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20

I am a convert and have learned both opinions. My late Rav, Rabbi Gedaliah Anemer, zt'l, held in accordance with the Rema. I did not sit shiva for my father or say the kaddish for him. However, Rabbi Yitzhok Breitowitz, shlita, told me that because there are "chashuvah" poskim who hold otherwise, e.g. Rav Ovadiah Yosef, the response should be based on ...


16

It's something like that, based on my observations of my local Reform and Conservative communities. What I notice in particular with the Conservative daily minyan is that there are some regulars, some people who just come to say kaddish, and some people who initially came to say kaddish (for a month or for a year; I don't mean one day) and then stuck around. ...


11

While the Nishmas Yisrael (pg 469) believes that there is no issue, quoting the Maharshag (Teshuvah 2:40), he himself notes that, if so, one should be able to say kaddish without a quorum of ten. This seems to me to be an opinion that is very much in the minority, even though he himself seems to only think that R. Chaim Abulafia disagrees. Really though, ...


10

Per Maariv quoting Chadrei Chadarim quoting Rabbi Shteinman Shlita there is no problem answering Amein if one says Kaddish on his dog. "האם מותר לענות אחרי קדיש כזה (לכלב), אמן ואמן יהא שמיה רבא?", נשאל הגראי"ל על ידי תלמידיו, בעקבות פנייה של אדם שביקש להגיד קדיש על כלבו שנפטר - כך על פי אתר האינטרנט החרדי בחדרי חרדים. הגראי"ל חייך והשיב: "הרי ...


9

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh - Yalqut Yosef, Siman 56:11 writes (my translation): מנהג האשכנזים כדעת הרמ''א, לעמוד בשעה שעונים קדיש וברכו, וספרדי שמתפלל עם אשכנזים, נכון שיעמוד גם הוא עמהם בעת אמירת קדיש וברכו, כדי שלא יהיה בכלל יושב בין העומדים. The Ashkenazi custom, per the ReM"A, is to stand when responding to Qaddish and Barekhu. And, as for a Sepharadi ...


9

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה says that as long as there are at least 6 people actually answering, you may say Kaddish, as long as there are 10 adult males above Bar Mitzva awake in the room - even if 1, 2, 3 or 4 of them are forbidden from answering kaddish at that moment. סעיף ז': אִם אֵין ט' שׁוֹמְעִין לְהַשְּׁלִיחַ ...


9

I wholly agree with Monica's excellent answer, but I would like to point out another phenomenon. Many non-Orthodox Jews go through a portion of their adult lives without giving much thought to religious practice. A traumatic event like the death of a parent can cause them to re-evaluate their lives. They may see the end of the long chain of familial ...


9

The general rule is that letters "בגד כפת" do have a dagesh when they appear in the beginning of a word, unless the word follows a word that ends with one of the vowels (אהוי), and there's a contextual connection between the two words (for example, "אחרי כן"). So here, by saying "כרעותיה" without a dagesh, you are actually saying that the two words "ברא ...


8

Rabbi Yechezkel Moskowitz answers that one may make a full "Siyum" on all "Masechtos Ketanos", except for Maseches Derech Eretz (he quotes the Sefer Yoma Tava, Sha'ar 1, Page 23). For the exception of Maseches Derech Eretz, he notes the Maharsham to OC 551:10 (image below), which states clearly in the name of the Peri Megadim (Mishbetzos Zahav) and Bach ...


8

The entire prayer, except for the last line, is in Aramaic. צלי, צלא, or צלו are different constructs of the word meaning "pray". צלותהון means "their prayers". As for the root, I believe it is likely correct that it is צלא, though a part of me wants to go digging in my old Aramaic text books to rule out the possibility that it is צלי. I have never heard ...


8

It can be found where you mentioned in Siddur Rav Amram Gaon. He also brings a barchu l'yachid on next page. For further info and more opinions see the Darkei Moshe Ha'Aruch 59: 3 Text:


7

Ha-Rav Ovadiah Yosef rules that it is permissible and proper to recite Kaddish (Shut Yechaveh Da’at 6:60).


7

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in 15:6 states: Some say that one need not stand for Kaddish. However, any Kaddish which catches you standing, like after Hallel, one should [remain] standing until after [responding] Yehei Shmei Rabba. And some say that one should always stand for Kaddish and other Davar SheBiKedusha, since we should learn a Kal VaChomer from ...


7

I have no source other than my teachers(' Mesorah?), but I was taught, and I believe, that it is proper for the חזן to wait until after the completion of the קדיש. It seems to me that, rather than waiting for praise, he is preventing distraction, and his presence and staid stance at the עמוד help to maintain the decorum through the last words of the קדיש.


7

See here: Siddur Admur [omitted in Shulchan Aruch]; Shaar Hakavanos 190; Peri Eitz Chaim Shaar R”H 7; Kaf Hachaim 582/15; M”E 582/1 and 22 The reason: The Gematria of Hashalom is the same as Safriel Hamalach which is the angel which writes the Jews in the book of life during Aseres Yimei Teshuvah. [Peri Eitz Chaim ibid brought in Kaf Hachaim ...


7

Excerpt from this article: To avoid fights, many places allow all the Avelim (mourners) to say Kaddish (prayer said on behalf of the deceased) together. However, they must say it together word-for-word, for two voices saying the same thing in unison are not heard, except for something heard infrequently that is very dear to the listener. Kaddish (...


6

Per Rabbi Avraham Yosef Shlita if someone started saying Kaddish in error and people already answered the first Amen it should be completed until Chatzi Kaddish. Piskei Teshuvos 131:4 notes 14 & 15 says as follows. Shaalos U'Teshuvos Lehoros Noson Volume 6 Siman 7 says that when Kaddish was said in error, Tachanun should be recited immediately and then ...


6

This is discussed in Chakirey Minhagim (Rabbi Eliyahu Yochonan Gurary, vol. 2 pg. 90): Eshel Avraham (OC 219:3) debated this and although he begins by saying that it would seem to be a interruption to say Hagomel between the brochos and kadish, he concludes that where there is no existing custom it is perhaps preferable to say Hagomel first. His explanation ...


6

One may not interrupt the amida to recite kaddish if one is in the middle of the amida. Rather, one should pause and silently (and attentively) listen to the person who is reciting the kaddish and fulfill his obligation thereby (Shulchan Aruch OC 104:7). After the word yisbarach (after amein y'hei sh'meih rabba), one should continue with his amida and not ...


5

Rabbi Shmuel Kamenetsky in his Sefer brings as the source for a Shabbos morning Drasha prior to Musaf Brachos 28b first Rashi.


5

Originally, there were 7 kaddishes for tefila, 3 during the morning service: Following pesukei d'zimra Following shemona esre Following uva letzion 2 during the afternoon service: Following ashrei Following tachanun 2 during the evening service: Preceding shemona esre Following shemona esre This was based on the verse "I praised you 7 times a day" (...


5

The Arizal was not Makpid to stand during Kaddish (Shaar Hakawanot Daf 16 Amud 4 based on the Kaf HaHaim 56:20 and the Sefaradi Aharonim all agreed to this Pesak).


5

The root of the word is צלי, which means "to turn" or "incline", and which has the sense of "pray" in many passages. For the former, see the Targum on Psalm 102:12 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root נטה), and for the latter see Targum Onkelos on Genesis 12:8 (where it corresponds to the Hebrew word of root קרא). When it means "pray", it is ...


5

"Wait until the Aron is closed" - I suspect it's for practical reasons; at some points in the services, people will sit down (e.g. Tachanun) at the next prayer, and they ideally should remain standing while the Aron is open, so we wait. Another practicality is you can offend the poor confused fellow who's been honored with closing the Aron by starting the ...


5

Based on Rav Eliezer Melamed (Peninei Halacha Tefillah 23:2 fn3) where one said Kaddish Shalem after Tachanun, he quotes Ishei Yisrael 26:5 who says to skip the "Tiskabel line" when Kaddish Shalem would have been said. This should equally apply to our case as well.


5

The proper way to do it would be to sa kaddish according to the nussach of the shul. The reason for that being, that "al titosh metoras imecha" does not apply when davining in such a shul (at least for the things you need a minjan for, for everything else one is allowed to follow ones own nussach). There is also a Gemore in Pesachim 52 "al yeschaneh adam ...


5

The Nusach is from the Rambam סדר תפילות כל השנה - נסח הקדיש where he says: עשֶֹׁה שָׁלוֹם בִּמְרוֹמָיו הוּא בְרַחֲמָיו יַעֲשֶׂה שָׁלוֹם עָלֵינוּ וְעַל כָּל יִשְׂרָאֵל אָמֵן.‏ The Behr Siddur, pg. 131 (Siddur Avodath Yiroel, without footnotes from Yitzchok ben Aryeh Yosef Dov, printed by Rodelheim, 1868) it says: "It's from the Rambam and in all ...


5

As far as the main question is concerned, the Ramban in his debate with Pablo Christiani states (in the beginning of the section entitled "על האגדות") that the corpus of the Torah can be divided into three sections: The Bible, in which we all have complete faith The explanation of the mitzvos in the Talmud, which we also fully accept The midrashim, or ...


5

The targum Yerushalmi reads, "not with my sword nor with my bow, but through my righteousness and my good works. " and this all might be explained by the Gemara in Bava Batra 123a: The baraita cites additional related verses: And with regard to Jacob’s bequest to Joseph, the verse states: “Moreover I have given to you one portion above your brothers, ...


4

The Shulchan Aruch rules (YD 393:1) that someone who is sitting Shiv'ah (who is generally not allowed to leave his house even for mitzva purposes) is allowed to attend the burial of someone else (even unrelated) in the community from the third day of Shiv'ah and onward, and if the deceased doesn't have enough people to act as pallbearers and gravediggers ...


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