9

If eating is actually repulsive, at that point it is not considered halkhicaly eating and he will not fulfil his obligation of eating the third meal. See Mishna Berurah siman 291 #4. As far as making a bracha on just such a non-eating, see Mishna Berurah siman 204 #48 concerning a food which one finds repulsive but is eating for health reasons, being that ...


8

I'll ask it even stronger: What if someone is feeding you and you have no intention of using your hands to interact with the food at all? Well, the Shulchan Aruch rules in OC 163:2 that in such a case, only the one eating must wash his hands and not the one feeding. He doesn't mention that one would not say a bracha and the implication is that it's the same ...


8

See the Otzer Dinim U'Minhagim quoted in this answer, discussing Shir HaShirim. Quoting Minhagei Yeshurun, one of the answers is that Friday night is the time of intimacy between a man and wife.


7

The Talmud (Megillah 7b) very clearly rules that one who ate his Purim meal at night has not fulfilled his obligation to have a meal on Purim. The Mordechai (Moed, Remez 787) quotes the Raavyah who (as understood by the Bach OC 695) rules that the night of Purim should have a seudah, and the Gemara is only saying that the obligation for the main meal must ...


7

No. The Kaf HaHaim 181:10 rules that one isn't required to use a Keli that is proper for Netilat Yadayim (see Levush and Kol Bo Siman 23).


7

Shulchan Arukh OC 291:1 יהא זהיר מאד לקיים סעודה שלישית ואף אם הוא שבע יכול לקיים אותה בכביצה ואם אי אפשר לו כלל לאכול אינו חייב לצער את עצמו והחכם עיניו בראשו שלא ימלא בטנו בסעודת הבוקר כדי ליתן מקום לסעודה שלישית:‏ One should be careful to fulfill The Third Meal, and even if he is satiated he can fulfill it with an egg's bulk. And if he is unable ...


7

R. Pinchas Zavichi quotes a source for this custom. He begins by quoting R. Yissachar Dov Rokeach who proved that the post-Shabbat meal must have been dairy in the times of Israel's wanderings in the wilderness, because based on various legal rules there would have been no meat available for consumption on Saturday night. R. Zavichi then goes on to quote ...


6

The rules of eating a meal in the same place one made or heard kidush are written among the rules of Friday night's kidush (and applied to both). Thus, the rule (Mishna B'rura 273:25) that cake suffices for this (so one need not immediately eat bread) applies to the nighttime as well as the daytime kidush. (However, even if he is famished during the day and ...


6

Often times in the winter when it is a short Shabbos afternoon it is difficult to eat Shalosh Seudos as people are still quiet full from the morning meal. However the Friday night meal and Shabbos morning meal people are hungry and have a appetite for them. Therefore when they eat Shalosh Seudos which is only being eaten in honor of Shabbos that shows that ...


6

After introducing the basic reasons for Chanukah, the Kitzur Shulchan Aruch writes: ולכן י"א שמצוה להרבות קצת בסעודה בחנוכה, ועוד מפני שמלאכת המשכן נגמר בימים אלו, ויש לספר לב"ב ענין הניסים שנעשו לאבותנו בימים האלו, ומ"מ לא הוי סעודת מצוה אא"כ אומרים בסעודה שירות ותשבחות Therefore, some say that there is a mitzva to increase somewhat in feasting, and ...


6

See the Magen Avraham, Orach Chaim 225:4. He points out a couple things: It is a Mitzvah for the father to make a Seudah (festive meal) on the day his son turns 13 (enters his 14th year, i.e. not the evening he turns 13, but the next day). This is equal to the obligation to make a Wedding Seudah. If the son makes a Drashah (Torah speech/lecture) in honor ...


6

Nitei Gavriel Aveilus2 23:20 says that the father of the baby can participate in a Bris and Seuda for his son even during the Sheloshim. אבי הבן, כשהוא אבל עושה משתה ושמחה ביום המילה ומשתתף אף בתוך שלשים In the notes he mentions the Shach Yoreh Deah 394:2 quoting the Derisha in the name of the Rokeach that one should not make a Simcha and party on the ...


6

By talking about something really interesting that applies to your crowd. Know your audience is rule #1. NOTE Some people will tune out easily when hearing a regular scholarly vort on the Parshah or Halachah. You should not use such ideas on that crowd. You should instead focus on heartwarming stories and aggadata. By opening up with a statement that is ...


6

The Beur Halacha says that beshaas hadechak, in pressing circumstances, when you make kiddush you can have in mind to eat in another room in the same building. He concludes that if you can see the other room, then in all circumstances it's fine, so long as you had in mind to eat there. My guess has always been that in certain shuls the Rabbi is concerned ...


5

Orach Chaim 188:10 says that one who starts a Seuda before the end of Chanuka and completes it after Chanuka would say Al HaNisim.


5

As already discussed here , Halacha disallows inviting non Jews on Yom Tov (Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 512:1). However, it is allowed on Shabbat, (Tur Orach Chaim 325). However, there are technical issues that need to be taken into account when inviting non-Jews to a Shabbat tables. Here are some issues: Wine: If it's not cooked (Mevushal) then you have ...


5

As far as I know the rule is: "If you eat kezais in kodesh you add special bench" Therefore, in all those cases you have to add Rtzei/Yaale Veyavo. After searching for sources Here is a booklet of R. Yosef Zvi Rimon. The paragraph that starts with the words "יעלה ויבוא בסעודת ר"ח שנמשכה לערב" gives lot of useful references on the topic. (I can't say for ...


5

The Rama (YD 391:2) quotes opinions both ways if a mourner may partake of the meal at a circumcision (the doubt is if it is considered "celebratory" like a wedding is), and notes the custom is to permit a mourner to eat at such a meal only if held in his house. So according to that they could just host the circumcision [meal] at home.


5

When everyone has to stop what they are doing in the meal and briefly be quiet for a dvar torah, it gives the impression that torah is apart from normal living. How do you avoid the presentation of the dvar torah as something separate to real life?… In a slightly different vein, how do you approach attempting to interweave divrei torah into normal ...


5

Here's an approach that I've found to be generally successful, when I've deployed it at my own table. Topic of interest As both previous answers indicated, and as multiple answers to this related question did too, pick a topic that you are personally interested in discussing. Your interest is absolutely necessary for anyone else to be interested. In ...


5

Magen Avraham (OC 529:2) writes that ideally one should eat Seudah Shlishit before Mincha Ketanah (9½ halachic hours after sunrise), but if he forgot to eat before, he may eat the meal even after Mincha Ketanah.


4

An excerpt from this article in which Rav Eliyashiv is discussion adopting various non-jewish practices there is a source which would seem to prohibit it and is cited as follows the Gra (to Shulchan Aruch [Yoreh Deah 178]) rules stringently, that we are even forbidden to adopt non-Jewish rituals that are based on obvious and positive motivations. Further ...


4

The Dagul M'Rvava (Yoreh Deah, Siman 89) holds that one must wait 6 hours from when he finishes eating meaty until he starts the meal with the milky. Aruch HaShulchan says one must wait from the end of the meaty meal until the beginning of the milky meal. Rav Elyashiv says that the prevailing minhag is to wait from when one finishes eating meaty until he ...


4

From HalachaForToday.com 1) Mayim Achronim does not require a utensil, nor does it require "Koach Gavra, force of a human" like the washing of Netilas Yadayim. The source is from the Mishna Berurah, 181:21 As far as whether to wash into a keili or not, the same site says this: Rather, the water should be washed into a utensil that is designated as a ...


4

Melavah Malkah means escorting the queen. Therefore the sooner one eats Melavah Malkah the better. However, if one is not capable of eating right after Shabbos one may delay the meal until later, however not later than midnight (Shmiras Shabbos K'Hilchoso 63:5, Yechave Da'as 4:25). Kaf HaChaim 300:14 holds that it should L’Chatchila be eaten within four ...


4

Qitzur Shulhhan Arukh, Yalqut Yosef (Orahh Hayim 174:8) states (my translation): ואם התחיל לשתות או לאכול בתוך הסעודה, וממשיך לשתות או לאכול הדבר אחרי ברכת המזון, צריך לברך. And if one started drinking or eating during a meal and continues drinking or eating the item after Birkat HaMazon, one must make a blessing.


4

1.If one eats (regular uncooked) fruit in a meal one should make a Bracha Rishona on the fruit but no Bracha Achrona(S”A 177:2) 2.A cooked dish made from fruit and is served as part of the main meal doesn’t require it’s own Bracha. For example, fruit soup, fruit salad, fritter, fruits mixed with chicken or meat, and fruit blintzes don’t require a Bracha ...


4

Rivevos Ephraim 8:117:14 addresses this and says since there is no kiddush we don't cover the challahs.However,the Rambam(reasoning of the Tur )holds one does make kiddush. The Aruch Hashulchan 291:10.we are noheg not to cover them. The Ben Ish Chai Shana Beit Chayei Sarah 12 holds one has to cover the bread just like the night and day meal even though ...


4

HALACHIPEDIA has part of its entry on Birkat HaMazon that deals with the question. The numbers refer to the references – please see the original especially ref 21. It's not the distraction that matters so much as the time and how hungry you are - see below. How long does one have to say Birkat HaMazon? If one ate bread and is full, preferably ...


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