15

Not a letter from the Gaon, exactly, but a personal instruction to that effect. The story is that one day, in the Yeshiva in Baghdad, they were debating the meaning of the phrase שמן ראש אל יני ראשי (Tehillim 141:5). Rav Hai Gaon instructed R' Matzliach ibn al-Bazak, later a dayan in Sicily and one of the teachers of R' Nassan Baal HaAruch, to ask the local (...


3

The Medrash Rabbah brings Rebbi Yitzchak who writes that Lavan was a pardachsus. According to the Sefer Ha'Aruch's understanding of the word Pardachsus Lavan was extremely white (albino) .


2

Besides for the answer @Chatzkel brought, I'm aware of two other answers: As I wrote in that answer of mine that @DoubleAA linked in the comments, there are some commentators - such as the student of Rasag and Rabbi Yehudah Hachassid and his father (see here for sources) - that hold that the conquests of Yair and Novach took place centuries before the later ...


2

I'm not sure how you can read it in a positive way? Perhaps you can add to your question to make it clearer what you mean. However as far as understanding the use of the letter "ב" it is worth noting the Ibn Ezra who writes the following: לא תענה. שנים רבות חפשתי בלבי טעם זאת המלה לאמר עד שקר ולא אמר עדות שקר. ולפי דעתי עתה כי הוא מדבר עם עד שקר. ...


1

[Chabad.org]on Eikev 11:2 translates this as And you shall know this day; that [I speak] not with your children, who did not know and who did not see the chastisement of the Lord, your God, His greatness, His mighty hand, and His outstretched arm, Rashi says And you shall know this day: Set your attention to know, understand, and accept my reproof. that ...


1

The Da'as Zekeinim writes that it is Moshe talking to the parents who witnessed everything: כי לא את בניכם. כלו' אינם ראוים ליענש ככם על המצות שהרי אתם ראיתם את מוסר ה' ואת גדלו ולא לפטור הבנים בא: כי לא את בניכם, “that it was not your children;” Moses warns his own generation that it was they who would be punished for ignoring the laws of the Torah, as it ...


1

My opinion. The Torah doesn't begin with "God spoke to Moses saying:..." because Moses didn't need to exist according to the Torah. The Torah does not seem to take for granted that everything that happens was intended to happen. Somethings are definitely foreshadowed and prophecies are given, but that isn't true for everything. Case in point is ...


1

Ben Tzion Luria in his essay in Hebrew "Ancient Chapters" in Sefer Yosef Breslevski, pg. 206, footnote 41, suggests that there was a Midianite tribe named the "Cushim" or the "Cushanim" (yes, perhaps as in Cushan Rish'ataim1). This word as the name of a tribe appears already in the Mari texts of the 19th century - it's possible ...


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