23

That's a very interesting suggestion, and I'm surprised I've never put two and two together here. After some searching, I've found that a similar suggestion was made by Shlomo Yehuda Rapoport (Shir) in the journal Kerem Chemed (vol. 7, p. 183). He suggests that the Romans chased and killed the students of R' Akiva on the suspicion that they were involved in ...


18

You sure you want to open up this can of worms? :-) Here's the situation. There is no explicit mention of any such concept in the Torah, Talmud, or adressed by the Rambam, the Rosh, the Tur, or the Shulchan Aruch. The first time this really became an issue when during WWII when yeshiva students (notably those from Mir and Chachmei Lublin) relocated from ...


15

From Nefesh HaRav by Rabbi Herschel Schachter, shlita,: "The Rishonim [end of Tractate Pesachim] ask the following: 'Why don't we count Sefirat HaOmer each night twice [i.e., "today is the second day," and "today is the first day," etc.] due to the doubtful day?' "HaRav Joseph B. Soloveitchik, zt"l, heard a reason why we do not do so ...


14

I asked Rabbi Dovid Rosenbaum, shlita, how every one of Rabbi Akiva's 24,000 students could not have treated each other with proper respect when Rabbi Akiva had taught that the most important pasuk in the Torah was "V'Ahavta l'Reacha Kamocha . . ." ("you shall love your fellow as yourself")? He answered with another question: "The better question is when ...


13

Otzar Ta'amei Haminhagim (cf.) explains that it is a remnant of a time when the spoken language was Aramaic. Since the primary purpose of s'fira is the keeping track of days it is preferable to count in a language that enables the counter to keep track - i.e. a language the counter understands.


11

In the Hagada Shel Pesach Gevuras Akiva he explains that the Rama is the one who holds that you should say Baomer, and Lag Baomer is the Yarzeit of the Rama. therefore in honor of the Rama everyone calls the day Lag Baomer.


11

Taken from this blog post (emphasis mine) R. Eliezer Dunner, in his work Zichron Yosef Tzvi, offers a very novel reason for the celebration on Lag Ba-Omer. He says that we know that R. Akiva was a strong supporter of Bar Kochba. He suggests that R. Akiva students were soldiers in his army to fight the Romans and they died in this time period of Sefirah. ...


10

The Lubavitcher Rebbe zt"l writes that there were halachic and kabbalistic reasons to switch from בעומר to לעומר in the counting (as discussed in the commentaries to Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 489:1). However, there was no real need to be so particular about dates and the like, so the older form was retained there. (This is similar to what Curiouser wrote ...


10

Hebrewbooks.org has a book with that title by R Shlomo Zalman Mirkash containing the ruling you reference about women and counting the Omer (available here).


9

Nusach Ari (as arranged by R' Shneur Zalman of Liadi) counts it before Aleinu. Shaar Hakollel (49:7) explains that this way, the kaddish recited after Aleinu also covers the chapter of Tehillim (Psalm 67) and the verses from the Torah (Lev. 23:15-16) recited after the sefirah. Mishnah Berurah (489:2) gives another reason: this way it's done as early as ...


9

The Torah commands us to count the Omer "מהחל חרמש בקמה" (Devarim 16:9), ("When the sickle 'begins' with the stalks"). Thus, it is assumed that the Omer should be counted when the stalks for the Korban Omer should be cropped. The mitzva of קצירת העומר (cropping of the omer) applies at night (Menachos 71a), and it is disputed amongst the Rishonim whether it ...


9

The Mishna Berura (489 sk 22) posits that if you don't say the number of weeks (on a night where there are weeks to count) in response to a friend then you may continue to count with a bracha later that night. This is a combination of a number of considerations. First, there is a machloket if the weeks count is an absolute requirement (l'ikuva) on every day,...


9

The Levush (489, end of 1) writes: 1) It's part of Yom Tov so it's included in the Shehecheyanu of Yom Tov, 2) Since Sefira was in anticipation for Matan Torah which is the main Simcha, it doesn't make sense to say Shehecheyanu on something we are anticipating for before that day arrives! The Ba'er Heitev (5) brings that the reason is that Shehecheyonu is ...


9

Chassidic thought explains that because every person is unique in his nature and thought processes, he has a unique path in the service of G-d. Similarly, each of Rabbi Akiva’s disciples had his own approach. Because they were highly developed individuals, each had internalized his particular approach to the point that it dominated his personality. ...


9

The Beit Yosef there quotes many Rishonim who have a version of the story (Yevamot 62b) that Rabbi Akiva's students died until פרוס העצרת a half [month] before Shavuot. So 49-15=34 and on the last day we say that a partial day counts as the whole day so on the 34th in the morning, the mourning ends.


9

That is why we say "yesterday was the fourth day" before counting. You do not want to say "today is" in any way because even in an indirect manner you are counting today. Once you have said "today is" then however you say the number, that is still a count. "Code of Jewish Law Ganzfried - Goldin, volume 3 page 52 chapter 120 number 3 (translation of Kitzur ...


9

For a start, the words before the ones you mention are: שֶׁבַע שַׁבָּתוֹת, תְּמִימֹת תִּהְיֶינָה Seven complete weeks are only 49 days. Secondly, we see other times in Chumash that a number means "until, but not including" that number. For example in Devarim (25:3): אַרְבָּעִים יַכֶּנּוּ, לֹא יֹסִיף We only strike him 39 lashes; all the up to - but ...


9

There's no such thing as "counting with a bracha" and "counting without a bracha". The Mitzva is to count. Blessings on (just about) all Mitzvot are separate rabbinic obligations. Whether or not a blessing is said on a Mitzva is a separate question from if there is a Mitzva (some Mitzvot never have blessings!). A Mitzva done without its requisite blessing (...


8

Shaalos U'Teshuvos Rabbi Akiva Eiger 29 says that someone who wrote the number of the day of Sefira he must count still with a Bracha והדבר ברור שצריך לחזור ולספור בברכה. Birchei Yosef 489:14 discusses someone who wrote a letter and in the letter wrote the number of the day in Sefira - that he has to count with a Bracha לאו כמספר בפיו ולא עלתה לו. ...


8

From Halachaicly Speaking : One is permitted to dance after kiddush levana even during sefira (Piskei Shmuos quoting the opinion of Harav D’bilitsky Shlita)


8

The correct order to perform the Mitzvos would be: 1 - Krias Shema(which is most frequent) 2 - Birchas Hamazon 3 - Sefiras Haomer Many people are accustomed to recite Krias Shema after Birchas Hamazon, even though Krias Shema is the more frequent Mitzvah. The reason why many permit this is that one is not obligated to interrupt his ...


7

Per Az Nidbru 10:23:2 as well as Yechave Daas 1:45 it is permissible to listen to music on Chol Hamoed Pesach.


7

We count up because the Pasuk (Vayikra 23:15) says to count "from the day of the Omer-offering" not "to the day of Shavuot".


7

The Beit Yosef (OC 493) quotes Rabbeinu Yerocham (~1350 CE) who quotes "Geonim" who mention a custom not to get married between Pesach and Shavuot.


7

This is the ruling of Rabbi Yosef Karo in Shulchan Aruch OC 489:8 and Rabbi Moshe Isserles does not comment. Additionally, Aruch haShulchan (:15) and Shulchan Aruch haRav (:25) cite this ruling approvingly and Mishna Berura (:38) does not note any dissenters.


6

To tie up everything that's been said (and more): Nusach Ashkenaz generally say BaOmer at the end Nusach Sefard generally say LaOmer at the end Nusach of Sefardim (i.e. Edut Mizrach) say LaOmer before the weeks Nusach of Teiman say the count like the Nusach of Sefardim, except they say it in Aramaic [and say baomer(?)] I have seen (and not confirmed) that ...


6

Nit'ei Gavriel brings a disagreement between poskim in this matter. He writes, therefore, that one should be stringent, but in a pressing situation (מקום צורך), one may be lenient.


6

Nit'ei Gavriel (Pesach, vol. 3, 50:11) cites authorities on both sides of the issue: The bar mitzvah boy and his father are indeed allowed to take haircuts (Mekor Chaim); They are not (Rivevos Ephraim); The boy can have his hair cut before his actual bar mitzvah date, when he's still a minor and not fully obligated (Divrei Shalom); If his hair is really ...


6

From Halachically Speaking, Volume 3 Issue 16: Some poskim say one who has not yet counted the sefira of Lag B’omer should avoid telling someone else today is Lag B’omer, since doing so may be considered counting the day.78 Other poskim permit this since his intention is not to count the day, rather he is referring to the name of the day since it is a ...


6

While saying this paragraph [Ana Bechoach], one should look at - or envisage - the Sheimos (Divine Names) formed by the acronyms of its words, but one should not pronounce them. http://www.sichosinenglish.org/books/sefer-haminhagim/28.htm#t206


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