21

Very good question. The Piskei Tshuvos 5:492 brings down that scrupulous individuals are accustomed to eat matzah on peasach sheni. In footnote 9, he brings down that in the siddur Yaavetz (Rav Yaakov Emden) that it was revealed to him from the heavens that the kedusha of pesach and matzah lasts until pesach sheni because when they went out from Egypt they ...


19

R' Eizik Vitebsker writes (look in Os 26) that the origin of this Chumra was from the Mezritcher Maggid. R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi explains that since some opinions say that flour which was baked (without being kneaded first) can still become chometz after contacting water as it may not have been baked well. He writes that (at least in his time) one could ...


18

The Nitei Gavriel Pesach 2 Chapter 43:9 brings in the name of the Shevet Halevi that since a convert is as if he is newly born there is a question whether he is still considered a Bechor. Therefore the Nitei Gavriel concludes that it is best that he should either make a Siyum or be part of a Seudas Mitzva.


16

Rakusen's of England makes cracker-sized machine "tea matzas", and they're round! (Mind you, you'd have to eat a few of those "crackers" to have a complete serving of matza for the mitzva.) The only ingredients are flour and water, so they truly are matzas. I've occasionally seen them in American supermarkets. With the early machines in the late 1800s, they'...


16

The Mishnah cites eating in haste as one of the few differences between the paschal offering that first year and that of subsequent years. The modern Passover meal is modeled primarily on the latter.


15

See Tosfos "me'alyah", Pesachim 3b, where it says most were sheep. Background: A non-Jew came and told R' Yehuda ben Beseirah that he routinely goes to Jerusalem to eat from the Korban Pesach (which is forbidden to non-Jews). R' Yehuda wasn't going to Jerusalem himself, and so couldn't notify the Jews there. So he came up with a plan for the non-Jew to get ...


15

In my research over this Pesach, I have found some reasons why G-d chose the Ten Plagues specifically. Many of the answers come from the same source. The answer is middah k'neged middah (roughly translated as "karma"). Each of the plagues was punishment for something the Egyptians did to the Israelites. Blood The Egyptians closed all the mikva'ot and ...


15

My best guess is that it's the policy of the kosher dining hall to not allow outside food or drink to cut down on the amount of non-kosher food which comes in. To my knowledge, there's nothing wrong with water or water bottles (even when in the possession of a non-Jew) and that the person who told you that it was not permitted to bring the water bottle in ...


14

See this answer He can accept the gift with intention not to acquire it, and discard it later. Although it is forbidden to touch chametz on Pesach, for fear that the person will come to eat it (see Orach Chaim 446:3, and Magen Avraham 5; Mishnah Berurah 10), this applies to circumstances where there is a concern for eating the chametz. Under ...


14

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 114:7 states: אָסוּר לִמְכּוֹר אֶת הֶחָמֵץ לְמוּמָר אוֹ לְמוּמֶרֶת; וְלֹא לְבֶן מוּמֶרֶת, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁיְלָדַתּוּ מֵאֵינוֹ יְהוּדִי לְאַחַר שֶׁהֵמִירָה, כִּי לְעִנְיָן זֶה דִּינָם כְּמוֹ יִשְֹרָאֵל, וַהֲוֵי לֵהּ חֲמֵצוֹ שֶׁל יִשְֹרָאֵל שֶׁעָבַר עָלָיו הַפֶּסַח דְּאָסוּר בַּהֲנָאָה One may not sell one's Chametz to a Jew ...


13

You can own them (Rama in Shulchan Aruch OC 453:1). The Mishna Berura there adds that you can even derive benefit from them.


13

From the Wikipedia article on Chametz (leaven): The Torah has several commandments governing chametz during Passover: The positive commandment to remove all chametz from one's home (Exodus 12:15). Not to possess chametz in one's domain. (Exodus 12:19, Deuteronomy 16:4). Not to eat chametz, or mixtures containing chametz (Exodus 13:3, Exodus 12:...


13

Your question and DoubleAA's comment on my original answer have inspired me to do some research and learn some really fascinating information about the Hebrew calendar. First, some background information: Our current 19-year intercalary cycle was instituted by Hillel II in the fourth century CE. The calendar is a lunisolar calendar which typically has 12 ...


12

An original source of this custom is the Sheyare Knesses HaGedola Siman 471:3 where he writes that the custom in Kushta (Istanbul) is to avoid eating matza as of Rosh Chodesh Nissan.


12

Nit'ei Gavriel (Pesach 108:5) states, as Dan mentioned in his comment, that in Eretz Yisrael in such a case they read it on the first day of Pesach, and in chutz la'aretz they do so on the eighth day.


12

This question ought to be, "Why can Ashkenazi Jews not eat rice on Passover?" There are 5 grains that make Ḥametz when mixed with water and allowed to rise: barley, rye, oats, wheat, and spelt. Any others that have been added by communal custom are just that - additions by virtue of communal custom.


11

R Eliezer Dunner of Bene Brak told me, a ger firstborn, to fast. (The siyumim had already concluded.)


11

People have attempted all sorts of mental gymnastics to develop a Theory of Everything vis-a-vis kitniyot. I spare my poor brain and follow Rav Moshe Feinstein's opinion (Igros, OC3:63): it's kitniyot if it happened to have been banned (or "warned against"); not if it didn't. Rav Moshe also suspects that at some point they stopped adding foods to the list ...


11

There is a concern that by opening the box, a usable vessel has been completed, which can be a violation of the prohibition of makeh b'patish, one of the 39 forbidden categories of "work" on Shabbath and Yom Tov. From Halachipedia (based on Shemirath Shabbath KeHilchatha 9:10-1): Cardboard boxes closed with gummed paper or tape, papers stuck together, or ...


11

There is no special Talmudic dispensation regarding oats. The Mishna lists a grain called שבולת שועל as able to become Chametz. Most Rishonim don't identify that grain with what we call oats. Some Rishonim do identify that grain with what we call oats. Your point is one very strong proof for the former position, according to which indeed oats can't become ...


10

Hacham Ovadia Yosef discusses this issue in Yabia Omer Helek 7 Siman 44 in terms of the kinneret, which supplies water for most of israel. Kibbutzim along the coast are KNOWN for dumping hametz into the water. He answers that hametz dumped before pesach is nullified in 60. During pesach, he applies the concept of "tzonen bitzonen". Since the hametz and water ...


10

The roots of this minhag actually lie in the Gemara itself. In Pesachim 40b, there is a discussion which says explicitly that Rav Papi allowed servants in the beit Reish Galuta to thicken a tavshil with "chasisi." The Rif says this is matzah meal; Tosafot say it is lentil flour, and Rashi says it is dried flour. Rava says we need to be concerned in a place ...


10

If he can indeed drink wine for this purpose (as per the sources cited in WAF's answer and the comments there), then that's that. Otherwise, though: there are opinions that even for the Four Cups one can use chamar medinah (a beverage used as the national drink of importance, e.g., beer or mead) - Rema to Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 483:1. Now, a nazir is ...


10

The Gemara in Pesachim 46a (brought in the Rambam Laws of Chametz 5:13 and the Shulchan Aruch OC 459:2) says that if one leaves dough for the length of time that it takes to walk 1 "mil" (a Talmudic unit of distance) then it becomes Chametz. Opinions regarding the time it takes to walk a mil vary from 18-24 minutes, and here we are strict to take the shorter ...


10

If such matzos are rare or nonexistent, it's because they don't fit as well in a box and thus require either a round box, which costs more to make and assemble, or both more box space per matza, taking up valuable room in shipping etc., and empty space in each box, increasing the likelihood of breaking matzos. Source (so to speak): conjecture.


10

You can listen to him discuss it here at 56:12. He says it isn't rau'i l'achilat adam (fit for human consumption) so it isn't considered eating. He quotes some opinions that it is a problem of washing the inside of the mouth on Yom Kippur, but he doesn't seem so impressed by the idea.


10

Matzah made with other liquids besides (instead of) water are called "matzah ashira" enriched matzahs. While some object to them because they undercut the "lechem oni" bread of affliction that water/flour matzot represent, there are other concerns regarding whether they create an environment for fermentation. Here is one treatment of the argument with the ...


10

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


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