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32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


24

עתניאל בן קנז ועכסה בת כלב — see Judges 1:13 EDIT: I found some more: יואש מלך יהודה ויהועדן - See Kings II 14:2 אחז מלך יהודה ואבי בת-זכריה - See Kings II 18:2 חזקיהו מלך יהודה וחפצי-בה - See Kings II 21:1 מנשה מלך יהודה ומשלמת בת חרוץ - See Kings II 21:19


22

Pischei Teshuvah (Yoreh De'ah 265:6) cites the opinion of Mabit, that it is best not to use names of people from before Avraham. There are indeed opposing opinions cited in PT there, and after all we see that Noach is used often enough; but this may have reduced the use of the name Adam. It's also possible that it had to do with it being commonly used as a ...


22

There are the following others: אביהיל and אבישור (I Chron. 2:29) מעכה and מכיר (ibid. 7:16) שלחו אותם and שחרים (ibid. 8:8, according to Radak, Metzudos and Malbim) יהושבעת and יהוידע (II Chron. 22:11)


22

Because "Alfasi" is really "al-Fasi". "Al-Fasi" is Arabic for "the Fezite" (Fez being the city in Morocco where he lived). So kind of like how the word "of" gets swallowed in "USA", the word "the" got swallowed in "Rif". Wouldn't have made much sense to make his acronym stand for "Rabbi Yitzchak The".


22

According to the sources cited by the Gra on Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 147:3, the prohibition against mentioning the name of a foreign deity does not apply to the name of Jesus, and in fact we find that he is mentioned by name in many sources. In a very interesting teshuva, R' Esriel Hildesheimer discusses this issue at some length. He comments that the ...


20

Because you do not know that many people named Adam. It is a traditional Hebrew name.


19

According to Radak (Yehoshua 1:1), this is grammatically proper for "ben" to become "bin" when it and the following word are small and connected together in speech. Other examples where "ben" becomes "bin": דִּבְרֵי אָגוּר בִּן יָקֶה הַמַּשָּׂא (Mishlei 30:1) וְהָיָה אִם בִּן הַכּוֹת הָרָשָׁע (Devarim 25:2) שֶׁבִּן לַיְלָה הָיָה וּבִן לַיְלָה אָבָד (Yonah ...


19

Talmud Bavli (Sotah 12a): ותרא אותו כי טוב הוא תניא ר"מ אומר טוב שמו ר' יהודה אומר טוביה שמו רבי נחמיה אומר הגון לנביאות אחרים אומרים נולד כשהוא מהול וחכמים אומרים בשעה שנולד משה נתמלא הבית כולו אור "And she saw that he was good" (Shemos 2:2): R' Meir says his [Moshe's] name was Tov. R' Yehuda says his name was Tuvia. R' Nechemia says that he was to ...


18

Leib (as well as Label, Leibush and Loeb) is the Yiddish version of the German Name Loeb which means Lion (from the German for lion, Löwe). The English equivalent of this name is often Leo or Leon which are root in the Latin word for lion, leo. [Source: Kolatch, Alfred J. 1984. The Complete Dictionary of English and Hebrew First Names. Middle Village: ...


18

In the Shul I daven in the Gabbai's father Davens there often and the Rav told him to call him up Yaamod Avi Mori. I found that Sefer Dinei Kriyas HaTorah - Rabbi Naftali Hoffner says that you should call the father up as Yaamod Avi U'Mori........


18

Semikhah is the name of the process through which a rabbi is ordained in Rabbinic Judaism.


17

This is an old question so I doubt I'll get too many upvotes, but I figured that I should weigh in anyway considering my own name :-) Early Sources First, historical examples: on the one hand, there's a midrash (Vayikra Rabba 32) that states that the Jews merited to be saved from Egypt because they 'didn't change their name', among other cultural ...


17

In the sefer נפוצות יהודה, the explanation is given as follows: Yitzchak represents מדת הדין. Since it was this that was responsible for the destruction of the temples and our exiles, the Tanach hints that eventually, מדת הדין will be dropped in favor of מדת הרחמים in the time of redemption. Since the redemption consists of four stages, as alluded to by the ...


16

Yehoshua is always referred to in Tanach as Bin Nun. In Nechemia 8:17 he is referred to as יֵשׁוּעַ בִּן-נוּן. The only other case in Tanach where a person is called Bin is in Mishlei 30:1 דִּבְרֵי אָגוּר בִּן יָקֶה. However Rashi cites the Midrash that Shlomo is called Agur, meaning the one who gathered this information, "Bin" meaning not son here but that ...


16

You mentioned this verse in passing, but as far as I can tell, it provides complete and convincing proof that G-d is known by multiple names. Exodus 6:2-3, from Mechon Mamre: וַיְדַבֵּר אֱלֹהִים, אֶל-מֹשֶׁה; וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָיו, אֲנִי יְהוָה. וָאֵרָא, אֶל-אַבְרָהָם אֶל-יִצְחָק וְאֶל-יַעֲקֹב--בְּאֵל שַׁדָּי; וּשְׁמִי יְהוָה, לֹא נוֹדַעְתִּי לָהֶם ...


15

Yitzchak's name was bestowed by Hashem (Gen. 17:19). (Yerushalmi, Berachos 1:6) Actually, Rashi (first explanation to Gen. 25:26) says that Yaakov was also named by Hashem. Yefeh Mar'eh simply says that the Yerushalmi evidently agrees with Rashi's second explanation, that he was named by Yitzchak. Tov Ayin, on the other hand, suggests that the difference ...


15

The Shu"t Beit Avi (5:56) was asked this question and concludes that one should call him up as "Abba Isaac ben Moses" (for example). He says that by using the honorific "Abba" one alleviates the issue of calling one's parent by their first name (outlined in Shulchan Aruch YD 240:2). He notes that even though the Shulchan Aruch sounds like it is forbidden to ...


14

Naming children after the living is only discouraged among Ashkenazi Jews; among Sefardim it's not uncommon. (From Aish.com) Sephardi Jews also name children after relatives who are still alive. This source is from the Talmud, which records a child named after Rabbi Natan while he was still alive (Shabbat 134a) The reasons why Ashkenazim don't are: (...


14

Yoshke is simply a Yiddish diminutive nickname for Yehoshua (Joshua, for which a parallel English nickname would be Josh). Thus, it was simply a way for European Jews to make reference to Jesus in a manner that (a) conveyed the idea that Jesus was not viewed as important and (b) not likely to be picked up on by nearby Gentiles. I doubt there is any record ...


14

See here that the letter (chart on the right) that the letter tzaddi - צ - has one of the lowest frequencies in the Hebrew alphabet. Only tet is lower. That is from anywhere in the word. A better frequency chart would be for the start of words. In terms of vav, while it is frequent even in the beginning of words, this is only as a connective letter, meaning ...


14

From Dinonline.org: The Question: If someone is lo aleinu sick and adds a name to his existing name does he have to have written a new Kasubah? Answer: The Iggros Moshe (Choshen Mishpat 2:70:2) writes that if a person is not called by his new name, one does not write a new kesubah after a name was added due to illness. This is also the ...


14

Sefer B'Reshit: the Yerushalmi (Sotah 1:10) already refers to it as Sefer B'reshit. This is also found in the Zohar (Raya Mehemna Vol. II Parashat Mishpatim 119b). Sefer Sh'mot: The Midrash Lekah Tov (11th cent.) has a little rhyme at the end of Parashat Pekudei that refers to Sefer Sh'mot. More common is "Sefer V'eleh Sh'mot" found in many Midrashim (...


13

Ya'akov Avinu was known as an ish tam. Since they shared the first name Ya'akov (and possibly some personal character traits), one's appelation was applied to the other.


13

In the Torah we see the word Elokim used for both Hashem and other nations Gods (Elohim Acheirim). That proves that a word can have two meanings, and you still may use it. In addition the name Gad does not sound like God at all.


13

Hebrew Wikipedia has an extensive discussion on the matter. Also see Chapter 2 of יופי של עברית by אבשלום קור , כהנא, כגן, קוגן, קגן, כגנוביץ, קאהן, קון ,קיהן, כהנמן, כוהנר, ברכגן, ברקן , קצמן, כצובר Kahana, Kagan, Kogen, Kagen, Kagnovitch, Kahan, Kohn, Kihan, Kahanamen, Kohner, Brechgan, Barkan, Katzman, Katzover (the last two being later extensions of ...


13

In Bereishis Rabbah 37:10, R. Yose says: הראשונים על ידי שהיו מכירים את ייחוסיהם, היו מוציאין שמן לשם המאורע. אבל אנו שאין אנו מכירים את ייחוסינו, אנו מוציאין לשם אבותינו "The earlier generations, who knew their genealogies, would name after events. We, however, who don't know our genealogies, name after our ancestors." (Etz Yosef explains that the ...


13

Per Rabbi Shmuel Eliyahu it is not proper to give names such as Rephaela, Daniela, etc. כמו כן ראוי לא לקרוא לבת בשם הדומה בשורשו לשם של בן, כמו: רפאלה, דניאלה, שרונה, יוספה וכדומה. שזה עלול להפריע לילדה כשתגדל להיזכר תמיד על שם פלוני שעל שמו היא קרויה.‏


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


13

In terms of rabbis being willing to work with you, I don't think that would be a factor. I've talked with a lot of converts and conversion candidates, including one named Christina, and none of them reported any inquiry or hesitation based on factors beyond their control like what their parents named them. You will probably get some odd looks from other ...


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