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40

rosends got it right. But I'll go through the quotes anyhow. A. Non-Jews aren't humans. Keritot 6b. There are a handful of specific technical laws in the Bible that pertain to "an adam" which the Talmud interprets as "Jews only"; for a non-Jew we are more lenient. The idea simply is that most of the Torah's laws were intended for a Jewish audience, so ...


23

These attacks are usually amalgamations of the following: Pure invention -- some of the books listed don't exist or the quotes are fabrications Mistranslations or selective quoting Out of context quotes (statements made in the course of a protracted legal argument presented as definitive statements of belief or statements made to make a legal point being ...


20

Yes, the painting is based on a popular picture of the Chofetz Chaim, which can be seen in The Schwadron Collection of the National Library of Israel (Jerusalem). The archive lists the picture as following: A photo portrait of Rabbi Israel Meir Cohen ("Chafetz Chaim"): printed silver, black and white, 7X12 cm. Portfolio also includes a copy of this ...


14

Assuming the question means why do we shockel/shuckle in davening, I found the following article by Rabbi Yaakov Salomon who quotes Rabbi Shimon Schwab ztz"l. He says that our relationship with HaShem in davenning is motivated by love (swaying forward) and fear (moving away). There are those who are against shockeling in davening, see for example here under "...


14

The oldest source I could find is the Likutei MaHarich - (c. 1900). I recall hearing that the custom started, since the Halacha is that if the lady forgot to light one week she has to add a candle in future weeks, often when a lady gave birth they were busy and forgot. (Childbirth was not as easy years ago). Due to this they added a candle and today it has ...


14

Nitei Gavriel Chanuka - page 306 mentions this in the name of Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin. Rabbi Genut at din.org.il also quotes Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin and says it is mentioned in Chapter 19:4 in the name of the Avodas Eved M'Lomza. YUTorah.org also gives the Otzar Kol Minhagei Yeshurin as the source. This leads me to believe that there is no earlier ...


14

Sefer B'Reshit: the Yerushalmi (Sotah 1:10) already refers to it as Sefer B'reshit. This is also found in the Zohar (Raya Mehemna Vol. II Parashat Mishpatim 119b). Sefer Sh'mot: The Midrash Lekah Tov (11th cent.) has a little rhyme at the end of Parashat Pekudei that refers to Sefer Sh'mot. More common is "Sefer V'eleh Sh'mot" found in many Midrashim (...


13

In general, I wouldn't post just a quote, but it so perfectly addressed the question... From Hayom Yom (29th of first Adar), written/compiled by the Lubavitcher Rebbe: In responding to L'chayim there are two versions: L'chayim Tovim Ul'Shalom, "for good life, and for peace." The reason for this blessing is that the first time drinking wine is ...


13

Click here to see this video that has been making the rounds on Jewish sites recently has a short scene of the Chafetz Chaim. Here are some screen caps:


13

The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


13

Rav Hirsch writes in his commentary to the Bible, on Gen. 4:4, the first time that animal sacrifice is mentioned: First, idolatry did not yet exist. It follows, then, that the offering are not a mere concession to polytheism. The offerings antedate polytheism. They are as old as mankind itself, and they are a natural expression of human thoughts and ...


13

This looks like an English translation of the Yiddish prayer גאט פון אברהם: גאט פון אברהם און פון יצחק און פון יעקב! באהיט דיין פאלק ישראל פון אלע בייזן אין דיינעם לויב, אז דער ליבער שבת קודש גייט אוועק. און די וואך זאל אונדז קומען צו אמונה שלימה, צו אמונת חכמים צו אהבת ודיבוק חברים טובים צו דביקות הבורא ברוך הוא מאמין צו זיין בשלושה עשר עיקרים שלך ...


12

The Tur in Orach Chaim 124 says that his father the Rosh would say Baruch Hu U'Baruch Shemo based on the Pasuk Ki Shem Hashem Ekra Havu Godel L'Elokeinu.


12

In terms of the history of division of Aliyot, you should see Ilana Katzenellenbogen's survey article in Sinai 119 (1998), pp. 224-45. She looks at 33 different division customs from the last 1000 years from around the Jewish world and compiles a ~10 page chart with all the different variants from "our common custom" (OCC). Her conclusions are (summarized ...


11

There is a piece in the Tshuvas HaRashba in siman 418 which denigrates the belief in gilgulim. It is a response from the Chachmei Luniel to the Rashba, proving that they don't believe in any nonjewish ideas. See there ד.ה. ומתועלותיה בסוד הנפש. One of the points they raise why it is an unjewish belief is because judgement and punishment is a fundamental ...


11

There are two basic schools of thought about this principle cited by Rebbi Zeira. The Talmud in Niddah 66a is the most primary source for the discussion of this. אמר רב התקין רבי בשדות ראתה יום אחד תשב ששה והוא שנים תשב ששה והן שלשה תשב שבעה נקיים אמר ר' זירא בנות ישראל החמירו על עצמן שאפילו רואות טפת דם כחרדל יושבות עליה שבעה נקיים Rav said: Rebbi ...


10

It is found in Teshuvas HoRosh (4:19) in his father's name. In the Torah Temimah on Devarim (page 480 the last 4 lines of the page) quotes Sefer Chareidim who quotes a Midrash to say ברוך הוא וברוך שמו on every Beracha.


10

Kovetz Bais Aharon V'Yisrael 66 - page 97 says the source for standing at Lecha Dodi is the Tikunei Shabbos which mentions that one should stand Lekovod Shabbos Kodesh while saying the Lecha Dodi. It is also mentioned in Kitzur H'shla. They go on to mention that the Sar Shalom M'Belz said that when Rabbi Shlomo Alkabatz composed the Lecha Dodi he requested ...


9

I Googled it and came up with this page (see top left). It says to look at Zohar Chadash Yisro 31a. In the Zohar, it is referred to as ארבעים ותשע חילי דמסאבותא


9

http://chareidi.org/archives5761/korach/KRfeatures.htm While our rabbis tell us that davening at kivrei tzaddikim is a segulah for all types of help, the tradition of Amuka as an address for unmarried men and women is a relatively new one, according to experts in the field. It was "rediscovered" about fifty years ago by Rav Shalom Gefner of Meah ...


9

This custom is mentioned in the Shulchan Aruch (OC 610:1). It is supposed to serve as a reminder to avoid marital relations on Yom Kippur. It is common to allow at least some light into the bedroom: see "The Laws of Lighting Candles for Yom Kippur" by R' Yosef Zimbal.


9

The commentary often attributed to the Rosh and sometimes to one of his students, to B'reshis 4:16 (after Kayin's banishment), reads: ויצא קין יצא כמעלים מבוראו ונגלה לו הקב״ה וא״ל גדול עונך מנשא כיון ששמע קין התחיל לעשות תשובה ואמר גדול עוני מנשוא ואמר אתה טוען עליונים ותחתונים ונקראת נושא עון אמר לו הקב״ה אתה עשית תשובה אבל מחצה עד שהוא יוצא פגע בו אדם ...


9

One finds swaying both in the context of prayer and Torah study. Since the reasons may be connected, I will discuss both. To paraphrase On the Mainline: The first source is critical...The first source is a poem of Shemuel Ha-naggid. In this poem he is criticizing the degeneration of Torah study...As an example of their lack of orderliness he mentions their ...


9

Rav Joseph B. Soloveitchik (quoted in Nefesh Harav page 151-2) was careful to sit during Ashrei of Mincha based on the language of the Rambam Tefilla 9:8. He felt this was not just a permission to sit but a requirement in order to establish (לקבוע) a Tzibbur. The footnote there references an article in Beis Yitzchak (5749 volume 21 page 18) where Rav ...


9

I've contacted Dovid Katz from Vilnius Gediminas Technical University, a renown scholar of the Yiddish language (among others), who wrote numerous papers on linguistics, and his PhD dissertation discussed in detail the phonology of the language(s) that Ashkenazi Jews spoke. As I could understand of his letter and his works, there was a proto-Ashkenazi long ō ...


8

I suspect the original source is the requirement that after rending a sotah's garments, the garment must be tied "above her breasts" so that she is not exposed. I'm not sure, but this may mean at or above the collarbone which is about where the breasts begin to slope.


8

Your second answer seems to be closest... As far as we can tell, scrolls in the ancient world were kept wrapped in cloth and stored in wooden cases or boxes. The Gemara attests both to mitpahot [cloth wrappers] (Megillah 26a) and a tik [wooden case] (Megillah 26b) used to store sifrei Torah. Bracha Yaniv's article on Torah scroll accessories in the Balkans ...


8

The actual dispute is not about which direction to wrap, but the location of the loop through which the retzua is threaded. We find this dispute in the Biur Halacha (27:2 ד"ה המנהג), he quotes the Beis Yosef in the name of the Mahari Ben-Chaviv who holds that while the "yud" should be located at the bottom of the tefillah the loop should be located at the ...


8

The Rokeach in his commentary to the siddur (פירושי סידור התפילה לרוקח [צד] רצה במנוחתינו) says: כשהחזן אומ' ברוך אתה ה' אלקינו ואלקי אבותינו ומתחיל התפילה, הקהל עונים ברוך הוא וברוך שמו, ויש אומ' ברוך שם כבוד מלכותו לעולם ועד, ויש אומרים יהי שם ה' מבורך מעתה ועד עולם, על כן יזהר הקורא את השם שיזכירו ביראה כי כן נאה לו The source may be from this ...


8

Chida in Shem Hagedolim (page 7 of the file) quotes Seder Hadoros, who says that the commentary on Iyov isn't from Rashi. On that same page he also quotes someone who claims that none of the commentary on Neviim is from Rashi, although he disagrees with that.


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