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Obviously, this is just a joke. A bar mitzvah can't be revoked. Bar Mitzvah, Bat Mitzvah and Confirmation A Jewish boy automatically becomes a bar mitzvah upon reaching the age of 13 years, and a girl upon reaching the age of 12 years. No ceremony is needed to confer these rights and obligations. The popular bar mitzvah ceremony is not required, ...


14

As with all questions of practical halachah, CYLOR (especially since there may be public policy issues involved). However: Responsa Hillel Omer (Yoreh De'ah 144) addresses such a case. He says that the boy is certainly allowed to have an aliyah, considering that it's not his fault that he is uncircumcised; at that age the responsibility still rests on his ...


13

The front is the seal of the State of Israel. The Hebrew on the back is a verse from Ruth (Ruth 3:10) which means "You are blessed to G-d, my daughter" which were words that Boaz said to Ruth when she asked him to marry her. It doesn't have an official name; it is a thoughtful trinket.


8

The rationale behind it is that Tehillim describes a lifetime as seventy years in the verse ימי שנותינו בהם שבעים שנה ואם בגבורות שמונים שנה (90:10.) Thus -- the reasoning goes -- 83 is 13 years into your "second lifetime" which is as good an excuse for a kiddush as any. I do not know of any source for it prior to the twentieth century or of any book ...


8

As stated above, the Bar Mitzvah, itself, is automatic, and it doesn't need any rabbinical intervention whatsoever. However, I see that you said specifically, Bar Mitvah "honor". Depending on what that honor was, under certain circumstances, it can, of course, be revoked. For example, if the rabbi said praises about Mr. Kushner, during his Bar Mitzvah, he ...


7

This ceremony is an American phenomena, it was invented by caterers and is the only of many creative ceremonies to have "stuck" from the early days of American Bar Mitzvah celebrations in ceremonial halls. You will find it across the spectrum of Jewish groups (including some Orthodox) but will generally only find it in ceremonial halls and not in synagogues ...


7

A star of David necklace is not a ritual object (just pretty jewelry), and I've never seen anybody take offense at one being given by a non-Jew. This is, in fact, one of the safest Jewish items you can buy; were you to try to select books or ritual objects, you would quickly run into matters of differences in tradition and would risk getting the "wrong" ...


7

The earliest source for having a large Challah at a wedding is the Maasas Binyomin (d. 1620) There is a wide spread custom to distribute slices of the large challa to the friends of the Chosson and Kallah. Some say (Nittei Gavriel quotes Darkei Chaim p27, who heard this from R' Akiva Eiger) that this is based on the famous question posed at every marriage: '...


6

Rabbi Daniel Neustat quotes the Yad Efrayim 551:31 and Divrei Yatziv 2:238 as permitting meat for a Seudas Bar Mitzvah on the day of the Bar Mitvzah. However, for this and all Seudas Mitzvah dispensations, if it is during the week that Tisha B'av falls out, only a minyan plus close relatives may partake of the meat and wine (Mishnah Berurah 551:77). Sha'ar ...


6

Thanks to Double AA I found the source in Piskei T'shuvos footnote 12 which refers to the Chasam Sofer on the Torah in Parshas Vayechi, Divrei Hamaschil "VaYar Yosef".


6

R' Gil Student cites the Ibn Ezra “[T]he beginning of each individual’s year is from the moment he was born, and when the sun returns to the same point at which it was earlier, the person completes one full year” (['Iggeret HaShabbat, chapter 1]p. 21). Nevertheless, insofar as there are halachic implications, R' Student understood the Bar Mitzvah to ...


6

The Tur writes in his introduction to Hilchos Shabbos that "all thirty nine Melachos and their Toldos are known, and there is no need [to write about them] at length...." It also says in the introduction to Siman 80 in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch that "most of the prohibitions of Shabbos are known to most Jews, so only prohibitions that are common and unknown ...


6

See the Magen Avraham, Orach Chaim 225:4. He points out a couple things: It is a Mitzvah for the father to make a Seudah (festive meal) on the day his son turns 13 (enters his 14th year, i.e. not the evening he turns 13, but the next day). This is equal to the obligation to make a Wedding Seudah. If the son makes a Drashah (Torah speech/lecture) in honor ...


6

See the book Halichot Shelomo on Tefilla chapter 23 paragraph 40 where it quotes this story.


6

Nit'ei Gavriel (Pesach, vol. 3, 50:11) cites authorities on both sides of the issue: The bar mitzvah boy and his father are indeed allowed to take haircuts (Mekor Chaim); They are not (Rivevos Ephraim); The boy can have his hair cut before his actual bar mitzvah date, when he's still a minor and not fully obligated (Divrei Shalom); If his hair is really ...


6

Yes, you are considered an adult. (Sources in this answer come from "Bar Mitzvah: Maturity of Body or Mind," by R' Yehoshua Pfeffer. I recommend reading the whole essay for a nice overview of how we determine adulthood.) "You travel" implies that there is a persistent entity called "you" that is transplanted from one time to another. If you are persistent, ...


6

Rivivos Efraim 8 page 400 says that one should say Tachanun at a Bar Mitzva and also has a letter from Rabbi Nosson Gestetner which says that Tachanun should be said at a Bar Mitzva as it is not listed in Orach Chaim 131:4-6 as one of the times it should not be said. See also Minchas Yitzchak 8:11 where he mentions that the Minchas Elazar did not say ...


6

Generally, Orthodox families do not make a huge fuss with Bnot Mitzvah ("B'not being the plural of "Bat") - at least not on the same level as a Bar Mitzvah. That means, that there is usually no festivity done in a synagogue. (Within the past decade or so, that has been changing very slightly, as some Modern Orthodox have started doing at least some small ...


6

A similar question is when Rosh Chodesh is on Sunday, do we say "ya'aleh v'ya'vo" in bentching of Shalosh Seudos? There the answer (see Mishna Berura Siman 188 Sif Katan 33) is that it's a sofek (a doubt) and so we don't, unless you would eat at least a kazis of bread after tzeis when it's definitely night and then you would definitely say "ya'aleh v'ya'vo." ...


6

A Bar Mitzvah ceremony or celebration is a just a custom - a nice way of signifying the occasion of one's becoming obligated in the commandments, but it is not a prerequisite and does not actually have any significance halachically; the obligation to perform the commandments comes regardless of any ceremony. So feel free to begin all the practices you ...


5

The Yalkut Yosef says that it depends on the reason for saying the blessing: We say it because the boy will no longer be punished for the father's sins (and [underage] girls are punished the same way [underage] boys are). We say it because the father will no longer be punished for the boys sins (as he is no longer responsible to educate him). (And one is ...


5

Rav Ovadya Yosef, in Yabia Omer 6 OC 29, writes that one should say the blessing (ברוך שפטרני מעונשה של זו) at the Bat Mitzva celebration without God's name, just as one should recite it without God's name at a boy's Bar Mitzva celebration.


5

You mean whether to not attend a friend's bar mitzva? If the friend's bar mitzva is at 10AM on a Sunday morning, and you really love your weekly baseball game at that time, so you go to earlybird prayers at 7AM that morning, then go to your baseball game -- well it's between you and your friend (or your family, or their family), would your presence at the ...


5

As always, please consult your rabbi for a practical ruling. There are several issues here. Does "Leining" count as "singing?" Is the fact that she's reciting Tanach make a difference? Is there an issue of Kavod haTzibbur? Are there any other mitigating factors? 1) The Rama (O.C. 75:3) and Bait Shmuel (21:4) state that this prohibition applies only to ...


5

The reason for the custom is that according to those who understand these matters, Monday and Thursday are Yemei Rotzon, days of added Divine "favor", and Shabbos afternoon is also known in Kabbala as a time of Raava d'Raavin, a time of extreme Divine favor. So it is seen as especially auspicious to have one's first aliya during that more Jewishly "...


5

R' Ovadia Yosef in Yabia Omer 1:27 says that a Bar Mitzvah boy entering mitzva-hood is like a chosson entering the chuppah and therefore one does not say tachanun on a bar-mitzvah.


5

R. Moshe Feinstein wrote the following in a responsum: Igrot Moshe O.C. 1:104 ואי איישר חילי הייתי מבטל במדינתנו גם סדר הבר מצוה של הבנים שכידוע לא הביא זה שום איש לקרבו לתורה ולמצות ואף לא את הבר מצוה אף לא לשעה אחת ואדרבה בהרבה מקומות מביא זה לחלול שבת ועוד איסורים And if I had the strength I would cancel in our country even the Bar Mitzvah ...


4

Consult the shul's rabbi for practical advice. The rabbi in my synagogue is very particular that the reading of the Torah is done precisely, because we must ensure that the mesorah gets passed down perfectly. The implicaion may be that mistakes in other parts of the service (like returning the scroll to the ark) need not be corrected if this would embarrass ...


4

If by "skipping a bar mitzvah" you mean "skip going to the service where the person in question celebrates becoming bar mitzvah, then it's basically no worse than skipping any other service. If it's Saturday morning you skipped a Shabbat service; a man (13+) who does this misses his obligation to pray in a community, but (as I understand it) a woman doesn't ...


4

The Gemora (Sukka 5b) says that all measurements are halocha lemoshe misinai; received orally by Moshe Rabeinu on Har Sinai. Many Rishonim say that the age of 13 as Bar Mitzvah is included in this (Sheilos V'Teshuvos HaRosh Klal 16 Siman 1, Sheilos V'Teshuvos Maharil Siman 51, Rashi to Avos 5:21). However there are hints from the Torah. The most famous is ...


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