prop up your books at an angle, and allow for easier reading. Some models are designed to be placed on a desk, and others, like the one pictured below, are for people who prefer to stand. Jews ...


9

According to Alexander Beider's Handbook of Ashkenazic Given Names (which, though well-researched, I haven't found to be entirely accurate for some individual names), the name Tsherne is borrowed from the Czech Christian name "Crne" (and Cernice, Crnohna, etc.) which comes from the word černa, meaning "black." Jews took the Czech name with them as they ...


9

Rav Mirsky in his first volume of Hegyonei Halacha has an interesting article on Ameilah shel Torah and includes the virtues of a bear. In speaking about how important 'toil' in learning is (rather than rote learning) he brings a Radak on Hosea (13:8): .אֶפְגְּשֵׁם כְּדֹב שַׁכּוּל, וְאֶקְרַע סְגוֹר לִבָּם; וְאֹכְלֵם שָׁם כְּלָבִיא, חַיַּת הַשָּׂדֶה ...


8

I like "preemptively address".


8

"Anticipate" is exactly the word I would use. "Preempt" takes second place. (These might not be exact translations -- but hey, did you ever try to translate the word mechutan?)


8

A search on Hebrewbooks yields the following earlier (16th-century) uses of the Hebrew סברת הכרס: Radvaz, teshuvah 1463: זו סברת הכרס היא Yam Shel Shlomo, Gittin 4:28: וכל אחד עושה לו סברת הכרס כמו שיחפוץ ...and I'm sure there are others too. Considering that Radvaz lived nowhere near any Yiddish speakers, I doubt that the Hebrew is a calque of the ...


8

From Webster Dictionary Latin tropus, from Greek tropos turn, way, manner, style, trope, from trepein to turn First Known Use: 1533 The most common Hebrew term I have heard for this is טעמי המקרא. Interesting to note that both terms seem to focus on different aspects of what "trope" is or does. The Latin root has a definition meaning "style", and ...


8

This is from an old Jewish Polish folk tale. A man's house is too crowded, so the rabbi tells him to bring in all his animals, one species at a time. When there are no more to being in, he tells him to take them all out. All of a sudden, the house feels so much roomier, despite staying exactly the same. Links: http://www.amazon.com/It-Could-Always-Be-Worse/...


8

The Gemara in Shabbos 113a–b interprets the passuk in Yishaya 58 ודבר דבר - שלא יהא דבורך של שבת כדבורך של חול. דבור - אסור, הרהור - מותר Your manner of speech on shabbos should not be the same as the week. speech is forbidden, but thinking is permitted. Rashi says it means no discussing business: שלא יהא דבורך של שבת כדבורך של חול — כגון מקח וממכר ...


8

In a letter to the Tog–Morgn Zhurnal, February 24, 1961 (also printed in דרשות און כּתובֿים), Rav Yosef Dov Halevi Soloveitchik wrote that Yiddish can be considered as a tashmish kedusha. He says that he doesn't believe that the language has inherent worth, but since it has been used over many years (and is still used) to learn Torah, and since "it was with ...


7

Etymonline gives it as from Russian латка, "pastry", which may have come eventually from Ancient Greek ἐλαία, "olive" (or maybe it means modern Greek ελαία, "olive". I'm not sure).


7

OK, I may have enough of an idea to offer an answer. I think the panel in the upper right is supposed to say כינור שפילט, like "harpist" or something in Yiddish. The upper middle seems to say something about a harp. The upper left says מאנדלן, Yiddish for almonds. I think the lower right might be א ליד, "a song." The lower middle says "baa..." I don't know ...


7

According to Alexander Beider's Handbook of Ashkenazic Given Names, Dov didn't become a name in "the vernacular life" until the 20th century. "Jews called Dov in Hebrew sources were actually named Ber in their everyday life." Ber, on the other hand, comes form the German Bero which has been known since the 8th century among non-Jews. Beider's theory is ...


7

A Grammen is a kind of song Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! The tune is simple so you can sing a long Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! It doesn't really matter if you put too many syllables into a line Da Na Da Na Da Na Na! You can put in a billion and it will still be fine! Da Na Da Na Da Na Na!


7

פּראָבעה is apparently a Yiddish word meaning "test" or "tryout". See Google Translate. I don't actually speak Yiddish, but the etymology is probably from German Probe (approximately pronounced probuh, per Wiktionary), with the same meaning. It is related to the English probe, with both deriving from Latin probare. I can't answer for historical usage.


7

The question is predicated on a joke which you missed or which wasn't properly explained. One of the grandsons of Esav was named Nachas, as we see in Bereishit 36:13: וְאֵלֶּה בְּנֵי רְעוּאֵל, נַחַת וָזֶרַח שַׁמָּה וּמִזָּה; אֵלֶּה הָיוּ, בְּנֵי בָשְׂמַת אֵשֶׁת עֵשָׂו. And these are the sons of Reuel: Nahath, and Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah. These ...


6

This is the end of verse 31:11 from Yirmiyahu.


6

Etymonline seems to be essentially correct. Two other sources discussed in Balashon's article here describe the journey a little more explicitly: Yiddish latke, from either Russian latka or Ukrainian oladka, both derived (I assume) from Old Russian оладья, olad'ya. This is then apparently derived from the Greek ελαδια, eladia, "olive-y things", ultimately ...


6

it is from the common European word for 'examine, test, prove, try', originally from the Latin word probare (infinitive - 'to try, etc.') and late latin proba (noun for proof, whence our English word 'proof'). It gives us the English word probe, probation (trial, proof, demonstration). It has taken on the meaning 'audition' because the chazan/rabbi is trying ...


6

To add to the other (correct) answers, it is indeed a Yiddish word (פּראָבע), and Weinreich's dictionary translates it as "test, tryout; assay; hallmark; probation; rehearsal". In addition, it has אױף פּראָבע (af probe) meaning "as a test; on trial", which neatly fits into the OP's context. Beinfeld and Bochner's dictionary adds the phrase מאַכן פּראָבע (...


5

To corroborate @YDK's comment, it seems to be from Basya (or Bisya): http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/489777/jewish/What-does-the-name-Pessy-mean.htm


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