15

The only source I have yet to find acknowledging this switch in clothing from a Sephardic perspective is in the English edition to the Yalkut Yosef Hilkhot Shabbat. Under Siman 242, Halakhah 5, regarding the mitzvah to change from weekday clothes into more elegant garments, the editor (R. Yisrael Bitan) added a special footnote: The Kabbalists ruled that ...


15

The relevant word is דכא which in some scrolls is written דכה. See Deuteronomy 23:2. While the portion of Aleppo Codex containing that word is currently lost, we do have the Aleppo Codex to Tehillim 90:3 where the same word appears spelled with an Alef. The Mesorah there notes that this spelling is used in three places and lists them: Deuteronomy 23:2, ...


14

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


13

Rav Yosef Messas a"h (he served as Rav in Tilimsan Algeria, Meknes Morocco, and as Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Haifa) held that wearing costumes/disguises on Purim is absolutely forbidden as hukas hagoyim and that its origins stem from an imitation of the pre-Lent festivity of Carnavale which itself has origins in the orgiastic paganism of Bacchanalia. He ...


13

Rabbi Berel Wein has suggested that long ago, there were a certain amount of anti-Sephardic animosity related to the fact that when during the Crusades, the Ashkenazic Jews forced to choose between the cross and the sword went to their deaths; whereas during the Spanish Inquisition, many Spanish (i.e. Sephardic) Jews chose to stay alive and outwardly profess ...


13

According to Wikipedia "Baruch Tehiye" is an acceptable response, but "Chazak Ve'Ematz" is the common one. Among Morrocans it would be "Kulchem Beruchim".


12

Sephardi Jews is a general term referring to the descendants of Spanish and Portuguese Jews who lived in the Iberian Peninsula before their expulsion in 1492 by the Alhambra Decree. It can also refer to those who use a Sephardic style of liturgy, or would otherwise define themselves in terms of Jewish customs and traditions from the Iberian Peninsula. (...


12

147zcbm made what even 147zcbm thought was a wild inference from how things are ordered in the Aruch Hashulchan. You'll never believe what happened next. The Aruch Hashulchan was written by R' Yechiel Michel Halevi Epstein. His son, R' Baruch Halevi Epstein, author of the Torah Temima, also wrote an autobiographical work called Mekor Baruch. His research, ...


11

Covering One’s Eyes During the Recitation of Shema cites the following explanation as give by Rabbi Eli J Mansour According to Kabbalistic teaching, one should cover his eyes during Shema while positioning his fingers in the shape of the letters “Shin,” “Dalet” and “Yod,” which spell the Divine Name of “Sha-dai.” This is done by bringing the three ...


10

This did not start with the post Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel. Nor did it start with Ovadia Yosef. Rabbis throughout the orient wore this type of garb regularly, as their dress reflected the culture they were in. So for example, you have Rabbi Aharon Ben Simeon, former Chief Rabbi of Egypt (until 1921 i believe) The mantle of the Chief Sephardic Rabbi of ...


9

The Beit Yosef there quotes many Rishonim who have a version of the story (Yevamot 62b) that Rabbi Akiva's students died until פרוס העצרת a half [month] before Shavuot. So 49-15=34 and on the last day we say that a partial day counts as the whole day so on the 34th in the morning, the mourning ends.


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 56:11 writes (my translation): מנהג האשכנזים כדעת הרמ''א, לעמוד בשעה שעונים קדיש וברכו, וספרדי שמתפלל עם אשכנזים, נכון שיעמוד גם הוא עמהם בעת אמירת קדיש וברכו, כדי שלא יהיה בכלל יושב בין העומדים. The Ashkenazi custom, per the ReM"A, is to stand when responding to Qaddish and Barekhu. And, as for a Sepharadi ...


9

Indeed, the Beit Yosef (OC 36) cites the Gemara you reference and claims that the ש should have a pointed base. The Peri Megadim (EA end of 32) is unsure if this is a necessary component of the letter. The Keset HaSofer (5:2:ש) implies it would be Kosher Bedieved, but one should be very careful to avoid a flat base. The Mishna Berura (Mishnat Sofrim ש) is ...


8

Taken from my answer here: Yalkut Yosef 685:12 ומתוך ספר תורה בכתב אשכנזי, יצאו ידי חובה וכן ההיפך, שהכל יוצאים ידי חובה בספר תורה שנכתב בכתב ספרדי, אף שהיו''ד של הצד''י נכתב כיו''ד הפוכה. a) A Sefaradi who heard from a Ahkenazi written Sefer Torah is Yose. b) An Ashkenazi is also Yose from a Torah written in Sefaradi ...


8

The Tur Yoreh Deah 274 says in the name of the Rosh that there is no issue with the different lettering. The Meiri Shabbos 104a also indicates that there is no issue. The Noda B'Yehuda Yora Deah 171 also indicates that it is fine.


8

Your second answer seems to be closest... As far as we can tell, scrolls in the ancient world were kept wrapped in cloth and stored in wooden cases or boxes. The Gemara attests both to mitpahot [cloth wrappers] (Megillah 26a) and a tik [wooden case] (Megillah 26b) used to store sifrei Torah. Bracha Yaniv's article on Torah scroll accessories in the Balkans ...


8

According to this website, the custom in the Jewish Tunisian community is to recite the "Eishet Chayil", after the reading of "Shir Hashirim" (Song of Songs) and in the Djerba community to recite it during the weeks of Sefirat HaOmer. [In many Sefardic communities, "Shir Hashirim" is recited weekly, after "Kabbalat Shabbat", before "Arvit". Some of the ...


7

Just to throw in a few more modern sources: Har Tzevi OC 1:32, Minchat Yitzchak 4:47 and Mishneh Halachot 7:8 all explicitly rule that Vellish is kosher. Tzitz Eliezer 14:3:4 permits post facto even Sta"m that was written with a mix of Vellish and Ashkenazi. Igrot Moshe OC 5:2 also permits other forms of writing but he is quick to point out that it is better ...


7

When a Koehein is called to duchan ("Kohanim!"), there is a mitzvah d'oraysa for him to go up and say the blessings. For somewhat unclear reasons, this practice was abandoned among Ashkenazi Jewry except for on yomim tovim. This means that Kohanim are missing the opportunity to fullfil the mitzvah, but they are not going against the mitzvah as long as they ...


7

Hazon Ovadia Purim pg. 199 מה שנוהגים להתחפש וללבוש מסיכות בפורים, אין כל איסור בדבר.‏ It is Mutar to dress up Purim. What is Asur on Purim? Cross dressing Inviting magicians Making fun of the Rabbis on Purim (All from Yalkut Yosef 695)


7

שו"ת יחווה דעת, חלק ב סימן עא discusses this and concludes that since it is commonly done there is no reason to suspend the Minhag.


7

Hacham Ovadia Yosef has a Kelal called "Bimkom Minhag Kadum En Omrim Kibalnu Horaot Maran- in the place where there is a preexisting Minhag we don't follow Maran". In this case there was a preexisting Minhag to do Kaparot therefor we do Kaparot. The reason Hacham Ovadia holds like this is because Maran writes in the Hakdama to Bet Yosef that he didn't come ...


7

The Aruch Hashulchan was himself Ashkenazi. But he claimed that he descended from a prominent Sephardic Rabbinical family. The Aruch Hashulchans son Rabbi Baruch Epstein writes in his book Mekor Baruch which details his life and family history, that his family had a tradition that they were originally expelled from Spain along with the majority of Spanish ...


6

Institutionalized Judaism is largely composed of Ashkenazim, which makes some Sepharadim feel like they need to fit in or dress 'acceptably' in order to be accepted. Sometimes, people need to dress up in order to be taken seriously: that is the unfortunate state of a sizable portion of Jewry these days. This answer is based on personal experience, in fact, ...


6

The Shulchan Aruch (551:4) rules regarding both the case of Tisha b'Av on Saturday and Tisha b'Av on Sunday that there is no mourning period and some say (Yesh Omrim) that there is mourning the entire preceding week. Generally when the Shulchan Aruch quotes two opinions and only the latter is prefaced by 'some say', the halacha follows the former opinion (...


6

http://ohr.edu/ask_db/ask_main.php/38/Q1/ I spoke to Rav Chaim Pinchas Scheinberg, Zatzal, about the Halacha in this case. He told me that Sephardic Jews rule according to Rav Yosef Karo, and therefore use glass dishes for both meat and milk, while Ashkenazic Jews conduct themselves according to the opinion of Rav Moshe Isserlish, therefore ...


6

After-the-fact, Ashkenazim rule that glass never "treifs" up food. The question is whether I may go eat at his house in the first place, is that called "choosing to use glass dishes"? An easy way out is Rabbi Moshe Heinemann's view (shlit'a). From the Star-K: Q: There are many varieties of glass on the market. Do arcoroc, duralex, pyrex, corelle and ...


6

I posed this question today to HaRav Shammai Gross Shlit"a. He is one of the Gedolei HaPoskim here in Eretz Yisrael (and happens to be a Cohen as well.) He said while there were poskim that said once the Ashkanazi Kohen is in a Sephardi minyan in chutz l'aretz that does duchen that he may join them. Still one shouldn't lichatchila go to such a shul in order ...


6

Likutei Menashe which is a Likut of Sefardi Minhagim says on page 224 - 18 that the Minhag is to dress up on Purim. Zecher David which is written by Rabbi David Zechus (a Sephardi) published in Livorno mentions a few reasons why we dress up on Purim, which indicates that he had no problem with this Minhag.


6

According to this article, we do :-) THE LAWS OF PESACH by Rav David Brofsky Shiur #2: The Laws of Pesach Defining Chametz (1) R. Yosef Karo (Shulchan Arukh 462:1-4) rules in accordance with the view of Rabbeinu Tam and the Rambam, who permit matzot made with fruit juice. The Rema, however, concludes that Ashkenazim should refrain from eating matza ashira, ...


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