32

As Danny Schoemann says, it's a ketubah. A Ketubah is a Jewish marriage contract. The text in this form matches the standard text presented and translated on this Chabad.org page. People Groom: Yehuda Leib, son of Avraham Noah. He is also a Levi Bride: Toiba Rachel, daughter of Yisrael Arye Witness: Aharon Leib, son of Moshe the Levi Witness: Abba David, ...


30

The KJV may give the general sense of a translation in many cases. However, it has a definite Christian bend and does not always follow the Jewish traditions in translation. I will illustrate this phenomenon with a few examples. Isaiah 7:14 (see here): MT: לָ֠כֵן יִתֵּ֨ן אֲדֹנָ֥י ה֛וּא לָכֶ֖ם א֑וֹת הִנֵּ֣ה הָעַלְמָ֗ה הָרָה֙ וְיֹלֶ֣דֶת בֵּ֔ן וְקָרָ֥את ...


24

It certainly doesn't mean electricity! The truth is, we don't really know what it means. And whatever it is, studying it is dangerous! Some of you may recall the story in BT Hagiga 13a, where a child is studying Ezekiel, ponders over the meaning of hashmal, and was consumed by fire. You have been warned... From the context, it appears to be some kind of ...


23

R. Hoffman is using the German word for business school: Handelsschule. The question thus raised is: A father told his son to write in business school on the holy Shabbat. He does not want to and his mother told him that if he doesn't listen to his father and they quarrel in the house, she will kill herself (Lord help us). Should the boy obey his ...


19

"L'chatchila" means "from the outset", meaning that before one did action 'x' the halacha was that it was forbidden. However, if one was not familiar with that halacha and did action 'x' without knowing that there was a problem, then "b'di'eved" ("after the fact") the halacha might be different, meaning the consequences of what was done would change. In ...


19

Actually, the earliest rabbinic sources present the Greek translation (the Septuagint) in glowing terms. In the Mishna, Megillah 1:8, Rabban Shimon ben Gamliel is quoted as having said that Greek is the only language, other than Hebrew, in which it is permissible to write sifrei Torah. Commenting on this, the Jerusalem Talmud (Megillah 71c) says that the ...


18

There's no sin in translating Jewish texts (nowadays, at least). I have no source for saying so, but there's evidence in the vast amount of Jewish literature that has been translated into various languages. However: People sometimes can't be bothered to translate, especially because of the remaining reasons (below). Some words are very hard to translate ...


16

In British English, "corn" can mean any grain, not just maize (the plant native to America). See Merriam-Webster; Wiktionary.


16

My sister made this chart. It is kind of a condensed version of the hebrew one: And here's a version with the titles transliterated, instead of translated:


16

In the manuscript Parma 3173 there is no "מישראל"; In the manuscript Budapest Kaufman A50 no more; The Mishna of Mechon Mamre, Mishna Sanhedrin 4:5 based on Rambam manuscript idem; לפיכך נברא אדם יחידי בעולם, ללמד שכל המאבד נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו איבד עולם מלא; וכל המקיים נפש אחת, מעלים עליו כאילו קיים עולם מלא. ‏ In Shinuye Nussachaot Shas ...


15

The JPS 1917 translation is public domain. It can be found at http://www.mechon-mamre.org/p/pt/pt0.htm among other places.


14

Harry Orlinsky, editor-in-chief of the NJPS, in a 1990 essay pointed to the example of three texts in the KJV as being faulty and showing Christian bias: Genesis 1:1-3, Psalm 2:12, and Isaiah 7:14. The Isaiah 7:14 text has been discussed in the first post above and the one following, so only a discussion of the other two texts needs to be done. Genesis 1:1-...


13

The religious implication of this ketubah is that it may be possible to use it to establish, in a Jewish court, certain facts about the listed bride and groom: That they were Jewish. On this basis, their children would also be Jewish, as would any children of their daughters, of their daughters' daughters, etc. That the man was a Levi. On this basis, he, ...


13

Radak in Sefer Hashorashim (page 155 in this copy), explains that it refers to someone who is "young in years", without specifying an age. However, he continues, it can also refer to an attendant (since the young generally serve the elderly), or one who is young in wisdom (i.e. foolish). Thus, there is no definitive age referred to by the word נער, and it ...


12

Rashi, Radak, ibn Ezra and the M'tzudos all seem to say it means "you have caused me to hear" your command, i.e. informed me of it, though literally, yes, it means "you have dug me ears".


12

The Torah commands us regarding emotions all the time, e.g.: "Don't bear a grudge", "don't hate your fellow in your heart", "don't harbor resentment when you give [charity] to him", "because you didn't serve Hashem your Lord with happiness and a glad heart", "don't despise the Edomite, for he is your brother; don't despise the Egyptian, for you were a ...


12

Perhaps because not everyone translates "Mei Raglayim" as urine. The Shitah Mekubetzet (Chof-Chet) to Kritot 6A brings 2 translations of "Mei Raglayin". The first being actual urine, but the second being a grass with that name. And the name makes it an embarrassment to use it for service in the Beit Hamikdash. I also remember reading another explanation ...


11

There are two equally-valid ways of reading the verses (both found in classical commentaries): Abraham was sitting in the Elonei of Mamre, outside his tent at the heat of the day; when G-d appeared to him. Abraham then looked up and saw three men; [recognizing it was more important to do kindness to strangers right now than to sit and continue having his ...


11

The standard understanding is that it means "memory of" either way, just a question of how it's vowelized. (You'll find both vowelizations in different texts of Psalm 145, known to most of us as the daily "Ashrei", on the line "zecher rav tuvcha..."). But just for fun, the Gemara, (b. bathra 21a), records a discussion wherein Joab thought the commandment ...


11

Hebrew is the language of the Torah. The holy language. Translation inevitably creates a certain perspective on the text, as a Hebrew word can have multiple meanings or interpretations. A word for word translation would not make sense. The meaning often gets simplified, if not lost, in translation.


11

Wikipedia. As described there, Neusner has been criticized by the following scholars in his field of study: [Shaye J. D. Cohen, "Jacob Neusner, Mishnah and Counter-Rabbinics," Conservative Judaism, Vol.37(1) Fall 1983 p. 48-63] [Craig A. Evans, "Mishna and Messiah 'In Context'," Journal of Biblical Literature, (JBL), 112/2 1993, p. 267-289] [...


10

I think you are mixing up 3 different phrases. 1 ברוך אתה ה Baruch Attah Adonai. This phrase is commonly translated as "Blessed are you Lord," meaning "you, the Lord, are blessed" a statement of fact. It is used to begin most ritual blessings. 2 ברכו את ה המבורך Barechu et Adonai HaMevorach. This phrase means "Bless the Lord-who-is-Blessed." "Bless" here is ...


10

The Shulchan Aruch OC 145:3 says that: האידנא לא נהגו לתרגם, משום דמה תועלת בתרגום כיון שאין מבינים אותו: And nowadays the custom is not to translate [to Aramaic] because what benefit is there to do so since we do not understand it. Additionally, the Tur there quotes a Yerushalmi that says that the meturgeman is not me'ackeiv (prevents the fulfillment ...


10

In Beraishis 41 (45) Osnat is mentioned as the daughter of Potifera. Rashi comments there on the change of name. He says: Poti-phera: He is Potiphar, but he was called Poti-phera because he became emasculated since he desired Joseph for homosexual relations. — [from Sotah 13b]. So we see that he was not emasculated until he desired Joseph.


10

Emeritus Chief Rabbi Jonathan H. Sacks, "In Praise of Sefaria": "Sefaria is one of my favorite things in the entire contemporary Jewish world. It is taking cutting-edge technology and doing something very spiritual by it. What it is doing is opening up the rich treasury of our texts - we the people of the book, the people that never stopped writing and ...


10

KJV is definitely not considered most-accurate; at the bare minimum, it was not a direct Hebrew-to-English translation. KJV was intended to sound old, and to sound really good when spoken out-loud. The Jewish Publication Society translation of 1917 (JPS) is commonly-referenced, widely available (full text available at that link), and a good starting point, ...


9

There is at least one possible usage of קרח in Tanach in the sense of "ice" - Ezek. 1:22 (כעין הקרח הנורא), which Targum Yonasan translates as גליד חסין, "strong ice." [Metzudos also renders some other instances of קרח as גליד, the Talmudic word for ice (from the root גלד, as you noted), as in Mikvaos 7:1 and Bava Basra 20a.] To follow up on msh210's point, ...


9

וַתְּדַבֵּ֨ר מִרְיָ֤ם וְאַהֲרֹן֙ בְּמֹשֶׁ֔ה Separating Miriam as the subject of one clause from Aharon as the subject of another clause is not syntactically plausible for a couple reasons: They are joined by the cantillation marks, which delimit "Miryam v'Aharon" as a noun phrase. The second clause "Aharon was against" is missing a verb in the original. ...


9

the translation of the tatoo is the word "sun"


9

Most of the commentators understand ערוב as being derived from the word for "mixture", the animals being a "mixture" of a certain type. What type is subject to speculation. Shemos Rabbah (11:3) brings a difference of opinion between R' Nechemia and R' Yehuda as to what type of animals were involved: either insects or what we would think of as wild animals (...


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