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19

I am a convert and have learned both opinions. My late Rav, Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer, zt'l, held in accordance with the Rema. I did not sit shiva for my father or say the kaddish for him. However, Rabbi Yitzhok Breitowitz, shlita, told me that because there are "chashuvah" poskim who hold otherwise, e.g. Rav Ovadiah Yosef, the response should be based on ...


16

It's something like that, based on my observations of my local Reform and Conservative communities. What I notice in particular with the Conservative daily minyan is that there are some regulars, some people who just come to say kaddish, and some people who initially came to say kaddish (for a month or for a year; I don't mean one day) and then stuck around. ...


13

The Mishna Brura OC 56 sk 8 implies that one cannot sit down during kaddish, but if he was sitting already then he may continue to do so. However, he says it is proper to be strict and stand up anyway. I note that the whole standing up discussion is limited to the part of kaddish until "da'amiran be'alma ve'imru amen".


11

While the Nishmas Yisrael (pg 469) believes that there is no issue, quoting the Maharshag (Teshuvah 2:40), he himself notes that, if so, one should be able to say kaddish without a quorum of ten. This seems to me to be an opinion that is very much in the minority, even though he himself seems to only think that R. Chaim Abulafia disagrees. Really though, ...


10

Per Maariv quoting Chadrei Chadarim quoting Rabbi Shteinman Shlita there is no problem answering Amein if one says Kaddish on his dog. "האם מותר לענות אחרי קדיש כזה (לכלב), אמן ואמן יהא שמיה רבא?", נשאל הגראי"ל על ידי תלמידיו, בעקבות פנייה של אדם שביקש להגיד קדיש על כלבו שנפטר - כך על פי אתר האינטרנט החרדי בחדרי חרדים. הגראי"ל חייך והשיב: "הרי ...


9

Some base the Kadish for the soul on the date of death. Others say it goes from the date of the burial (See Pnei Baruch 34:9). The amount of time a soul should have the kadish is the 12 months of geihinom. The minhag is to retract this to 11 months so that it doesn't appear as if the son is assuming his parent needed geihinom (Rema YD 276:4). I have ...


9

According to the Beit Yosef (OC 123; citing Rav Hai Gaon), the custom is based on the idea that the tefillos correspond to the tamid offerings. When the kohen would go up to the altar, he would go up on the right side, go around, and descend on the left side. We face left first, then right, because we are orienting ourselves according to the Shechina's ...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 56:11 writes (my translation): מנהג האשכנזים כדעת הרמ''א, לעמוד בשעה שעונים קדיש וברכו, וספרדי שמתפלל עם אשכנזים, נכון שיעמוד גם הוא עמהם בעת אמירת קדיש וברכו, כדי שלא יהיה בכלל יושב בין העומדים. The Ashkenazi custom, per the ReM"A, is to stand when responding to Qaddish and Barekhu. And, as for a Sepharadi ...


9

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה says that as long as there are at least 6 people actually answering, you may say Kaddish, as long as there are 10 adult males above Bar Mitzva awake in the room - even if 1, 2, 3 or 4 of them are forbidden from answering kaddish at that moment. סעיף ז': אִם אֵין ט' שׁוֹמְעִין לְהַשְּׁלִיחַ ...


9

I wholly agree with Monica's excellent answer, but I would like to point out another phenomenon. Many non-Orthodox Jews go through a portion of their adult lives without giving much thought to religious practice. A traumatic event like the death of a parent can cause them to re-evaluate their lives. They may see the end of the long chain of familial ...


9

The general rule is that letters "בגד כפת" do have a dagesh when they appear in the beginning of a word, unless the word follows a word that ends with one of the vowels (אהוי), and there's a contextual connection between the two words (for example, "אחרי כן"). So here, by saying "כרעותיה" without a dagesh, you are actually saying that the two words "ברא ...


8

R' Brody discusses the issue on JPost's Ask the Rabbi. He cites many authorities, such as R.Y.D Soloveitchik and R.Y.Henkin, that permitted it and R.M. Feinstein who said it was common practice in Europe. However, he mentions some objections raised: The permissive position was opposed by many decisors, who argued that (a) women could not participate in ...


8

The Chidah in Shu"t Chaim Sha'al 1:71:2 brings down that if one is sitting and holding a sefer Torah and a Rebbe passes by one should not get up. Also, I believe if one sits with a Torah during hakafos it is fine.


8

Rabbi Yechezkel Moskowitz answers that one may make a full "Siyum" on all "Masechtos Ketanos", except for Maseches Derech Eretz (he quotes the Sefer Yoma Tava, Sha'ar 1, Page 23). For the exception of Maseches Derech Eretz, he notes the Maharsham to OC 551:10 (image below), which states clearly in the name of the Peri Megadim (Mishbetzos Zahav) and Bach ...


8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


7

Michael Sandler, you have 2 questions: Do 10 have to hear kadish? (No) Do 10 have to say Amen to kadish? (No) (OK, maybe that progression should have been the other way around.) A "davar shebekedusha" is a matter that requires a special presence of G-d (from the pasuk of Hashem nitzav ba'adas e-l we learn that this is 10 adult men). Once Hashem's special ...


7

I know this isn't as in-depth an answer as you were hoping for, but I found something in the ArtScroll Mesorah Series book, Kaddish, which may point you in a useful search direction. (Kaddish, Mesorah Publications, LTD, Brooklyn, NY, 1980, Scherman & Zlotowitz, eds.) 1.Regarding the use of the word ואראע a comment on page 55 says the Rambam did not ...


7

Ha-Rav Ovadiah Yosef rules that it is permissible and proper to recite Kaddish (Shut Yechaveh Da’at 6:60).


7

I have no source other than my teachers(' Mesorah?), but I was taught, and I believe, that it is proper for the חזן to wait until after the completion of the קדיש. It seems to me that, rather than waiting for praise, he is preventing distraction, and his presence and staid stance at the עמוד help to maintain the decorum through the last words of the קדיש.


7

See here: Siddur Admur [omitted in Shulchan Aruch]; Shaar Hakavanos 190; Peri Eitz Chaim Shaar R”H 7; Kaf Hachaim 582/15; M”E 582/1 and 22 The reason: The Gematria of Hashalom is the same as Safriel Hamalach which is the angel which writes the Jews in the book of life during Aseres Yimei Teshuvah. [Peri Eitz Chaim ibid brought in Kaf Hachaim ...


7

Excerpt from this article: To avoid fights, many places allow all the Avelim (mourners) to say Kaddish (prayer said on behalf of the deceased) together. However, they must say it together word-for-word, for two voices saying the same thing in unison are not heard, except for something heard infrequently that is very dear to the listener. Kaddish (...


6

Accroding to Rabbi Jack Abramowitz having a child or other relative as a catalyst for the congregation to praise God is an indisputable source of merit for the deceased. He basis this on a story about Rabbi Akiva, as given in Rabbi Abramowitz's essay on ou.org


6

According to the source that you cited in the Mishna Berura and Biur Halacha, there does not seem to be any distinction made between the different responses with kaddish. All seem to be ok during Pesuka deZimra. ביאור הלכה: ...ומכל מקום, לענין קדיש...נראה לי פשוט דבפסוקי דזמרה יפסיק לכל זה, אף במקום דלא סליק ענינא [Edit: New Sources] However, the sefer ...


6

Per Rabbi Avraham Yosef Shlita if someone started saying Kaddish in error and people already answered the first Amen it should be completed until Chatzi Kaddish. Piskei Teshuvos 131:4 notes 14 & 15 says as follows. Shaalos U'Teshuvos Lehoros Noson Volume 6 Siman 7 says that when Kaddish was said in error, Tachanun should be recited immediately and then ...


6

This is discussed in Chakirey Minhagim (Rabbi Eliyahu Yochonan Gurary, vol. 2 pg. 90): Eshel Avraham (OC 219:3) debated this and although he begins by saying that it would seem to be a interruption to say Hagomel between the brochos and kadish, he concludes that where there is no existing custom it is perhaps preferable to say Hagomel first. His explanation ...


6

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:6 states: Some say that one need not stand for Kaddish. However, any Kaddish which catches you standing, like after Hallel, one should [remain] standing until after [responding] Yehei Shmei Rabba. And some say that one should always stand for Kaddish and other Davar SheBiKedusha, since we should learn a Kal ...


6

One may not interrupt the amida to recite kaddish if one is in the middle of the amida. Rather, one should pause and silently (and attentively) listen to the person who is reciting the kaddish and fulfill his obligation thereby (Shulchan Aruch OC 104:7). After the word yisbarach (after amein y'hei sh'meih rabba), one should continue with his amida and not ...


5

The Arizal was not Makpid to stand during Kaddish (Shaar Hakawanot Daf 16 Amud 4 based on the Kaf HaHaim 56:20 and the Sefaradi Aharonim all agreed to this Pesak).


5

Rabbi Shmuel Kamenetsky in his Sefer brings as the source for a Shabbos morning Drasha prior to Musaf Brachos 28b first Rashi.


5

Tefilo Kehilchoso 4 (14) says in the name of the Igros Moshe OC 3 (89) that one may not publicly conduct oneself in a way different to the custom of congregation in which he is praying. See also the accepted (green ticked) answer to this question and apply the same principle here: "Generally a good idea would be not to do anything that actively shows ...


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