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5

I once heard a true story (it might have been in one of Rabbi Paysach Krohn's books). There was this man who came late every day to shul. One day the Rabbi asked him, "I can see that you come to shul every day, maybe you could try and come on time". He replied, "Who cares, the main thing is that I come in the end". Several months later, ...


4

I asked this of Rav Schachter and he thought it's a good question for Tehillim and Selichot before Shacharit, but for afterwards seemingly it lasts all day.


3

Ketzos HaShulchan 47:13 says that if one said Retzei in error during the week, they do not need to repeat Birchas HaMazon.


3

The Shulchan Aruch (cited below) gives directions to the one who arrives late to the synagogue and finds that the congregation is already at the end of Pesukei D'zimrah. On that paragraph, the Mishnah Berurah (cited below) writes that ideally one should arrive early in order that one needn't skip any sections. The Mishnah Berurah contiues to quote that the ...


3

As can be seen in this Wiktionary entry, the preposition את is [u]sed to introduce a semantically definite direct object. The first clause (ה' עוז לעמו יתן) contains no definite direct object (the direct object עוז (strength) is not semantically definite) and thus there is no need for את. The second clause (ה' יברך את עמו בשלום) does contain a definite ...


2

A quote from the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch 1:4 (at the end): עַל אַחַת כַּמָּה וְכַמָּה לַעֲבוֹדַת מֶלֶךְ מַלְכֵי הַמְּלָכִים הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא, שֶׁיֵּשׁ לוֹ לְהִזָּהֵר לָקוּם בִמְהִירוּת וּבִזְרִיזוּת. וְהַמַּרְגִּיל אֶת עַצְמוֹ בַּדֶּרֶךְ הַזֶּה אַרְבַּע אוֹ חָמֵשׁ פְּעָמִים, לֹא יִכְבַּד עָלָיו אַחַר כָּךְ. וְהַבָּא לִטָּהֵר, מְסַיְּעִין לוֹ (סדר היום ...


2

According to Prof Moshe Gavra (מחקרים בסידורי תימן vol 3, p 297), although the practice to read Ruth isn't found in early Yemenite maḥzorim, the minhag has spread since the 18th century. Rabbi Yaḥya Ṣalaḥ (מהרי״ץ) wrote that they had the custom to read Ruth before minḥa. The common practice among Baladi Jews and many Shami communities is to read Ruth at home ...


1

You can say a similar formulation for any sick person at any time on Shabbat as the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch (193:4) writes You should say to the sick man [...] on Shabbos "This is Shabbos, we are forbidden to wail, healing is soon to come, His mercy is great, rest in peace." שַׁבָּת הִיא מִלִּזְעֹק, וּרְפוּאָה קְרוֹבָה לָבוֹא, וְרַחֲמָיו מְרֻבִּים, ...


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