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21

As part of the extensive research behind my RASHI'S DAUGHTERS, no subject intrigued me more than the elusive [and ubiquitous] legend that they wore tefillin. Indeed, when I first started studying Talmud and was introduced to Rashi, I was told that legend held that they were learned and wore tefillin. I actually tracked the earliest mention of this back to ...


18

A non-Jew certainly may wear tefillin (in other words, there is no law against them doing so), but they will not be fulfilling a mitzvah. From that perspective, they might be viewed in the same way that one views a Jewish woman who lays tefillin: the Shulchan Arukh (Orach Chaim 38:3) exempts her but allows her to wear them if she wishes. Note, however, that ...


18

The Talmud (Arachin 3b) informs us that the Kohanim were exempt from wearing the Tefillah shel Yad while servicing in the Temple because it would constitute a separation between the priestly garments and the skin. The Tefillah shel Rosh could still be worn, and the priestly garments on the head were worn in such a way as to leave room in the front for the ...


17

According to this article by Rabbi Dr. Ari Z. Zivotofsky (published in the Orthodox Union's Jewish Action Journal, Summer 2011), such a source does not exist. Apparently, this idea appeared in the late 20th century, and never before then.


16

The part of the arm that matters when counting the number of loops around the arm is from the elbow to the wrist. The Chabad custom is to wrap the straps so that there are 6 complete loops and 2 half loops. This equals 7 complete loops, but may look like one is wrapping 8 loops. As you can see from this picture from Chabad.org's article about Tefillin, the ...


16

The Mishna in Menachot 4:1 states: תפלה של יד אינה מעכבת של ראש ושל ראש אינה מעכבת של יד The hand Tefillah does not prevent the head Tefillah, nor does the head Tefillah prevent the hand Tefillah. So you definitely still wear the head Tefillah no matter what happens to your arms. The Mishna Berura writes (OC 27 sk 1) that if one put tefillin on the ...


15

The Mishnah Berurah there (s.k. 28) explicitly addresses your question. ואפילו לאותן המניחין תפילין בחוה"מ בלי ברכה או המניחין תפלין דר"ת אחר שחלץ תפלין דרש"י או שחלץ תפלין ע"מ להחזירן דהרמ"א בסי"ב פסק דא"צ לחזור ולברך כשמניחן אח"כ אפ"ה עבירה היא להסיח ביניהן דלכתחילה בעינן שיהיו סמוכין ותכופין זה לזה דכתיב והיה לך לאות על ידך ולזכרון בין עיניך שיהא הוייה ...


14

Rabenu Tam (as cited in paragraph 6 of the Rosh's laws of sefer Tora) holds that ink made of gallnuts (which we use even in 'his' t'filin) is no good. Also, Rabenu Tam (as cited in Tosafos to M'nachos 33:1 s.v. "Ha daavida") holds the parchments must be lying flat in their case, and we put them upright (per SA OC 32:45), and even in 'his' t'filin.


14

The Rama rules (OC 27:4 based on Teshuvat HaRashba 1:827) that there is only a problem of a chatzitza (separation between the tefillin and the skin) under the boxes not the straps. The Mishna Berura there (sk 16) notes that most later authorities only accept this for the parts of the straps that do not directly relate to the tying (ie. the parts between the ...


14

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 40:8) rules that אכילת עראי temporary eating is permitted while wearing Tefillin. Drinking water would seem to fall in this category.


12

I am a Sofer Stam and I can tell you that although there is an inyan in Kabbalah to cover the tefillin shel yad, that is not the reason for the plastic cover. It is to protect the corners of the bayit from getting worn down from years of rubbing against your clothing. In places where there is Birchat Cohanim every day, some Cohanim put a similar cover on ...


12

Keset HaSofer 21:14 rules that you can't put ground ivory into the tefillin paint as it is not from a kosher animal (an elephant). Accordingly, it would seem that one would need to make sure to use paint that has a certification ensuring that all ingredients are from kosher species.


12

It's not clear. Of course even today there are a few rare people who do so. The Shulchan Aruch Orech Chaim 37:2 brings that it no longer the custom because of the difficulties of maintaining the proper focus and self-control all day, so by then (mid 1550's) it was clearly not the typical practice. In Halacha 25 of the Rambam's Mishneh Torah Tefillin, ...


12

The Gemara states this (and the reasoning behind it) explicitly on Menachot 36a: תנא כשהוא מניח מניח של יד ואחר כך מניח של ראש וכשהוא חולץ חולץ של ראש ואחר כך חולץ של יד בשלמא כשהוא מניח מניח של יד ואח"כ מניח של ראש דכתיב וקשרתם לאות על ידך והדר והיו לטוטפת בין עיניך אלא כשהוא חולץ חולץ של ראש ואח"כ חולץ של יד מנלן אמר רבה רב הונא אסברא לי אמר קרא והיו ...


11

The Tefillin of Rabbenu Tam were written by R' Zirkind, at the special request of R' Moshe. These tefillin were checked by my rebbe, Rabbi Shmuel Schneid, who told me that the tefillin were written in typical Russian Beis Yosef script. As any sofer experienced with Sifre Torah of the world will tell you, before 1948, each country and Edah had their unique ...


11

From my research, it seems Jake is correct. I looked into this inyin a couple years ago when helping write a Bar Mitzvah pshetl on the subject of the Shel Yad being covered and the Shel Rosh being uncovered. At the time I heard from both my Rov as well as from a Sofer (who is also a Talmud Chochom) that the requirement to cover the Shel Yad (as WAF ...


11

I wrap it seven times, but have been told I wrap it eight times because people count differently than I. That is, from the elbow, I wrap it half a time, seven full times, and whatever's necessary to bring it around again (i.e., another half). So it's seven, see? No, really. Seven. Count 'em. No, count 'em this way. :-) As to why I put the extra halves, I ...


11

It is a halacha l'Moshe miSinai that the r'tzu'os must be black (M'nachos 35a), and this is a requirement for valid t'fillin. The straps must be re-blackened if the paint becomes scratched or abraded (Bach OC 32:25). Abrasions are especially common (if not readily noticeable) in the vicinity of the knot of the shel yad, and special attention should be paid ...


11

There is much discussion in Jewish literature about this subject, and there is also a difference between a woman wearing a tallit and tefillin. It is easy to show what the Gemara and the Rema say, but leaving out all of the rishonim and acharonim on the topic would prevent learning where the halakha stands. But here is a start. Regarding tefillin Mishna - ...


11

Tefillin may not be donned on Shabbat and Yom Tov (Menachot 36b, Shulchan Aruch OC 31:1). Rav Yosef Karo (ibid :2) rules that the days of Chol HaMoed are included in this prohibition, but Rav Moshe Isserlis rules they are not included and Tefillin should be worn. Modern customs vary widely on the latter point and one's personal rabbi should be consulted ...


11

Taamei Haminhagim - page 548 / קע"ז & page 549 says that since when we say Poseach Es Yadecha we are supposed to have in mind the Roshei Teivos פא"י and the Sofei Teivos חת"ך which are the Shaimos of Parnasa. Therfore we put our hands on the Tefilin at this point to show that we are only requesting Parnasa in order to be able to do Mitzvos.


10

I don't know whether he personally did, but he does mention this custom in his siddur, and gives the Zohar as the source. (It states that the seated part of davening corresponds to the shel yad, and the standing part - primarily Shemoneh Esrei, I guess - to the shel rosh.) Dayan Raskin, in his notes to the siddur there, has an extensive discussion of this ...


10

Yes, there are standard sizes, though obviously there are usually going to slight variations in fit for every pair of handmade tefilin. The sizes seem to be measured by cm2 millimeters. Based on my experience they tend to err towards a looser fit; I usually adjust this by adding a sticker or a piece of paper on the inside. This piece is sometimes called a "...


10

The Rambam in Hilchos Melachim 10:9-10 says a non Jew cannot keep shabbas ,but if he wants to perform other mitzvos for its reward it is permissible but has to be performed in the correct manner. exact wording: בן נח שרצה לעשות מצוה משאר מצות התורה כדי לקבל שכר. אין מונעין אותו לעשות כהלכתה. ואם הביא עולה מקבלין ממנו. נתן צדקה מקבלין ממנו. ויראה לי שנותנין ...


9

The Shearim Metzuyanim B'Halacha brings a Machlokes whether one should wear Tefilin at a Bris. The Shach, Magein Avraham, Chida, Taz and others say you should. However the Aters Tzvi and others say you should not.


9

Rashi in Rosh Hashanah 33a holds that women may not perform mitzvot in which they are not obligated because of "bal tosif." ד"ה הא נשים מעכבין. דפטורות לגמרי דמצות עשה שהזמן גרמא הוא וכי תקעי איכא בל תוסיף Although Rashi's opinion rejected by most Rishonim, it does seem to make the story that his daughters wore tefillin more unlikely. (Tosafot in Eiruvin ...


9

According to R. Yosef Karo's uncle, R. Yitzchak Karo, the Sephardic practice prior to the Zohar was like the Rosh, to wear tefilin with a bracha (quoted in שו"ת בית יוסף, תש"כ, עמ' שפה). The Beit Yosef (או"ח סי' לא) cites the Rashba in addition to the Zohar, as the source for the change in Sephardic practice. It isn't clear what Sephardic practice was prior ...


9

The premises of your question appear to be incorrect. The Rambam (Hil. T'fillin 4:5) says to first put on the shel yad (phylacteries of the arm) and to then put on the shel rosh (phylacteries of the head): וקושר של יד ואחר כך מניח של ראש Translation: And he should bind the arm phylacteries [to his arm] and afterwards don the head phylacteries. The ...


9

The Targum Yonasan to the verse prohibiting a woman to wear men's gear says specifically it includes Tallis and Tefilin. However, that doesn't seem to be the prevailing opinion. The Aruch HaShulchan and Rav Moshe Feinstein both address the issue of women wearing Tefilin, and neither of them concludes that it's prohibited because of that Targum Yonasan. At ...


8

Today we don't treat the second day of yomtov as a "maybe it's yomtov"; it has been rabbinically enacted for us (non-Israel-dwellers) as a full-fledged yomtov. The Talmud established long, long ago that rabbinic law has the power to order someone to be passive rather than fulfill a Torah obligation, e.g. not putting on tefilin on 2nd day yomtov (or not ...


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