14

On a simplistic level, Chochmah is Wisdom. It is an ability or attribute of a person. Bina is Understanding. It is the use of Chochmah to understand something. Daas is Knowledge. It is the acquired idea that one has understood with Chochmah through Binah. But this isn't Hebrew.SE! You want a Jewish Theology answer, else you wouldn't have used the term "...


7

Rashi explains the difference as follows (Shemos 31:3): וָאֲמַלֵּא אֹתוֹ רוּחַ אֱלֹהִים בְּחָכְמָה וּבִתְבוּנָה וּבְדַעַת וּבְכָל מְלָאכָה - And I have imbued him with the spirit of G-d, with wisdom, with insight, with knowledge, and with [talent for] all manner of craftsmanship with wisdom: [I.e.,] what a person hears from others and learns. -[...


6

Nusach Sfard (not to be confused with Nusach Sefaradit Or Edot HaMizrach) is the nusach (that contains many Kabbalistic inyanim) used by families and communities who ancestrally were influenced by the teachings of the Ba'al Shem Tov (founder of the Chassidus movement) and his many students. Nusach Sfard is primarily used by (Ashkenazi) people who originate ...


6

This idea may have an earlier source, but I found in the Nit'ei Gavriel (Rosh HaShana, ch. 2, fn. 33) that the recitation of the 13 middos causes HaShem to move to His throne of mercy (see also Rosh HaShana 17b), which is why all subsequent recitations are preceded by "Kail Melech Yoshaiv" ("Lord King who sits on the Throne of Mercy").


5

Sephardi siddurim vary somewhat based upon the traditions they follow. For example, De Sola Pool's siddur is used in Spanish-Portuguese synagogues, while Moroccans while often use Siddur Darkei Avot. Some obvious variants include the texts of Havdalah. You can read more about these (and other) variants relevant section of Keter Shem Tob by Shem Tov Gaguine. ...


5

The only specific detail in nusach that I can think of for which the Rebbe made a particular point, was to say "melech yachid chei ha'olamim" in Yishtabach in order to mirror the text of "Baruch Sheamar." I suppose there are some other points in davening with a very strong attribution to the Baal Shem Tov (in whose house the Rebbe grew up) for which many ...


5

The following is a condensation of the explanation in the book שער הכולל (page 25, paragraph 19): The brakhah Emet ve-Yatziv is known to have the nature of being a blessing of hoda'ah (thankful acknowledgment), not baqashah (petition), so that that line of poetry, which is petitionary, seems like an insertion that doesn't fit.


5

Note: This answer is from the OP. Thanks to DanF, who pointed out that I should look on the website Beurei Hatefila for an answer, and to "go to that site when [I] have a tefilla-orientated question." First of all, my understanding of the Gemara in question (B'rachot 11b) was incorrect; the preferred wording of the paragraph is not "ahavah rabbah" but ...


4

Gur Tefillin: Square knot (edit: some wear single dalet) , Shel Yad Ashkenaz, Wrapping also Ashkenaz way, Brachos on both must be said standing. Ksav: Ari Zal with Shin of Beys Yosef which is called a Polnisher Shin. Ratzuos from shel rosh goes down, and behind the gartel then we wrap once and going "outside" way Gartel must be tight high, on the level ...


4

I have been trying to reconnect to my Gerrer roots. This is what I've discovered. Tefillin: They are standard size, not oversize like Chabad. The parchments are k'sav Beis Yosef (source: a Gerrer who related that to me with a story from his yeshivoh days). The laying of Rabbeinu Tam tefillin is added from marriage. They are wrapped standard nusach ...


4

The Koren Sacks Siddur is Nusach Sepharad, that is to say, the "Spanish-Portuguese" rite. Nusach Sefard is a variant similar to Ari which bears more similarity to Edot HaMizrach and Ashkenaz to Sepharad. The main differentiating point between Sepharad and Sefard is in Kabbalat Shabbat; in Sepharad, Bameh Madlikin is said, whereas in Sefard, and by extension ...


4

If you look at particular phrases (such as in the section between borchu and shma), and compare the vowels and punctuation, you will find differences in a variety of Ashkenazic siddurim. These differences (such as "b'safah vrurah uvin'imah, kedusha kulam k'echad onim" vs. "b'safah vrurah, uvin'ima kedosha, kulam k'echad onim") reflect slightly different ...


4

In the Amidot of the Yamim Nora'im, in the blessing Kdushat Hashem, in Nusah Sfard four paragraphs beginning ובכן are added. In Nusah Ashkenaz, three are added. In Avinu Malkeinu on Rosh HaShanah, in Nusah Sfard the custom is to omit the petitions that mention sin (I don't know if this is true for all editions of Nusah Sfard). In Nusah Ashkenaz the ...


4

See here where they suggest: 1 they often daven until after shkiya, and according to many opinions tachanun may not be said after shkiya, so a blanket rule was instituted so as never to come to saying after shkiya, which in some kabbalistic sources danger is associated with this practice. 2 tachanun by mincha requires intense concentration, ...


3

Note: Not all Sefardim have the same Nussach, and not all Ashkenazim have the same Nussach. And this answer ignores the Chasidish [a.k.a. Sefard] Nussach which is a mix of the 2, at some level. And then there's the Nusacch from Teiman. To answer your broad Ashkenazi vs. Sefardi Nussach: The general structure of the Tefilot are the same - Shacharit, Mincha, ...


3

The Steipler kept his chassidish tefillin but bought Rav Chaim Ashkenaz Tefillin, although the steiplers father was a hornsteipler (chernoybl) chossid, the steipler learnt in navordok, a litvishe yehsiva and married THE litvish'e gadols sister (Chazon Ish's sister). I am pretty sure he continued to wear a gartel (but then again so did the chazon ish, it ...


3

The Aruch HaShulchan (OC 62:1) in discussing how exact one must be when reading the Shema writes: וכך שנו חכמים במשנה (טו א): קרא ולא דקדק באותיותיה – יצא. ופירש רש"י: שלא דקדק לפרשן יפה בשפתיו. עד כאן לשונו. ואין הכוונה שלא פירש התיבות והאותיות כלל, כגון שאמר חצי תיבות וכיוצא בזה. דוודאי בכהאי גוונא לא יצא, שאין זה קריאה כלל. אלא כוונתו כמו שפירשו ...


3

The source of saying this סברי formula is the שבלי הלקט in סימן קמ, quoted in בית יוסף אורח חיים קסז ד''ה כתוב. His original formulation is 'סברו מורי'. He explains that when one person wanted to be מוציא others in the ברכה of wine in the middle of the סעודה, he had to get the other people's attention first so they could swallow what they were eating and ...


3

I do believe that those followers of Rabbi Chaim Avraham Dov Ber Levine HaCohen (the Malachim) also daven the Chabad nusach. This is anecdotal, as I went to yeshiva with someone whose family identified with this group and he used a Tehillat haShem siddur.


3

Nusach Sefard is the name for the many versions of the Hasidic siddur, so yes, these siddurim are Hasidic in nature. However, they do not fit into a particular Hasidic sect as a whole, although I am sure there are some shtiebels out there that use them. I own both Siddur Tefillas Shlomo and Siddur Eitz Chaim, and I can attest that they are exactly the same ...


3

The biggest difference is that there is an entirely different Avoda. Ashkenazim say אמיץ כח, while Sefaradim say אתה כוננת. Some prayer books (at least Koren and artscroll) include the second version as an appendix. Apparently, apart from אמיץ כח, some German Jews said a different version beginning אשוחח נפלאותיך, while French Jews used to say another ...


3

Ta'amei HaMinhagim 390 writes: טעם שאין אומרים ישמחו במלכותך בתפילת מנחה מחמת היות עת פטירת הצדיקים ערבה השמחה The reason that we don't say yismechu vemalchutcha during minchah is since it is the time when the righteous passed away, the joy is tempered. He later specifies that the righteous who passed away on shabbat afternoon were Yosef, Moshe and ...


3

There is a concept found in Kabbalistic/Chassidic literature that ahavah rabbah, unlike ahavat olam, is available only on the ethereal plain of Atzilut, which is inaccessible to us. I do not understand this stuff at all, but I can point you to where it says this in the Tanya (Part One, The Book of the Average Men, Chapter 43, #2): והנה, באהבה יש גם כן שתי ...


3

Some comments on the question have disputed whether you're right that an inordinate number of Ashkenazic synagogues in Israel use nusach "S'farad". I haven't seen statistics on point, but my limited experience tells me that you're right, specifically about such synagogues as are often called "דתי לאומי". If so then, as you ask, why? Someone once told me why....


2

Kegavnah is a piece of Zohar, Parashat Terumah Page 135a, b that refers to the change in the world when Shabbat comes in, specifically when the words of Borchu of Maariv are said. It explains that the "oneness" of this world can bond with the true "oneness" of Above, making G-d's Throne "complete" (see Rashi on Exodus 17:16), allowing Him to "sit" upon it. ...


2

I once heard - do not remember from whom - that we say Hashem's name at the Korbanos that are done for a personal Kapara such as a Chatas and Asham to invoke Hashem's mercy upon us.


2

The Baal Shem Tov and his disciples would pray from prayer books called 'Siddur Ha-Ari' whose main purpose was to present the kavvanot of the Arizal on the words of prayer. These were handwritten manuscripts; later a few versions were printed (here is a page from the one used by the Besht himself). Because the kavvanot sometimes assume certain variations in ...


2

My mother's father was born in Dinov. When he was 14 years old he went to stay with his wealthy cousins in Cologne. At that point he adopted Yekishe Minhagim and kept them his entire life. My uncle and his children have maintained these Minhagim after asking his Rosh Yeshiva.


2

This says that gebrochts was a private neder. "He did not eat gebrochts but allowed his family to do so. Because of this, his meals were prepared in special keilim separate from the rest of the family’s keilim. In his old age, when it was hard for him to eat matzoh unless it was soaked in water, he was matir neder and ate gebrochts as well. (...


2

Apparently this is one of the times that nusach sfard is correct in keeping the original minhag. The Ramma 581 siff one says to blow shofar in the erev. The Mishna Berurah when tagging on the minhag to say lidovid mentions that erev is after mincha. The Chayei Adam and Aruch Hashulchan say the same. The Igros Moshe in O'ch part 4 siman 21 ois 5 explains the ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible