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In general, a Jew is permitted to benefit from the melacha (forbidden Shabbat labor) a non-Jew does for himself or for other non-Jews. R Daniel Braude (Learn Shabbos, pp. 521ff) writes that a Jew can benefit from a melacha performed by a non-Jew for himself (if there is no need for more melacha to benefit the Jew), e.g., switching a light is fine as the non-...


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Shmos 35:3 You shall not kindle fire in any of your dwelling places on the Sabbath day." First of all, only the Karaites forbid leaving a flame already burning. Second, this is a commandment that applies only outside the Temple. The commands to bring the sacrifices and keep the menorah burning are explicit in the Torah and thus apply on the Sabbath as ...


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R Doniel Schreiber answers your question here (point #6) In the period of early Shabbat when most Jews have not yet accepted Shabbat, one who has accepted Shabbat is permitted to ask non-Jews to perform melakha for him even if it is not for the purpose of a mitzva. However, once most Jews have accepted Shabbat, it is permitted only if it is for the needs of ...


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This is indeed the custom as recorded by the Rema in SA YD 376:4 The mourners recite Kaddish even on the Sabbath and Festivals, but it is not customary for them to lead the services on the Sabbath and Festivals, although there exists no prohibition against [this] matter. Commentators note the conflict between the elevated level of joy in the prayers and ...


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The Rashbam in Bava Basra 121A, says that all holidays are called Shabbos Shabooson (and they are made by bais din when they are mekadesh the chodesh) therefore they called the weekly shabbos, shabbos bereishis since it's been made holy from the six days of creation as the passuk says "vayikadesh"


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In Nitei Gavriel on Hilchos Aveilus (cheilek alef) perek 117 he notes that when davening Mincha by the house of an aveil, there are mixed minhagim. The case for saying we do, appears to have more support (refer to footnote 3): Pri Megadim, OC 131, Eishel Avraham, S"K 10 notes because "אין מידת הדין מתוחה" - "we do not invoke the ...


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I will not deal with the issue you had with Safek Pikuach Nefesh as not enough details were given. I will deal mainly with the issues of Kosev relating to an electronic screen. The recent Poskim have different opinions. Rav Elyashiv who is quoted in שבות יצחק חי"ב סוף עמ' י"ז says that it is Biblical. He explains that there is no Petur of Eino ...


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Halachic decisors prohibit ordering something which is guaranteed to be delivered on Shabbat in normal circumstances (see the last paragraph for exceptions). R Doniel Neustadt explains the general principle (here) Amirah l’akum, giving instructions to a non-Jew to do an action which would be forbidden for a Jew to do on Shabbos, is prohibited. It makes no ...


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I would say the norm is that even if one regularly prays in a early minyan, occasionally they can pray in a later minyan if they are running late. Therefore one would not suspect his neighbour of being Mechalel Shabbos. Regarding Gentiles seeing him do Melacha, R' Moshe Feinstein writes in Igros Moshe Orach Chaim 1:96 that Maris Ayin means someone thinks ...


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The following are very helpful explanations, from more synthetized to more detailed Halacha Yomit R Doniel Neustadt at torah.org R Eliezer Melamed in Peninei Halacha, if you ignore the sources this is the more pedagogical treatment of the topic. You can start with chapters 1 & 2 for a very good ovewview The problem of the laws of muktzeh is that they ...


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I'm a big fan of Rav Shraga Kallus, a Rosh Kollel and Rebbi in Yeshivas Torah Ohr in Eretz Yisroel. He has a fantastic website with all of his shiurim, including a whole series on Muktzeh here


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Rabbi Doniel Braude has written a very well received book on Hilchos Shabbos called Learn Hilchos Shabbos in Just 3 Minutes a day. This book is based on his daily 1 Minute Halacha email. One can sign up at https://www.torahcoach.net/#mailing-list and check the archives where he has done an excellent job of simplifying Hilchos Shabbos.


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Chabad.org explains the concept. Muktzeh (lit., “set aside”) refers to items that may not be moved or handled on Shabbat, the Jewish day of rest. One of the most famous Shabbat-related rabbinical injunctions, muktzeh was instituted to preserve the state of restfulness of this sacred day. The laws of muktzeh are codified in the Code of Jewish Law in the Laws ...


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See here an answer here: https://dinonline.org/2010/06/29/using-pool-as-mikva/ It is preferable to immerse in a rabbinically approved mikva; however, when such a mikva is not available, or under extenuating circumstances, is it acceptable to use a swimming pool as a mikvah. This answer is specifically for men, for whom immersion is only a “custom.” Women ...


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