15

The relevant word is דכא which in some scrolls is written דכה. See Deuteronomy 23:2. While the portion of Aleppo Codex containing that word is currently lost, we do have the Aleppo Codex to Tehillim 90:3 where the same word appears spelled with an Alef. The Mesorah there notes that this spelling is used in three places and lists them: Deuteronomy 23:2, ...


13

Rabbi Berel Wein has suggested that long ago, there were a certain amount of anti-Sephardic animosity related to the fact that when during the Crusades, the Ashkenazic Jews forced to choose between the cross and the sword went to their deaths; whereas during the Spanish Inquisition, many Spanish (i.e. Sephardic) Jews chose to stay alive and outwardly profess ...


13

147zcbm made what even 147zcbm thought was a wild inference from how things are ordered in the Aruch Hashulchan. You'll never believe what happened next. The Aruch Hashulchan was written by R' Yechiel Michel Halevi Epstein. His son, R' Baruch Halevi Epstein, author of the Torah Temima, also wrote an autobiographical work called Mekor Baruch. His research, ...


13

According to Wikipedia "Baruch Tehiye" is an acceptable response, but "Chazak Ve'Ematz" is the common one. Among Morrocans it would be "Kulchem Beruchim".


11

Covering One’s Eyes During the Recitation of Shema cites the following explanation as give by Rabbi Eli J Mansour According to Kabbalistic teaching, one should cover his eyes during Shema while positioning his fingers in the shape of the letters “Shin,” “Dalet” and “Yod,” which spell the Divine Name of “Sha-dai.” This is done by bringing the three ...


10

This did not start with the post Sephardic Chief Rabbi of Israel. Nor did it start with Ovadia Yosef. Rabbis throughout the orient wore this type of garb regularly, as their dress reflected the culture they were in. So for example, you have Rabbi Aharon Ben Simeon, former Chief Rabbi of Egypt (until 1921 i believe) The mantle of the Chief Sephardic Rabbi of ...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 56:11 writes (my translation): מנהג האשכנזים כדעת הרמ''א, לעמוד בשעה שעונים קדיש וברכו, וספרדי שמתפלל עם אשכנזים, נכון שיעמוד גם הוא עמהם בעת אמירת קדיש וברכו, כדי שלא יהיה בכלל יושב בין העומדים. The Ashkenazi custom, per the ReM"A, is to stand when responding to Qaddish and Barekhu. And, as for a Sepharadi ...


9

Indeed, the Beit Yosef (OC 36) cites the Gemara you reference and claims that the ש should have a pointed base. The Peri Megadim (EA end of 32) is unsure if this is a necessary component of the letter. The Keset HaSofer (5:2:ש) implies it would be Kosher Bedieved, but one should be very careful to avoid a flat base. The Mishna Berura (Mishnat Sofrim ש) is ...


8

According to this website, the custom in the Jewish Tunisian community is to recite the "Eishet Chayil", after the reading of "Shir Hashirim" (Song of Songs) and in the Djerba community to recite it during the weeks of Sefirat HaOmer. [In many Sefardic communities, "Shir Hashirim" is recited weekly, after "Kabbalat Shabbat", before "Arvit". Some of the ...


7

According to this article, we do :-) THE LAWS OF PESACH by Rav David Brofsky Shiur #2: The Laws of Pesach Defining Chametz (1) R. Yosef Karo (Shulchan Arukh 462:1-4) rules in accordance with the view of Rabbeinu Tam and the Rambam, who permit matzot made with fruit juice. The Rema, however, concludes that Ashkenazim should refrain from eating matza ashira, ...


7

The Aruch Hashulchan was himself Ashkenazi. But he claimed that he descended from a prominent Sephardic Rabbinical family. The Aruch Hashulchans son Rabbi Baruch Epstein writes in his book Mekor Baruch which details his life and family history, that his family had a tradition that they were originally expelled from Spain along with the majority of Spanish ...


6

I think כף החיים might be the best analogy. example page


6

The text of the Selihot appears at Da`at (Herzog College) and at Wikitext. The text is nearly the same every day. There are additions for the 10 days of repentance, and there is a small section which varies based on the day of the week. There are also sections which are said in some congregations but not in others.


6

There isn't a difference in construction. The difference is that Sepharadim (traditionally) do not accept communal 'Eruvin in large cities/neighborhoods, due to the position of the Mehaber (Shulhan 'Aruch O"H 345:7) that defines* a public domain by size, not by population density. Some Many Sepharadim have accepted the Ashkenazi leniency in following the ...


6

I can't attest to the truth of this, but I once heard R' Orlofsky say that some Ashkenazi Yeshivos do not accept Sefardim (or limit their acceptance) for the sake of the Sefardim - they feel that the Sefardim should respect their own tradition, and should attend Yeshivos that encourage and support that tradition.


6

According to Derech Eress, a book on the customs of Aleppo,the Jews used to celebrate 2 days of Purim out of Safek. ולכן נהגו לעשות פורים שני ימים, אלא שקוראים את המגילה בלי ברכה: וכן היה מנהג ארם צובה מימי קדם, שנהגו כל דיני פורים בשני הימים (וגם קראו בתורה בברכה - ורק על המגילה (לא בירכו, כאמור). מנהג זה המשיך אצל המוסתערבים (התושבים הוותיקים) ...


6

The Gemara (Yevamot 14a) says (regarding if Beis Shammai followed their own Psak): ומ"ד עשו קרינן כאן (דברים יד, א) לא תתגודדו לא תעשו אגודות אגודות אמר אביי כי אמרינן לא תתגודדו כגון שתי בתי דינים בעיר אחת הללו מורים כדברי ב"ש והללו מורים כדברי ב"ה אבל שתי בתי דינים בשתי עיירות לית לן בה And yet the question remains: According to the one who said ...


6

Here's a link to my "Celebrating the Exodus from Egypt in Egypt". (I am adding the text on request in case the link dies. My father was Sephardic and my mother was Mizrahi, so we were in both worlds.) http://www.hsje.org/mystory/maurice_m_mizrahi/CelebratingExodus2.html I was born and raised in Egypt during just about the worst period to be a Jew in Egypt....


6

The pamphlet makes a great case but it overstates it a bit. Yabia Omer 9:10 speaks for itself. Initially Rav Ovadia believed it was asur but seeing that the minhag of tremendous segments of klal yisrael including the most religious (see there for examples such as the Or Letzion and students in Radin) he was compelled to write his teshuva. He is adamantly ...


5

There are many Sephardi works of mussar. In fact, the first books of mussar were written by Sepharadim. Here's are some: Rambam's Hilkhot Deot from his Mishneh Torah Avraham ben Rambam's Hamaspik LeOvdei Ha' Rav Bahya's Chovot HaLevavot Rav Yonah's Shaarei Teshuvah Rav Isaac Aboav's Menorat HaMaor Rav Palagi's Kaf HaHaim Chida's Avodat HaKodesh Rav Eliyahu ...


5

Wikipedia writes Rabbi Ovadia Yosef's opinion, that a wide knowledge of halacha is dominant over studying useless portions of gemara. He emphasizes that the Sephardic system of learning, which emphasizes Bkiut (extensive familiarity with the Talmud, Mishna and Poskim), is superior to the Ashkenazi system which relies on deep analysis employing pilpul. ...


5

Kibbeh is meat deep-fried in a cracked-wheat shell, and Lahme Baajin is like a mini-pizza but made with meat. As Kibbeh are flour based and fried, they are Mezonot. Lahme Baajin are baked, but because they are stuffed with a filling, they fall under the category of "Pat Haba BeKisnin" and are Mezonot. Sources: The Shulchan Aruch and my Sephardic-ness.


5

O Ch 284 (4) starts with the words that someone under barmitzvah (age not specified) can say the maftir. The source is a gemoro in Megilo 23a.


5

The practice of tying a knot to find a lost object is found in wiccan practice , and may have originated in ancient Greek culture Furthermore, even if these foreign practice somehow snuck into Jewish forklore, doing 'spells' , or 'charms' , or anything of the sort, is inconsistent with the Torah: When you have come to the land the Lord, your G-d, is ...


5

According to Rav Bentzion Abba Shaul 2:perek 12:5 that if the dough is plain(not mixed with milk or oil) and tomato sauce and cheese is placed ontop not inside the dough it is hamotzei. See footnotes as well. It also seems that the amount of slices make no difference since it is considered pas.


5

I found this two books, one on HebrewBooks: חסד ואמת - מנהגי ק"ק אלג'יר and one on GoogleBooks: זה השולחן, they should deal with Algeria Minhagim... And there is a list of many other Jewish Books from Algeria in This Page, you may find useful too. Hope it helps :)


5

A source for skipping a part of U'va L'tziyon in the house of a mourner is the Avudraham. Avudraham - in Seder Tfilas H'taniyos (end of page in this linked edition) says that similar to Tisha B'Av where we skip V'Ani Zos Brisi since we can not learn Torah then, the same should be done in the house of a mourner, since the mourner is forbidden to learn Torah. ...


5

From this cached page: בשעת אמירת "עשרת המכות" שופך הגר"מ יין לתוך קערה, והמסובים מכריזים "ה' יצילנו" על כל מכה ומכה After every one of the 10 plagues, after spilling out some wine the communal response is Hashem Yatzilenu - may Hashem guard over us.


5

You've indicated interest in 1) limmud Halakhah be'iyun (i.e. in-depth Halakhah study), 2) mussar (i.e. character development), 3) parashah study, 4) mysticism and 5) biographies (in that order, unless I'm mistaken). As such, I personally recommend the following books 1, 2: Halakhah (chronological): Mishneh Torah (HaRaMBa"M) Shulḥan 'Arukh (Maran HaRav ...


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