Hot answers tagged

33

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


22

It turns out the most common name in the Tanach is Zecharayahu: A Kohen in the time of David (Divrei Hayamim 1:15:24) A Levite in the time of David (Divrei Hayamim 1:15:18) A gate-keeper in Ohel Moed (Divrei Hayamim 1:26:2) Son of Yishiyah (Divrei Hayamim 1:24:25) Father of Yado (Divrei Hayamim 1:27:21) Father of Yachziel (Divrei Hayamim 2:20:14) Son ...


18

Semikhah is the name of the process through which a rabbi is ordained in Rabbinic Judaism.


17

This is an old question so I doubt I'll get too many upvotes, but I figured that I should weigh in anyway considering my own name :-) Early Sources First, historical examples: on the one hand, there's a midrash (Vayikra Rabba 32) that states that the Jews merited to be saved from Egypt because they 'didn't change their name', among other cultural ...


17

Her name was אמתלאי בת כרנבו. ואמר רב חנן בר רבא אמר רב אמיה דאברהם אמתלאי בת כרנבו אמיה דהמן אמתלאי בת עורבתי וסימניך טמא טמא טהור טהור Bava Basra 91a (I knew it existed, but will admit to having resorted to Google to find it fast.)


16

Pitchei Teshuva YD 265:6 עיין בשו"ת תשובה מאהבה ח"א סימן ל"ה שאין להקפיד מלקרות שמות כשמות שהיה קודם אברהם אבינו ע"ה דלא כהמבי"ט ח"א סי' רע"ו שכתב דאין ראוי לקרוא בשם אדם או נח או שם ועבר דאין להעלות שם אלא מאברהם ואילך ע"ש דאין לחוש לזה שהרי מצינו רבי בנימין בר יפת ועקביא בן מהללאל וראובן קרא לבנו בכורו חנוך וכ"...


15

From Dinonline.org: The Question: If someone is lo aleinu sick and adds a name to his existing name does he have to have written a new Kasubah? Answer: The Iggros Moshe (Choshen Mishpat 2:70:2) writes that if a person is not called by his new name, one does not write a new kesubah after a name was added due to illness. This is also the ...


14

The Chida notes that no Tannaim or Amoraim were named Avraham (however, see mention of אברם חוזאה in Gittin 50a). The quote from the Chida follows (Shem ha-Gedolim in his entry for Mar R. Avraham Gaon): וראה זה חדש שלא מצינו בתנאים שבמשנה והבריתא תנא ששמו אברהם וגם מאמוראים לא מצאתי כעת בס' יוחסין... גם שם יצחק בתנאים שבמשנה לא יש מי ששמו יצחק, אך בבריתא ...


14

R. Mordechai Sasson, in his sefer דבר בעתו in the section called "רמזי מגלה", explains that Haman symbolizes the Yetzer Harah (evil inclination), and his ten sons allude to its ten bad character traits. Their death, brought about by Mordechai and Esther, represents the nullification of such evil traits by being overpowered by the Yetzer Tov (good inclination)...


14

See here that the letter (chart on the right) that the letter tzaddi - צ - has one of the lowest frequencies in the Hebrew alphabet. Only tet is lower. That is from anywhere in the word. A better frequency chart would be for the start of words. In terms of vav, while it is frequent even in the beginning of words, this is only as a connective letter, meaning ...


14

In terms of rabbis being willing to work with you, I don't think that would be a factor. I've talked with a lot of converts and conversion candidates, including one named Christina, and none of them reported any inquiry or hesitation based on factors beyond their control like what their parents named them. You will probably get some odd looks from other ...


14

Sefer B'Reshit: the Yerushalmi (Sotah 1:10) already refers to it as Sefer B'reshit. This is also found in the Zohar (Raya Mehemna Vol. II Parashat Mishpatim 119b). Sefer Sh'mot: The Midrash Lekah Tov (11th cent.) has a little rhyme at the end of Parashat Pekudei that refers to Sefer Sh'mot. More common is "Sefer V'eleh Sh'mot" found in many Midrashim (...


14

Having grown up in Egypt and knowing Arabic, I can tell you that Jews (like Muslims) freely use "Allah" in conversation to refer to God, although it is frequently replaced by "Rabbena" (Our Master). God is usually addressed directly as "Ya Rabb" (O Master).


13

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


12

From Rabbi S. R. Hirsch, Bereishis 4:1-2 Hevel, related to afel, afel, and aval, the basic conception of which is checking, restraining; that which restricts all light is afel, dark; the high wall which check access is efel, he'efil, to restrain yourself, to put yourself in opposition. aval, but, the particle of opposition, avel, grief, the feeling of a ...


12

I suspect that that refers to the Chazon Ish. The letters fit, and the Chazon Ish's rulings are often quoted alongside those of the Mishna Berura.


12

A Midrash in Vayikra Rabba (23:10) teaches: שְׁלשָׁה הֵם שֶׁבָּרְחוּ מִן הָעֲבֵרָה וְשִׁתֵּף הַקָּדוֹשׁ בָּרוּךְ הוּא שְׁמוֹ עִמָּהֶם, וְאֵלּוּ הֵן: יוֹסֵף וְיָעֵל וּפַלְטִי. יוֹסֵף מִנַּיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (תהלים פא, ו): עֵדוּת בִּיהוֹסֵף שָׂמוֹ, מַהוּ בִּיהוֹסֵף יָהּ מֵעִיד עָלָיו... יָעֵל מִנַיִן, שֶׁנֶּאֱמַר (שופטים ד, יח): וַתֵּצֵא יָעֵל לִקְרַאת ...


12

Even Ha'Ezer contains halachot about "דיני אישות", so it would seem that the name is a play on words from "אעשה לו עזר כנגדו" which describes Hashem's creation of Chava (and women in general). The phrase itself is mentioned twice in Shmuel 1 (4, 1 and 7, 12). It is indeed a "stone of help" - that's how Shmuel called it to signify "עד הנה עזרנו ה'", "until ...


12

There is no law (halacha) requiring a convert to choose a certain name. So it would appear as well from a responsum of one of our great authorities, R. Asher b. Jehiel (§15:4). Examples of converts having different names, are plentiful. In the old rabbinic literature we find converts bearing names such as Onkelos (BT Meg. 3a), Judah (Mishnah Yadaim 4:4 and ...


11

The Midrash (Bereishis Rabba 37:7) explains why in the times of Tanach, people would come up with "new" names based on events surrounding the birth, whereas nowadays we name people after the previous generations: רבי יוסי אומר: הראשונים על ידי שהיו מכירים את ייחוסיהם היו מוציאין שמן לשם המאורע, אבל אנו שאין אנו מכירים את ייחוסינו, אנו מוציאין לשם אבותינו. ...


11

Like many Anglicized versions of biblical names, the name Balaam comes through the Greek language of the Septuagint, which renders בלעם as βαλααμ. The reason the Septuagint spells it so differently from the Hebrew MT may either be due to limitations of the Greek language to accurately represent Hebrew, changes in the way Greek and/or Hebrew vowels were ...


11

The Rambam (Moreh Nevukhim Part III, 45) writes, concerning Mount Moriah: "The fact that the Torah does not make specific mention of it [Jerusalem], but rather hints at it and says, "…[the place] which God will choose" etc., appears to me to have three explanations. The first: so that the nations would not seize the place and wage power struggles over it, ...


11

The Ramban says the reason why his name is not mentioned is due to the fact that the city was small with few people living there, he was not famous. The Shaarei Aharon (from whom I am quoting all these answers) suggests that the names mentioned here are based on the evil nature of the people we are mentioning. Being that the king of Tzoar was not so evil ...


11

Medrash Esther Raba 3 says Charvona was called Charvona as he was responsible for the Churban Bais Hamikdash. חרבונא מופיע פעמיים במגילה - בתחילת המגילה הוא מופיע כאחד משבעת הסריסים המשרתים את פני המלך אחשרוש, ובסוף המגילה הוא מגלה לאחשורוש על העץ שהכין המן. חרבונא זהו שם פרסי (א' בסופו). אומר המדרש [אסתר רבה, ג] שמשמעות שמו - "אחריב ביתיה", לשון ...


11

Pischei Teshuva Y.D. 116:6 quotes Adnei Paz as permitting it, but then quotes the Adnei Paz's corrigenda as indicating that it should not be done for reasons of Ein HaRah (if both are alive) or inheriting a bad Mazal (if one has passed away). That latter view seems to be predominant in practice (see e.g.).


11

The Gemarah (Megillah 13a) states that the term Yehudi refers to one who rejects idolatry: רבי יוחנן אמר לעולם מבנימן קאתי ואמאי קרי ליה יהודי על שום שכפר בע"ז שכל הכופר בע"ז נקרא יהודי כדכתיב (דניאל ג, יב) איתי גוברין יהודאין וגו' The Maharsha cites the Gemarah in Sotah 10a that the name 'Yehuda' is meant to include the four letters of God's name. The ...


10

The first Rashi on koheles explains that Koheles means to gather like the word קהל. He also mentions that Koheles means that he gathered (אגר) all wisdom and threw it up (vomited it). Another explanation is that he spoke in a assembly format. Rashi text: ‏"קוהלת" - על שם שקיהל חכמות הרבה וכן במקום אחר קוראו (משלי ל) "אגור בן יקא" - שאגר כל החכמה ...


10

The Rebbe Rashab founded Yeshivas Tomchei Tmimim, whose purpose was that in it should be learned “G-d’s Torah, the exoteric and the esoteric, as a whole.” That is why the Yeshivah was called “Tomchei Tmimim,” and its students called Tmimim (Tmimim — plural of “tomim” meaning whole) — for there the synthesis of the exoteric and esoteric was manifest. Although ...


10

Berachos 12b-13a כיוצא בו אתה אומר (בראשית לה, י) "לא יקרא שמך עוד יעקב כי אם ישראל יהיה שמך" לא שיעקר יעקב ממקומו אלא ישראל עיקר ויעקב טפל לו Similarly we find "Your name shall not be called Yaakov any longer, rather Yisrael shall be your name" - not that the name Yaakov is uprooted from its place, rather that Yisrael is the primary ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible