11

Erlau. They dress like Hassidim and they have a rebbe, who holds a tisch, but their traditions and minhagim are Chassam Sofer strictly (In fact, the Erlauer ravs are from the direct line of the Chassam Sofer, and their surname is in fact, Sofer.). They use Ashkenaz siddur, and their culture is an Oberlander culture. You'll also find, if you hang out ...


10

Aishel Avraham (Buchach) Orach Chaim 149 says that the reason that Minhag Ashkenaz returns the Sefer Torah before Ashrei on the weekdays was since there are some people that take off their Tefilin while they are saying 'יהי רצון שלא נבוש' which is in Uvo L'Tziyon and it is improper to remove Tefilin in front of the Sefer Torah therefore they return the ...


10

In the siddur Sefas Yisroel from OpenSiddur it is written: שיר מזמור לאסף has been recited since the end of the Geonic period - a few hundred years before the introduction of the שיר של יום. Its first appearance in אשכנז was in the מחזור ויטרי,* most likely as a result of the צרות and גזירות that were imposed upon עם ישראל at the time. And indeed it is ...


9

I studied in Brisk in Yerushalyim and what I saw from my Rosh Yeshiva and his family was that they use regular ashkenazi siddurim but by heart they incorporate their own nuschaos and minhagim (ie. most often following the Gr"a, for example, ommitting נא in the blessing of rachem in bentching. Also ברחמיו in Bonei Yerushalayim is omitted. However, they don'...


8

Aruch HaShulchan 268:14 explains that Shabbos is called in the Torah both masculine and feminine. כי קדש היא לכם מחלליה מות יומת is feminine. זכור את יום השבת לקדשו is masculine. In the Torah there is a feminine way of referring to evening (ליל) therefore we say "בה" then. Day (יום) is only masculine in the Torah therefore we say "בו". Mincha time which ...


8

Machzor Vitri - page 114 says we say the verse Orech Yamim twice in order to complete the name of Hashem that is produced by doing so. וכופלין אורך ימים כדי להשלים השם היוצא ממנו Tashbatz 258, Maharam says we say it twice this way it has the numerical value of Kohanim, since the Chashmonoim when they went to war said 7 times Vyehi Noam and twice Orech Yamim ...


8

The Aruch HaShulchan O.C. 207:2 defends and prefers the Mishna Brurah's nusach. The argument for the Mem is that in several places in the Torah we find Nefesh followed by a masculine verb, because when referring to the whole person, of which the Nefesh is a part, then the masculine should be used. Only when refering to the Nefesh distinctly as the part of a ...


7

The Lubavitcher Rebbe (Likutey Sichos 14 pg. 18) explains based on what is explained in Kabbalah that there are three distinct levels on Shabbos: 1) The night of Shabbos 2) The day of Shabbos 3) Mincha on Shabbos afternoon. On Friday night the world receives spiritual energy from the attribute of malchus. On Shabbos day there is an even higher revelation of ...


7

I have been compiling a German siddur for the past fifteen years. It is currently available on www.thebookpatch.com: http://www.thebookpatch.com/BookStoreDetails.aspx?BookID=19123&ID=0da30d3e-df41-4b72-bdbe-ee301d7f0000


7

The Siddur used by most German communities nowadays is the Sfas Emes Siddur published by Victor Goldschmidt Publishing. However, even at its first publication in 1799, the nusach had been changed to reflect some of the customs that were being practiced in Eastern Europe (Poland). You can get a copy of the Sfas Emes for yourself from Ephraim Rosenstock in ...


7

1) Keni was one of Yisro's names. (See Rashi who brings the Mechilta about his many names and Rashi further mentions there that he converted; Shmos 18:1) He is famous for exclaiming that now he knows that G-d is the greatest of any of the powers. (Shmos 18:11) The Midrash says that when Yisro said this, it was the final words G-d wanted to hear before ...


6

This idea may have an earlier source, but I found in the Nit'ei Gavriel (Rosh HaShana, ch. 2, fn. 33) that the recitation of the 13 middos causes HaShem to move to His throne of mercy (see also Rosh HaShana 17b), which is why all subsequent recitations are preceded by "Kail Melech Yoshaiv" ("Lord King who sits on the Throne of Mercy").


5

This 2011 link to the Siddur Tefillas Yeshurun metioned by yitznewton may be valuable to sign up for the new edition. You can also contact www.kayj.net You ask for printed editions. The following are available online. You could print what you wanted I suppose. A Category at the Wikimedia Commons for scanned works of Wolf Heidenheim, including a full set ...


5

Sephardi siddurim vary somewhat based upon the traditions they follow. For example, De Sola Pool's siddur is used in Spanish-Portuguese synagogues, while Moroccans while often use Siddur Darkei Avot. Some obvious variants include the texts of Havdalah. You can read more about these (and other) variants relevant section of Keter Shem Tob by Shem Tov Gaguine. ...


5

I've heard that Belz Chassidus uses Nusach Ashkenaz (or something close to it) for Shemoneh Esrei.


5

According to Sefer HaKushyos and other sources the reason is because the Torah is read by Shabbos Mincha. Although, this answer still requires further clarification. See https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B1NJHmIXg4QJZEQ2Rk04MkJUN3loRHN6Z1RWX3pQQQ Although regular Nusach Ashkenaz doesn't do this, the Vilna Gaon was of the opinion to do so which is why the ...


5

I've used Tfilon for a few years and really like it. It passes your shalom rav test. It has options for ashkenaz, sepharad, and eidei hamizrach. It is also very flexible - you can add names for holim, select which day(s) you celebrate purim, etc. It also auto calculates the special things like shir shel yom, yaaleh v'yavo, and other day specific things. It ...


5

Kipa.co.il links שים שָׁלום to the priestly blessing according to Orach Chayim 127 (2), so whenever there is a possibility for the priestly blessing, שים שלום is said. The trouble there is that there is no priestly blessing to Shabbos mincha and there is a minhag to say שים שלום (and another to say שָׁלום רָב). Kipa.co.il links the שים שלום minhag on ...


5

According to http://www.aishdas.org/asp/shalom-rav it is partly based on Nusach Bavel vs Nusach Eretz Yisrael Two variants of Shalom Rav were found in the Cairo Geniza. Given the similarities between Cairo and Israeli nusachos, it is assumed to have been the Nusach Eretz Yisrael in the days of the tannaim and Israeli amora’im. Another indication is ...


5

In Tefiloh Sefas Yisroel 1 Shacharit, note 63 on פּוֹתֵ֥חַ אֶת־יָדֶ֑ךָ it says “The ancient מנהג of touching and kissing the תפילין during, ”פּוֹתֵ֥חַ אֶת־יָדֶ֑ךָ...“, is cited by רב משה מאינץ”. This siddur is to be found here and is a nusaḥ Ashkenaz siddur dedicated to the memory of the Bad Homburg Jewish community and so probably relates to ...


5

Note: This answer is from the OP. Thanks to DanF, who pointed out that I should look on the website Beurei Hatefila for an answer, and to "go to that site when [I] have a tefilla-orientated question." First of all, my understanding of the Gemara in question (B'rachot 11b) was incorrect; the preferred wording of the paragraph is not "ahavah rabbah" but ...


4

An interesting example is the Yerushalmi shuls in Israel, who follow the customs of Tamidei HaGra. (I think the Tukachinsky luach mentions this custom.) They don't say Yotzrot or Krovot during the brachot of Shma or Shmone Esrei, but after Shacharit (and before taking out the Torah) they say the piyyutim.


4

All the shules under Rav Teitz in Elizabeth, New Jersey have said all Yotzros for over seventy years


4

The difference is indeed that between Biblical and Rabbinic Hebrew. At the end of the eighteenth and beginning of the nineteenth century c.e., there was a movement in Europe to apply Biblical (considered "classic" and more high-tone) rules of grammar to prayer. The advocates of this (among them the highly respected R Wolf Heidenheim) persuaded the editors ...


4

If you look at particular phrases (such as in the section between borchu and shma), and compare the vowels and punctuation, you will find differences in a variety of Ashkenazic siddurim. These differences (such as "b'safah vrurah uvin'imah, kedusha kulam k'echad onim" vs. "b'safah vrurah, uvin'ima kedosha, kulam k'echad onim") reflect slightly different ...


4

Vien chassidim(oberlander Jews) Daven Ahskanaz even though some switched to sefard . They also initially wore homburg hats not shtreimals which chassidim traditionally wear.


4

Siach Tefila question 137 & 138 indicates as follows. If one is in the midst of the actual Tachanun (the part where you place your head on your arm) then he should finish the Tachanun, however if one is in any other part then he should stop and say Vayehi Bin'soa.


4

In Ashkenaz today [the situation was different in different communities in the past]: Me'ora - Before or chodosh. Ahava - different minhogim, either before v'keiravtanu or before l'hodos lecho. Maarivim Short piyut before end of first berocho, Same with second; long piyut before בגילה ברינה בשמחה רבה ואמרו כלם, short piyut before זה צור ישענו פצו פה ...


4

You find this a lot in older Sefarim. Usually you can find these in the margin closest to the binding - often hidden in the binding. It seems that this was how they differentiate between versions. Like between Pessach, Sukkoth and Shavuoth Machzorim, which use plenty common pages. In the case of the Machzor Rabba, they really used the same text for both ...


4

Pages 506-517 (LI - LXII) at the end of the link discuss the historical evolution of Kaddish and the relevant points vis a vis the "Minhag Ashkenaz" in the siddur. In relation to the possukim after Aleinu, on page 517: (And p84 internal siddur numbering, p93 pdf reader numbering, end of weekday Mincha) it says According to Minhag Ashkenaz, the possukim "...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible