14

Harry Orlinsky, editor-in-chief of the NJPS, in a 1990 essay pointed to the example of three texts in the KJV as being faulty and showing Christian bias: Genesis 1:1-3, Psalm 2:12, and Isaiah 7:14. The Isaiah 7:14 text has been discussed in the first post above and the one following, so only a discussion of the other two texts needs to be done. Genesis 1:1-...


10

Emeritus Chief Rabbi Jonathan H. Sacks, "In Praise of Sefaria": "Sefaria is one of my favorite things in the entire contemporary Jewish world. It is taking cutting-edge technology and doing something very spiritual by it. What it is doing is opening up the rich treasury of our texts - we the people of the book, the people that never stopped writing and ...


8

The inscription reads "L'chaim," and means "to life." It is a well known toast in Hebrew/Yiddish.


5

Sefaria provides a free Hebrew and English text of benching here, following the most common Ashkenazic custom. It's not formatted for printing, but it can be copied and pasted into a custom document. Chabad has a formatted Hebrew/English bencher PDF here, following the Chabad custom. As a PDF, it's not readily editable.1 1. Hat-tip to Salmononius2 for ...


5

Bardelas In a 2016 blogpost titled "Day of the Bardelas," R' Natan Slifkin writes about the bardelas in depth and proposes 3 options: (abridged- see blogpost for full version) Cheetah In Greek, it refers primarily to the leopard but also to the “lesser leopard” i.e. the cheetah. Hyena According to the Babylonian Talmud the bardelas is to be identified ...


5

I think that for the most part, Jewish translations of the Bible are made directly from the original Hebrew text into the given foreign language, rather than translated from one foreign language into another1. So, while it's likely that there are Jewish Bible translations out there in Aramaic, Arabic, Spanish, German, Russian, Yiddish, English, etc., most of ...


4

The terms used in Kol Nidrei are: Neder - a vow affecting an object (usually forbidding it in some way) or a vow to upkeep the Temple or gift to the altar. Issar - a vow that forbids or prohibits something. (Ex. "This loaf of bread is assur to me.") The Hebrew "Issar" means to bind or restrict. It can be a neder or shevuah etc. as long as it forbids. ...


4

Here is for the 5 books of Moses https://headcoverings-by-devorah.com/HebEngTaNaKhIndex.html


4

וְלֹא יִשְׁתּוֹמֵם can mean: To be numb or silent. In this context: He shouldn't sit around idly; it should always look like he's doing something productive. To do strange things that make other people wonder. In this context: He should act normally and not do strange acts. This is basically the Sefaria translation you quote: provided he does not go to ...


4

The text of Rambam paraphrases a verse in Kohelet 7.16 אַל תְּהִי צַדִּיק הַרְבֵּה וְאַל תִּתְחַכַּם יוֹתֵר לָמָּה תִּשּׁוֹמֵם Metsudat David למה תשומם. למה תעשה כזאת לשבת משומם מבלי בוא מי להתחבר עמך בעבור מרבית הפרישות ותהיה מובדל מן האנשים Why will you stay isolated, and nobody comes to bind with you, because of your excessive deprivation. You ...


3

This letter of Rambam was translated into English by Leon D. Stitskin, and published in Tradition in two parts. The first part was published in Vol. 16 No. 4 (Summer 1977) under the title "Maimonides' Maamar Kiddush Hashem" and is available in the archives as a PDF here. The second part was published in Vol. 14 No. 2 (Fall 1973) under the title "Maimonides ...


3

Neither "do not kill" nor "do not murder" is really an accurate translation of "לא תרצח" (at least according to common understandings of those English words). There are certainly times when it's permitted (and even required) to kill people (e.g. executions, self-defense, war, etc.) so this is clearly not a blanket prohibition on killing. On the other hand, ...


3

See "Chizkuni" (Shemos 20:13) ולשון זה של "רציחה" לא שייך רק במיתה שלא כדין, אבל לשון מיתה ולשון הריגה, בין בדין בין שלא כדין Chizkuni differentiates between הריגה ("killing") and רציחה ("murder"). He states that "murder" only refers to killing when it is unlawful. But if a person kills lawfully, he does not violate the commandment. Accordingly, the ...


3

No, the name שלום/Shalom is not one of the Holy names forbidden to erase: Rambam Yesodey Torah 6,2: only 7 names can't be erased/destroyed: ושבעה שמות הם השם הנכתב יו"ד ה"א וא"ו ה"א והוא השם המפורש או הנכתב אדני ואל אלוה ואלהים ואלהי ושדי וצבאות כל המוחק אפילו אות אחת משבעה אלו לוקה: "There are seven names [for God]: a) The name which is written Yud-...


3

It's God's name, followed by the word "סַלְעִי". We don't use the correct pronunciation of this one of God's names, substituting something like /ʔadoˈnaj/. "סַלְעִי" is something like /salˈʕi/. But pronunciation varies from person to person, as in any language. (Incidentally, this phrase appears in the third, not the second, verse of that psalm. For some ...


3

Al-harizi’s introduction to his translation of Maimonides’ commentary can found be found here in the standard Vilna edition of Berachot.


3

The most relevant translation into English I could find is probably Falasha Anthology by Wolf Leslau, which includes the Laws of Sabbath, Abba Elijah, Book of the Angels, Baruch, Apocalypse of Gorgorios, Testament of Abraham, Death of Moses, and Prayers. Many of the other books are available in any translation of the apocrypha and pseudepigrapha (for ...


3

Yevamot 4b ותנא דבי רבי ישמעאל כל בגדים צמר ופשתים הם ואמר רחמנא עביד ליה תכלת ותכלת עמרא הוא וממאי דתכלת עמרא הוא מדשש כיתנא תכלת עמרא הוא a Tanna of the School of R. Ishmael [taught]: Wherever ‘garment’ [is written] such as is made of wool or flax [is meant], and yet the All Merciful said that in them ‘purple’ shall be inserted, and purple, surely, ...


3

Firstly, many "precise" or more literal translations (e.g. the JPS translation) translate this word as "stranger" both times. In truth, it is possible that the meaning of convert comes from the meaning of stranger, since converts come from another nation, and are outsiders to some extent. When we look at it like that, the translations don't differ so much. ...


3

Jews today do not consider the King James Bible to be acceptably accurate. That said, it isn't as others have claimed "only a Greek translation," nor did they "ignore the source material." They also didn't 'make it sound old.' The King James Bible was a monumental undertaking with all relevant source materials (Hebrew, Greek, and Latin). However, as others ...


3

Click here for a bencher made by Aish HaTorah. It’s pretty well done, and, while it's a PDF, it's pretty easy to cut and paste into a Word document. The text is provided in Hebrew and English along with transliteration (classic Ashkenazi pronunciation).


3

Literally means "master of the joy". In other words, he is the "owner" of the joyful event such as a wedding / Bar Mitzvah, etc. or, in short, the "host".


2

The answer by SimchasTorah is depressing. "Hey Moshe, why are translating the Torah before we settle the land?" "Oh because you're going to get kicked out, scattered all over the world, and lose your native language." Ktav Sofer. "But don't worry. Take solace in your future exile because all languages come from Hebrew." Kedushat Levi (but please see the ...


2

I actually mentioned several answers to this question in an essay I wrote last year. This is just a synopsis of what I wrote, for my specific examples, I refer you to that essay. Malbim offers two ways of differentiating between the terms. First, he argues that the word yerusha is related to the word reshut (“domain” or “charge”) and simply denotes the ...


2

To add to David Kenner's answer, one of the fundamental principles in the laws of Nedarim (vows) is that any kinui of a neder is equivalent to the neder itself. That is, any shorthand or slang that people use in place of the word has equal force, following the principle that in vows we follow ordinary language, not any prescribed formulation (Nedarim 49a). ...


2

R. Eleazar of Worms (Rimze Haftarot, Parshat Shekalim, p. 4b) asserted that the etymology of the name is ‘despair’, for the people had despaired of Davidic reign (cited by Prof. Louis Ginzberg, Legends of the Jews vol. 6 p. 354). R. Eleazar’s connotation may have been predicated on the Bavli (BB 91b).


2

You can read the translation (with notes) of Prof. Abraham Halkin (‘Epistles of Maimonides Crisis and Leadership’) here. The translation is then followed by discussions of it by Prof. David Hartman.


2

There are certain people for which the prohibition falls aside. (I’m not even referring to capital punishment here, or extralegal punishment performed by Beis Din.) One is obligated to kill in self-defense (Sanhedrin 72a) and if one is chasing after someone else to kill, rape, or some other of a specific list of sins (Sanhedrin 73a). With that category ...


2

העוֹנה לתפלת חסיד [The One] who answers the prayers of the pious ידשׁן בּטוֹב חיינוּ [Pray, may He] improve our lives with goodness ושׁנה טוֹבה ישׁלח and send a good year לבית ישׂראל עמנוּ to our people, the House of Israel.


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