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16

Harry Orlinsky, editor-in-chief of the NJPS, in a 1990 essay pointed to the example of three texts in the KJV as being faulty and showing Christian bias: Genesis 1:1-3, Psalm 2:12, and Isaiah 7:14. The Isaiah 7:14 text has been discussed in the first post above and the one following, so only a discussion of the other two texts needs to be done. Genesis 1:1-...


11

Emeritus Chief Rabbi Jonathan H. Sacks, "In Praise of Sefaria": "Sefaria is one of my favorite things in the entire contemporary Jewish world. It is taking cutting-edge technology and doing something very spiritual by it. What it is doing is opening up the rich treasury of our texts - we the people of the book, the people that never stopped writing and ...


8

The inscription reads "L'chaim," and means "to life." It is a well known toast in Hebrew/Yiddish.


7

It is the letters of the Hebrew alphabet (Aleph-bais) in order, but the letter samech (the fifteenth) is damaged, and the gimel (the third letter) looks like a nun, and the heh (fifth letter) looks like a hes. The first letter, Aleph, is near one of the points of the star, at around 11 o'clock in the photo. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:...


6

As Dr. Shmuel mentioned in a comment, this section is quoted here on page 24 footnote 86. There he elaborates: ר' שלמה קלוגר מצא שני כוונים אחרים של היתר ללמוד לאור הנר בליל שבת. התיר בנר שבעששית זכוכית, כיון שהזכוכית מהוה היכר לאיסור ההטיה (שו"ת האלף לך שלמה או"ח קט"ו) והתיר בנר שיש לו "שם לוואי", כגון 'נר שעוה' או 'מיללעליכט', כיון שהוא נבדל מנר ...


6

From what I've seen, the books available at https://chafetzchayim.org/ seem to be a fairly straightforward translation of almost all the works if the Chafetz Chaim. You can see for yourself if you like the format, as they have full and complete text documents of their work available for anyone to read. Here is the page for their Sefer Chafetz Chaim, scroll ...


5

Bardelas In a 2016 blogpost titled "Day of the Bardelas," R' Natan Slifkin writes about the bardelas in depth and proposes 3 options: (abridged- see blogpost for full version) Cheetah In Greek, it refers primarily to the leopard but also to the “lesser leopard” i.e. the cheetah. Hyena According to the Babylonian Talmud the bardelas is to be identified ...


5

I think that for the most part, Jewish translations of the Bible are made directly from the original Hebrew text into the given foreign language, rather than translated from one foreign language into another1. So, while it's likely that there are Jewish Bible translations out there in Aramaic, Arabic, Spanish, German, Russian, Yiddish, English, etc., most of ...


5

It’s the Hebrew alphabet, although the tenth letter (י - yud) is attached to the one preceding it and the fifteenth letter (ס - samech) is incomplete.


5

Let's divide the verse into two parts: נשאו נהרות ה'—נשאו נהרות קולם and ישאו נהרות דכים Each part is one sentence. The first one is broken up poetically by a caesura, around which both the subject and verb are repeated. So the reason "נשאו" and "נהרות" are identical in each of their appearances is simply that they are repetitions of the same word....


5

At lease according to some rishonim, any language other than Ancient Hebrew is not truly a language but rather an agreed upon method of communication (see the Ran in his commentary in the beginning of Masecta Nedarim, as well as the Raavad on the Rambam's hilchot kriyat shema 2, 10). According to the aforementioned opinion, using English letters (or any ...


5

Old French was simply the vernacular language of the great -perhaps the greatest- commentator of the Torah, RASHI, who lived in Troyes, France in the 12 th century CE. His most acknowledged skill was his capacity to explain each word, each sentence of Torah with a superior, yet unrivaled clarity.


5

Prisha to Tur Orach Chaim 288:14 explains: פי' מצלאין נוסח של ברכות הלועזים לחולים מתחיל מצלנא אנחנא כמו שמתחיל שלנו מי שבירך כו'‏ Matzla'in means a version of a foreign [Aramaic] blessing for sick people which begins maztlana anachna (we pray), analagous to how our prayers begin mi sheberach (He Who blessed). For a version of this prayer, see ...


4

Yevamot 4b ותנא דבי רבי ישמעאל כל בגדים צמר ופשתים הם ואמר רחמנא עביד ליה תכלת ותכלת עמרא הוא וממאי דתכלת עמרא הוא מדשש כיתנא תכלת עמרא הוא a Tanna of the School of R. Ishmael [taught]: Wherever ‘garment’ [is written] such as is made of wool or flax [is meant], and yet the All Merciful said that in them ‘purple’ shall be inserted, and purple, surely, ...


4

Dr. Michael Higger translated into English the following masechtos ketanos: Sefer Torah, Mezuzah, Tefillin, Zizit, Abadim, Kutim & Gerim. The translations were published in the back of his Hebrew edition, available at HebrewBooks here. While Soncino in fact also translated these listed, and others, I prefer Higger’s because he critically edited the ...


4

The Midrash Shmuel on Avot 3:7 says that the Tanna of the Mishna has Iyov 30:4 in mind, where the Targum says the verse is referring to someone who interrupts their learning to engage in worldly activities causes destruction to his food. The Tanna did not include the verse because this was common knowledge: From Sefaria: Iyov 30:4 הַקֹּטְפִ֣ים ...


4

My translation: But if the plaintiff is in this country and the defendant is in a different country, then he [the one acting as an agent of the plaintiff] performs a mitzvah, because there is no greater case than this of saving his fellow's money. For, were this not the case, anyone could take his fellow's money and abscond abroad.


3

Neither "do not kill" nor "do not murder" is really an accurate translation of "לא תרצח" (at least according to common understandings of those English words). There are certainly times when it's permitted (and even required) to kill people (e.g. executions, self-defense, war, etc.) so this is clearly not a blanket prohibition on killing. On the other hand, ...


3

See "Chizkuni" (Shemos 20:13) ולשון זה של "רציחה" לא שייך רק במיתה שלא כדין, אבל לשון מיתה ולשון הריגה, בין בדין בין שלא כדין Chizkuni differentiates between הריגה ("killing") and רציחה ("murder"). He states that "murder" only refers to killing when it is unlawful. But if a person kills lawfully, he does not violate the commandment. Accordingly, the ...


3

Jews today do not consider the King James Bible to be acceptably accurate. That said, it isn't as others have claimed "only a Greek translation," nor did they "ignore the source material." They also didn't 'make it sound old.' The King James Bible was a monumental undertaking with all relevant source materials (Hebrew, Greek, and Latin). However, as others ...


3

Literally means "master of the joy". In other words, he is the "owner" of the joyful event such as a wedding / Bar Mitzvah, etc. or, in short, the "host".


3

Here, from Sefaria, is the original Hebrew that the English segment you quote is a translation of: והטעם בכלאים כי השם ברא המינים בעולם בכל בעלי הנפשות בצמחים ובבעלי נפש התנועה ונתן בהם כח התולדה שיתקיימו המינים בהם לעד כל זמן שירצה הוא יתברך בקיום העולם וצוה בכחם שיוציאו למיניהם ולא ישתנו לעד לעולם שנאמר בכולם "למינהו" (בראשית א) והנה צוה סיבת המשכב ...


3

I can only answer you first question. Grammatically, נשאו is past tense while ישאו is future tense.


3

Rav Hirsch translates (actually his grandson translated into English from the original German) And Melchizedek King of Salem had brought out bread and wine but he was also a priest of the most high God. Rav Hirsch explains that this is to set him apart from the King of S'dom who came out with demands on Avram. The translation that you give above shows ...


2

The answer by SimchasTorah is depressing. "Hey Moshe, why are translating the Torah before we settle the land?" "Oh because you're going to get kicked out, scattered all over the world, and lose your native language." Ktav Sofer. "But don't worry. Take solace in your future exile because all languages come from Hebrew." Kedushat Levi (but please see the ...


2

I actually mentioned several answers to this question in an essay I wrote last year. This is just a synopsis of what I wrote, for my specific examples, I refer you to that essay. Malbim offers two ways of differentiating between the terms. First, he argues that the word yerusha is related to the word reshut (“domain” or “charge”) and simply denotes the ...


2

There are certain people for which the prohibition falls aside. (I’m not even referring to capital punishment here, or extralegal punishment performed by Beis Din.) One is obligated to kill in self-defense (Sanhedrin 72a) and if one is chasing after someone else to kill, rape, or some other of a specific list of sins (Sanhedrin 73a). With that category ...


2

The Ohr Olam Mishnah Berurah is an excellent translation of Shulchan Aruch Orach Chayim including Mishna Brura. Learning a few perakim there will familiarize you with the vocabulary of Shulchan Aruch. You can then use it as a reference for when you get stuck on specific expressions or words. You might also find a dictionary of abbreviations (e.g., here but ...


2

I suggest reading the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch first, especially the Kleinman Edition from ArtScroll with an elucidated English translation. That should introduce you to some basic terms repeated throughout the regular Shulchan Aruch.


2

Maurice has listed a wealth of sources that seem to collude on the idea that for the most part, one may pray in whatever language one understands. So, your question raises a good point. If your more comfortable with English, how do you know that your getting an accurate translation of the Hebrew? There's no 100% guarantee, but, I think you need to ...


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