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15

OK. The reason is that according to halacha a hymen will regrow if ruptured before the age of three.1 For this reason, it is considered as if no sexual act has occurred as far as the girl's halachic status is concerned, to the extent that her status as a virgin has not changed. Hence, she (for example) is entitled to a minimum kesuba of 200 zuz, just as ...


14

Teach the difference from the very beginning. Even if they don't really understand the difference between saying that a story is written in the Torah, or is from a Midrash/Gemara/Rashi but doesn't appear in the Torah, you wont damage them by inserting a little comment right before/after a story giving its source. Kids are smart - they will hear what you ...


14

The Taz in YD 289 sk 3 is medayek (derives from a careful reading) that both the Rama and the Mechaber rule like the Rambam that if the mezuzah is placed below the upper third it is invalid even bediavad (after the fact). No one seems to mention any distinction based on the height of the room's occupants be they children or adults and it doesn't seem there ...


12

You seem to be asking two questions here: Is Lego© Mutar for an adult to use? How about a child? If it's only Mutar for a child, does that render it muktze for an adult? (Perhaps I'm reading into your question because of the availability of my answer, but either way it will address your question.) Hacham Ovadia Yosef, in Yechave Da'at (2:55), Addresses ...


12

" my 4-year-old has offhandedly pointed out that "God's not real," or "not a real person."" In response to this exact line of conversation I would suggest the following. Admit to the child that based on how they understand "real", or how you have taught "real" to them in the past, they are correct. Explain to the child that some things are real even if ...


12

As CharlesKoppelman said in the comments above, it is the custom of some Jewish people to prefer surrounding their children with only pure, kosher images, including those of animals. This is, as he said, not universal, nor even extremely common, AFAIK. I suggest you just ask the parents beforehand. They'll be glad to tell you :D Sources for the scholarly:...


12

TL;DR It is a misquote. It is talking about the age at which the girl converted, not the age at the time of the marriage. Regarding these sorts of misquotes in general, see this related question. Regarding the significance of the age of three, it refers to a legal technicality as explained in the final bullet point of this answer. Molesting a child, whether ...


11

No. From one parent who actually observed a bat mitzva by having her daughter tear for the first time: Mishnah Berurah, Orach Chaim 561:17. In fact, children might be forbidden to tear their clothes because of ba’al tashchit, the prohibition against wanton waste! See, for a related analysis, Minchat Chinuch 264:34* (Machon Yerushalayim edition, [Netanya,...


11

There seem to be different views. On the one hand Chabad are solidly in favour, see here. A reason is suggested why the custom is not prevalent. On the other, Rabbi Eli Mansour at dailyhalacha.com says “…Therefore, the prevalent practice is that the unmarried daughters living in the home do not light Shabbat candles, and instead rely on the mother’s ...


10

Even if there's a decoration that completely covers the schach, if it's placed there merely for decoration, than it isn't a problem, provided that the decorations are within 4 tefachim of the schach (Gemara Sukka 10a, Shulchan Aruch O.C. 627:4) However, this is assuming that they have been placed there for the purpose of decorations, otherwise, even a small ...


10

There is a famous story about Rabbi Yaakov Kaminetzky, told in the book, Reb Yaakov, by Yonason Rosenblum, pp.326-327. Reb Yaakov was particularly attuned to the dangers of exposing children to any kind of falsehood. He once visited the kindergarten of his son Binyamin's yeshiva and noticed that the mezuzah had been placed lower on the doorpost than ...


9

According to the Rambam (Hilchot Tefilla chap. 9), only the following sections of davening (prayer services) require a Chazzan [over Bar Mitzvah]: Kaddish Birchot Kriat Shema Shemona Esrei, Chazart haShatz, and Kedusha Tachanun, Ashrei and Uva L'Tzion In addition, if a part of davening doesn't require a minyan, it would make sense that a minor could lead ...


9

There is a custom in Ashkenazic communities to have a married couple act as kvatter for newborn sons during the bris. It is their role to carry the boy from the mother to the father before the circumcision takes place. While the term may be a corruption of the German "godfather", I am not aware of any specific responsibility conferred after their role is ...


9

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 345:3) writes: קטן המאבד עצמו לדעת, חשוב כשלא לדעת A minor who knowledgeably destroys himself is considered as if it was not done knowledgeably so it seems we would treat it like any other regular case of death.


9

There are two relevant segments of the idea of chillul Hashem. One discussion is the discussion of when it necessitates giving up your life. That has one set of standards, laid out in Hilchos Yesodei HaTorah 5:1-4. The other is the chillul Hashem of degrading the impression of Hashem and His followers. This is discussed in Yesodei HaTorah 5:10-11. ...


8

From Shut Igrot Moshe, Yoreh Deah, Part 2, Siman 10: ... My opinion is that the Katan (Minor?) that caused damage will have to pay when he grows up. Then he says that not everybody agrees to this (and think that he doesn't have to pay even when he grows up) but he couldn't find their opinion in Shulchan Aruch. So the discussion is about the Katan's payment ...


8

Firstly, we circumcise because it the sign specifically commanded in the Torah, by God to the Abraham and his descendants for entering the eternal covenant with God (Bereshit, 17). In return, God made Abraham the father of a multitude of nations. Made him exceedingly fruitful, into nations, and kings. God gave his decedents the entire land of Canaan for an ...


8

One of my Rebeyim told me that you want to look at the 8th grade class and see how they are behaving as this is going to be the finished product of the school.


8

According to R. Benyamin Shlomo Hamberger of Shorshei Minhag Ashkenaz, the Upsherin comes from foreign (perhaps Arab) sources which somehow were emulated by the Jews. Professor Daniel Sperber (Minhagei Yisrael 8: 13-30) also suggests foreign origins along these lines. http://seforim.traditiononline.org/index.cfm/2008/5/22/Lag-BaOmer-and-Upsherins-in-Recent-...


8

Sounds like you're looking for the Gemara on Shabbos 104a. The Rabbis told R. Joshua b. Levi: Children have come to the Beth Hamidrash and said things the like of which was not said even in the days of Joshua the son of Nun. [Thus:] alef Beth [means] ‘learn wisdom [alef Binah];Gimmel Daleth, show kindness to the Poor [Gemol Dallim]. Why is the ...


8

Rabbi B'tzal'el Stern (B'tzel Hachochma volume 4 number 100) was asked whether a minor's siyum exempts an adult from taanis b'choros. He cites the Rambam (Hilchos Korban Pesach 5:7) as saying that someone who became an adult between Pesach and Pesach sheni need not offer the korban pesach sheni. The explanation of this Rambam is that, because the Torah says ...


7

There are a lot of possible allusions listed in other answers. However, one thing not mentioned is that the practice has a German name, upsheren, and furthermore that: The Pennsylvania German superstition prescribes a wait of a year before the first haircut, lest the infant lose its hair, be a weakling, or die young: EM Fogel, op. cit. (see note 24), 42, ...


7

The Rivevos Ephraim Chelek 8:564:1 was asked if one can blow bubbles from chewing gum(bazuka). He writes that making bubbles from soap was discussed in Shmiras Shabbas Kehilchasa perek 17:30 and says that one shouldn't make them. However, he writes that one shouldn't refrain a child from doing so,and the reason written in the name of Rav Shlomo Zalamn ...


7

I can't remember where I read this, but it was from a Chabad teacher. It was asked if the Mezuzah could be made lower. And his answer was that rather than lowering the Miztvah to meet the child, get a step stool so the child can climb up to reach the mezuzah. He compared this to the Cohen in the Temple who had to go up some steps in order to reach the ...


7

My preferred method - tried when teaching both my sons their Bar Mitzva Parsha - is as follows. When the child makes an error, make them go back 2 - 3 words and restart correctly from there. This will help them correct the flow; otherwise they get used to saying the wrong thing - correcting it (or hearing you correct it) - and continuing. We learn this ...


7

Nitei Gavriel Taspores 2:1:2 says the source of those who do it at 2 is based on Braishis 21:8 "Vayigdal Hayeled" and Rashi says that was at 24 months. Also Shmuel-1 1:22.


7

The prophet Jeremiah (19:5) clearly identifies the baal as one of the gods to which the Caananites offered their children: וּבָנוּ אֶת בָּמוֹת הַבַּעַל לִשְׂרֹף אֶת בְּנֵיהֶם בָּאֵשׁ עֹלוֹת לַבָּעַל אֲשֶׁר לֹא צִוִּיתִי וְלֹא דִבַּרְתִּי וְלֹא עָלְתָה עַל לִבִּי


7

R Israel Isserlein was asked this question. Here is his response (Terumat HaDeshen #125): קטן בערב פסח, שרי להאכילו מצות או לאו?‏ תשובה: ייראה, דאם לא הגיע הקטן לכלל דעת כל כך שיודע ומבין מה שמספרים לו מניסים ונפלאות ביציאת מצרים, שרי להאכילו. ואף על פי דאסרו חכמים לגדול אכילת מצה בערב פסח מזמן איסור חמץ ואילך, וקיימא לן דלא ספינן בידיים איסור ...


6

Fortunately with my oldest child this has not been an issue, she innately believes in Hashem, and I have learned a lot from her! (A day after we learned we were expecting another child she told her teacher "mommy has a baby in her belly". There is no way she could have know this. The teacher checked it out with me as 3 year olds often tell stories and when ...


6

The Tur writes in his introduction to Hilchos Shabbos that "all thirty nine Melachos and their Toldos are known, and there is no need [to write about them] at length...." It also says in the introduction to Siman 80 in Kitzur Shulchan Aruch that "most of the prohibitions of Shabbos are known to most Jews, so only prohibitions that are common and unknown ...


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