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32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


23

Because "Alfasi" is really "al-Fasi". "Al-Fasi" is Arabic for "the Fezite" (Fez being the city in Morocco where he lived). So kind of like how the word "of" gets swallowed in "USA", the word "the" got swallowed in "Rif". Wouldn't have made much sense to make his acronym stand for "Rabbi Yitzchak The".


22

According to the sources cited by the Gra on Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah 147:3, the prohibition against mentioning the name of a foreign deity does not apply to the name of Jesus, and in fact we find that he is mentioned by name in many sources. In a very interesting teshuva, R' Esriel Hildesheimer discusses this issue at some length. He comments that the ...


18

In the Shul I daven in the Gabbai's father Davens there often and the Rav told him to call him up Yaamod Avi Mori. I found that Sefer Dinei Kriyas HaTorah - Rabbi Naftali Hoffner says that you should call the father up as Yaamod Avi U'Mori........


18

Semikhah is the name of the process through which a rabbi is ordained in Rabbinic Judaism.


17

This is an old question so I doubt I'll get too many upvotes, but I figured that I should weigh in anyway considering my own name :-) Early Sources First, historical examples: on the one hand, there's a midrash (Vayikra Rabba 32) that states that the Jews merited to be saved from Egypt because they 'didn't change their name', among other cultural ...


17

Her name was אמתלאי בת כרנבו. ואמר רב חנן בר רבא אמר רב אמיה דאברהם אמתלאי בת כרנבו אמיה דהמן אמתלאי בת עורבתי וסימניך טמא טמא טהור טהור Bava Basra 91a (I knew it existed, but will admit to having resorted to Google to find it fast.)


16

You mentioned this verse in passing, but as far as I can tell, it provides complete and convincing proof that G-d is known by multiple names. Exodus 6:2-3, from Mechon Mamre: וַיְדַבֵּר אֱלֹהִים, אֶל-מֹשֶׁה; וַיֹּאמֶר אֵלָיו, אֲנִי יְהוָה. וָאֵרָא, אֶל-אַבְרָהָם אֶל-יִצְחָק וְאֶל-יַעֲקֹב--בְּאֵל שַׁדָּי; וּשְׁמִי יְהוָה, לֹא נוֹדַעְתִּי לָהֶם ...


15

The Shu"t Beit Avi (5:56) was asked this question and concludes that one should call him up as "Abba Isaac ben Moses" (for example). He says that by using the honorific "Abba" one alleviates the issue of calling one's parent by their first name (outlined in Shulchan Aruch YD 240:2). He notes that even though the Shulchan Aruch sounds like it is forbidden to ...


15

From Dinonline.org: The Question: If someone is lo aleinu sick and adds a name to his existing name does he have to have written a new Kasubah? Answer: The Iggros Moshe (Choshen Mishpat 2:70:2) writes that if a person is not called by his new name, one does not write a new kesubah after a name was added due to illness. This is also the ...


14

Naming children after the living is only discouraged among Ashkenazi Jews; among Sefardim it's not uncommon. (From Aish.com) Sephardi Jews also name children after relatives who are still alive. This source is from the Talmud, which records a child named after Rabbi Natan while he was still alive (Shabbat 134a) The reasons why Ashkenazim don't are: (...


14

In Bereishis Rabbah 37:10, R. Yose says: הראשונים על ידי שהיו מכירים את ייחוסיהם, היו מוציאין שמן לשם המאורע. אבל אנו שאין אנו מכירים את ייחוסינו, אנו מוציאין לשם אבותינו "The earlier generations, who knew their genealogies, would name after events. We, however, who don't know our genealogies, name after our ancestors." (Etz Yosef explains that the ...


14

Yoshke is simply a Yiddish diminutive nickname for Yehoshua (Joshua, for which a parallel English nickname would be Josh). Thus, it was simply a way for European Jews to make reference to Jesus in a manner that (a) conveyed the idea that Jesus was not viewed as important and (b) not likely to be picked up on by nearby Gentiles. I doubt there is any record ...


14

See here that the letter (chart on the right) that the letter tzaddi - צ - has one of the lowest frequencies in the Hebrew alphabet. Only tet is lower. That is from anywhere in the word. A better frequency chart would be for the start of words. In terms of vav, while it is frequent even in the beginning of words, this is only as a connective letter, meaning ...


14

Sefer B'Reshit: the Yerushalmi (Sotah 1:10) already refers to it as Sefer B'reshit. This is also found in the Zohar (Raya Mehemna Vol. II Parashat Mishpatim 119b). Sefer Sh'mot: The Midrash Lekah Tov (11th cent.) has a little rhyme at the end of Parashat Pekudei that refers to Sefer Sh'mot. More common is "Sefer V'eleh Sh'mot" found in many Midrashim (...


14

Having grown up in Egypt and knowing Arabic, I can tell you that Jews (like Muslims) freely use "Allah" in conversation to refer to God, although it is frequently replaced by "Rabbena" (Our Master). God is usually addressed directly as "Ya Rabb" (O Master).


13

Hebrew Wikipedia has an extensive discussion on the matter. Also see Chapter 2 of יופי של עברית by אבשלום קור , כהנא, כגן, קוגן, קגן, כגנוביץ, קאהן, קון ,קיהן, כהנמן, כוהנר, ברכגן, ברקן , קצמן, כצובר Kahana, Kagan, Kogen, Kagen, Kagnovitch, Kahan, Kohn, Kihan, Kahanamen, Kohner, Brechgan, Barkan, Katzman, Katzover (the last two being later extensions of ...


13

Per Rabbi Shmuel Eliyahu it is not proper to give names such as Rephaela, Daniela, etc. כמו כן ראוי לא לקרוא לבת בשם הדומה בשורשו לשם של בן, כמו: רפאלה, דניאלה, שרונה, יוספה וכדומה. שזה עלול להפריע לילדה כשתגדל להיזכר תמיד על שם פלוני שעל שמו היא קרויה.‏


13

Its source may be the Arabic name Farida, which means "unique / precious" (as opposed to the Germanic name Frida, which means "peace"). [link]


13

The Chida notes that no Tannaim or Amoraim were named Avraham (however, see mention of אברם חוזאה in Gittin 50a). The quote from the Chida follows (Shem ha-Gedolim in his entry for Mar R. Avraham Gaon): וראה זה חדש שלא מצינו בתנאים שבמשנה והבריתא תנא ששמו אברהם וגם מאמוראים לא מצאתי כעת בס' יוחסין... גם שם יצחק בתנאים שבמשנה לא יש מי ששמו יצחק, אך בבריתא ...


13

In terms of rabbis being willing to work with you, I don't think that would be a factor. I've talked with a lot of converts and conversion candidates, including one named Christina, and none of them reported any inquiry or hesitation based on factors beyond their control like what their parents named them. You will probably get some odd looks from other ...


13

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


12

In "What's in a Name", the English translation of Zusha Wilhelm's sefer "Ziv HaShemot", the following is stated (Hebrew version with footnotes here): 1) Some say that one may name a male child after a female. (See Bris Avos 8:37; See also Koreis HaBris, Posach Eliyahu, note 8; See Kuntres HaShemos (revised edition), Vol 7, p. 10; See Sefer HaBris, p. 313; ...


12

A possible reason why we do not name children Yisro. Perhaps the reason we do not name Yisro is due to the fact that Yisro decides to return to Midian and ignores Moshe’s plea to remain with the Jewish people and help guide them into the Land of Israel. http://www.torah.org/learning/rabbiwein/5767/yisro.html


12

Kibbud Av VaEim UMoraam 6:11 cites two opinions on this subject. Chida and Sdei Chemed argue that indeed in that case the child should use a different title for his father; by contrast, the Ben Ish Chai (in his responsa Torah Lishmah) says that "Abba" is inherently a respectful title. (It is interesting, too, that we find the amora Shmuel calling his father ...


12

In "What's in a Name", the English translation of Zusha Wilhelm's sefer "Ziv HaShemot", the following is stated: Some are particular not to marry a woman whose name is the same as one’s own. (See Maasei Ish, Choshen Mishpat 7; See also Sdei Chemed, entry on Chasan VeKallah paragraph 7; See also Otzar HaPoskim, Even HaEzer end of ch. 2, and the Testament ...


12

To quote S. from On The Main Line: Rashi was known by Christians as Rabbi Solomon Jarchi (Yarchi) because of a mistake, the mistake being that it was thought that 1) he was from Lunel and 2) that the yud stood for ירחי, which was Hebrew for "from Lunel" (Lunel as in luna as in moon). This mistake was so entrenched that the Chida (page 6 in linked ...


12

Sephardi Jews is a general term referring to the descendants of Spanish and Portuguese Jews who lived in the Iberian Peninsula before their expulsion in 1492 by the Alhambra Decree. It can also refer to those who use a Sephardic style of liturgy, or would otherwise define themselves in terms of Jewish customs and traditions from the Iberian Peninsula. (...


12

R. Mordechai Sasson, in his sefer דבר בעתו in the section called "רמזי מגלה", explains that Haman symbolizes the Yetzer Harah (evil inclination), and his ten sons allude to its ten bad character traits. Their death, brought about by Mordechai and Esther, represents the nullification of such evil traits by being overpowered by the Yetzer Tov (good inclination)...


12

From Rabbi S. R. Hirsch, Bereishis 4:1-2 Hevel, related to afel, afel, and aval, the basic conception of which is checking, restraining; that which restricts all light is afel, dark; the high wall which check access is efel, he'efil, to restrain yourself, to put yourself in opposition. aval, but, the particle of opposition, avel, grief, the feeling of a ...


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