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Ovadiah the prophet, at the time of his prophecy, was Jewish, not a gentile. He had converted. See Sanhedrin 39b: מר אפרים מקשאה תלמידו של רבי מאיר משום רבי מאיר עובדיה גר אדומי היה והיינו דאמרי אינשי מיניה וביה אבא ניזיל ביה נרגא That is, Efrayim Miksha’a, a student of Rabbi Meir, said in the name of Rabbi Meir: Obadiah was an Edomite convert. ...


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Welcome to Mi Yodeya and thank you for sharing your question. May it be G-d's will to send a complete and speedy recovery to your Aunt and also to give you peace of mind, tranquility of spirit and the strength to deal with the challenges facing you at this time. You say that you are "a potential convert" to Judaism. That means that at this time ...


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This idea comes from the following Passuk in Genesis 4:26 וּלְשֵׁ֤ת גַּם־הוּא֙ יֻלַּד־בֵּ֔ן וַיִּקְרָ֥א אֶת־שְׁמ֖וֹ אֱנ֑וֹשׁ אָ֣ז הוּחַ֔ל לִקְרֹ֖א בְּשֵׁ֥ם יְהוָֽה׃ (פ) The word הוּחַ֔ל can mean began, but it can also mean "profane", and thus the verse reads that in the days of Enosh, " profaning the name of the Hashem began." " ...


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A highly recommended book is "Masterplan" by Rabbi Aryeh Carmell. Here's a description of the book: Maybe you believe in God, but fail to see what this has to do with how one spends Friday night or which restaurant one eats in? Or maybe you think that the primary purpose of the mitzvot was to preserve Jewish identity—a function that has now been ...


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You're asking about a grandson of a bas levi? This only works one generation; it's not an "any drop of blood" thing. Miss Levi marries Mister Israel; their firstborn son doesn't need a pidyon haben because he was born to a Levite, and the Torah uses language of "first out of the womb" -- and the womb, in this case, is Levite. However, ...


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You are asking whether a Jewish son should mourn his righteous non-Jewish father to whom he owes gratefulness for having raised him and supported his Jewish growth. It is clear that there is no halakhic obligation to mourn for a non-Jew, at the same time certain mourning rites might be appropriate. R David Brofsky in his book Hilkhot Avelut (p. 109) writes ...


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I'd like to point out two things. First, the word לקבל is better translated as "to accept" rather than "to take". It is about accepting responsibility rather than taking what you please; in other words, it is, indeed, speaking about conversion. Or is it? In fact, one could take your question to an extreme. Perhaps the midrash means that I,...


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