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36

I had never heard of this claim before. It certainly doesn't fit with everything I understand about Judaism. The Wikipedia article on Uzair (Qur'anic Arabic for Ezra, apparently) contains a great deal of interesting information about this claim in the Qur'an, including why it's incompatible with actual Jewish beliefs and some suppositions about how it got ...


33

According to the Rambam in the Guide of the Perplexed "Whenever it is possible to interpret the words of an individual in such a manner that they confirm to a being whose existence has been demonstrated, this is the conduct that is more fitting and most suitable for an equitable man of excellent nature." Even though I'm certain this will be controversial, ...


29

Assuming we all exist, think, know and interact with our actual surroundings etc. The Ontological Proof The first class of Divine Proof is the Ontological proof. It goes basically like this: God as a concept is perfect. Perfect things must have the quality of existing, else they wouldn't be perfect. Hence, God exists. Problems This doesn't really ...


29

Questions relating to God's omnipotence were discussed at length by the Rishonim in the Middle Ages in such great works as Saadia Gaon's "Emunos V'deos", Rambam's "Moreh Nevuchim", Ralbag's "Milchemes Hashem", and others. The consensus among them (in opposition to the authorities cited in @HodofHod's answer) is that God cannot violate the rules of logic. ...


28

To my knowledge, the only "argument" for the existence of God given in the Torah itself is that He directly revealed Himself to us at Sinai: Deut. 4:35 "Unto thee it was shown, that thou mightest know that the LORD, He is God; there is none else beside Him." Deut. 5:4, "The LORD spoke with you face to face in the mount out of the midst of the fire." ...


23

This is really the most fundamental and important question on this site. But in my opinion, the other answers here have not done this justice by any stretch. They make it seem simple, and they may make us feel good, that we're really right, but in reality it's not so easy to show why Judaism is true, let alone prove it with certainty to "be sure" Judaism is ...


22

Among the classical Torah commentators, there are those that interpret that whole Garden of Eden story as being literal historical fact, while others interpret it allegorically. The main authority who treats it as allegory is Rambam in Moreh Nevuchim (Volume 2, Chapter 30), and according to his interpretation, the snake represents a person's "appetitive ...


20

There is no sufficient evidence to prove this concept in one direction or another, and there never will be. I will try explain why. I am not sure where to begin, so I will just do an info dump of points which hopefully will be sufficient, because this is a complicated topic. Monolatrism is a made up word used to try to discredit Judaism and Christianity. ...


20

This kind of question is addressed by Maimonides in his Guide for the Perplexed (3:15), in which he states that we cannot ascribe to God the ability to do that which is impossible, thus, "it is impossible that God should produce a being like Himself, or annihilate, corporify, or change Himself. The power of God is not assumed to extend to any of these ...


19

No. This concept is completely foreign to Judaism. The other religion mentioned derived the concept from paganism, not Judaism.


19

The Talmud in Megila (10b) relates: When the Egyptians were drowning in the sea, the angels wanted to sing God's praises. God silenced them, saying "My handiwork is drowning in the sea, and you want to sing?" This strongly implies that God loves all of His creations.


19

Yes. Belief in God is axiomatic to Judaism. Jewish prayer features, at least twice a day, every day, the Shema, a compact assertion of this belief from Deuteronomy 6:4: Hear, O Israel: the LORD our God, the LORD is one. Jews traditionally teach this prayer to our children almost starting at birth. I strongly suspect that almost any Jew with any ...


17

In the Moreh Nevuchim, Rambam explains how God's attributes should be understood without compromising God's unchangingness. He compares God's mood to a fire. If you put ice in a fire, it melts, then evaporates. If you put clay in a fire, it hardens. If you put wood in a fire it burns... The fire causes many different and contrasting effects without changing ...


17

According to some Jewish authorities, especially Kabbalists and Chassidic Rebbes, G-d does not have to obey the rules of logic, since they are just another creation of His. As I wrote to a similar question: As the Creator of all things, including, but not limited to, time, the "laws" of physics, logic, and existence itself, G-d is not bound by any of them....


17

In general, don't try to obtain your knowledge of Judaism from episodes of Arthur or from fiction stories. People make things up in the interest of the story. There are much better, and more accurate, sources for learning about Judaism. Yes, in general, it is considered not a good thing for a Jewish person to practice another religion. But in terms of the ...


16

The Midrash Mishnat R. Eliezer (which is the source of the term חסידי אומות העולם, and for the Rambam's controversial definition thereof) says about this: חסידי אומות העולם, כיון שהן עושין שבע מצוות שנצטוו בני נח עליהן, הן וכל דקדוקיהן, הן נקראים חסידים. בד"א כשעושין אותן ואומרין, מכח שצוה אותנו אבינו נח מפי הגבורה אנו עושין, ...אבל אם עשו שבע מצוות ...


16

You mentioned this verse in passing, but as far as I can tell, it provides complete and convincing proof that G-d is known by multiple names. Exodus 6:2-3, from Mechon Mamre: וַיְדַבֵּר אֱלֹהִים, אֶל-מֹשֶׁה; וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָיו, אֲנִי יְהוָה. וָאֵרָא, אֶל-אַבְרָהָם אֶל-יִצְחָק וְאֶל-יַעֲקֹב--בְּאֵל שַׁדָּי; וּשְׁמִי יְהוָה, לֹא נוֹדַעְתִּי לָהֶם ...


15

The straightforward answer to this question is that whereas the Christians are discussing what Hashem is made up of, the Kabbalists are discussing the ways in which He chose to reveal Himself. Just like we can understand that ה' ממית ומחיה is not reminiscent of trinity, since it is simply a reflection of what Hashem will do about different circumstances, ...


15

TL;DR Judaism believes that non-Jews must follow the 7 Noahide Laws. This is irrelevant of which religion they follow. However, if they follow a religion that teaches ideas that are in conflict with the 7 Noahide Laws, then they are also in conflict with these laws. If you mean "Does Judaism recognize that other religions exist?" then obviously the answer ...


15

See also this letter by the Lubavitcher Rebbe on this subject, in which he states: It is my firm belief that the sun revolves around the earth, as I have also declared publicly on various occasions and in discussion with professors specializing in this field of science. He also explains why he believed this way based on the Theory of Relativity.


14

Khan is echoing Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch, who wrote ~150 years ago about this new theory called evolution: ... if [evolution] were ever to gain complete acceptance by the scientific world, ... Judaism would call upon its adherents to give even greater reverence than ever before to the one, sole God Who, in His boundless creative wisdom and eternal ...


14

The best (English language) source, in my opinion, is Hyam Maccoby's Judaism on Trial: Jewish-Christian Disputations in the Middle Ages (Littman Library of Jewish Civilization, 1982; later adapted as a play viewable here). In it you will find a translation of the Ramban's Vikuach, and of the official church account of that disputation, together with an ...


13

The Aztecs were following white eagles, and do not seem to claim any sort of supernatural entity speaking to them. As the question notes, it is also very unclear from the source provided if they believe that Huitzilopochtli spoke to all the people. Marmuda is a human and described as a human. the fact that he is afterward identified as a god does not change ...


12

No more so than the belief that we are all G-d's children. Ezra is, however, compared to Moses (Sanhedrin, bottom of 21b; See also Yad Rama ad loc Sanhedrin 36a and Gittin 59a (comparing Ezra to Moses as a national leader and the greatest Torah scholar of his generation).


12

" my 4-year-old has offhandedly pointed out that "God's not real," or "not a real person."" In response to this exact line of conversation I would suggest the following. Admit to the child that based on how they understand "real", or how you have taught "real" to them in the past, they are correct. Explain to the child that some things are real even if ...


12

Rabbi Kelemen’s book Permission to Receive is essential reading and provides four rational approaches to the Torah’s Divine origin. I can’t summarise it here. The best evidence is our Mesorah – the tradition of transmission of the Torah. The link site also has articles on our history with the critical paragraph: On the fiftieth day after they began ...


12

there is no water-tight proof for Judaism (or God) since we believe the purpose of creation is free will (see Derech Hashem ch.1). But there are many indications of its truth, which although each one by itself may not be so convincing but the sheer number of these indications is enough to be considered sufficient proof. The first thing a person needs to do ...


12

The short answer to your question is "no", and that references to God's body in the biblical and rabbinic literature need to be understood figuratively. That said, there's a lot more to this than just "no", and there have been many religious Jews throughout history who have believed that God does (or at least can) possess corporeal form. In his commentary ...


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