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1

R. Yisrael Lipschitz writes the following in his introduction to Seder Moed: הכלל העולה דבין ציצית ובין בגדי כהונה א״צ חלזון דוקא אבל צריך בשניהן שיהיה מראה (היממעלבלויא) שאינו משתנה מיפיו ע״י בדיקה שהזכיר הש״ס The principle that emerges is that both by tzitzit and by the priestly vestments it is not necessary to specifically use a chilazon. But it ...


3

As reported here R Shlomo Goren proposed to change the text of kiddush levana, the monthly blessing on the moon's renewal the answer began to emerge within hours of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing [...], the word came from Israel where Gen. [R] Shlomo Goren, the Armed Forces’ Chief Chaplain, issued instructions about a change in the prayer for ...


4

Rabbi Yaakov Kamenetsky and the Moon landing אמת ליעקב פרשת בראשית ודברי רמב"ן אלה הם שעמדו לי בשעה שראינו איך שבני אדם יורדים מעל המטוס ע"י סולם על גלגל הלבנה, וחשבתי בלבי מה יענה כעת הרמב"ם ז"ל שכתב שהלבנה היא בעלת צורה רוחנית, והרהרתי בלבי שכעת נצחה הקבלה את הפיליסופיא, ונחמתי את עצמי בדברי רמב"ן אלו. אבל כפי שאנחנו מתייחסים לדברי הראשונים ...


4

The Lubavitcher Rebbe's reaction from Chabad.org: Yes, the human being has performed something magnificent. There is much in which to take pride. But does that make us so large as to displace G‑d? Just the opposite! We only know the greatness of the Creator from the greatness of His creations. Now that we see He has created a being that is capable of ...


6

Rav Menachem Kasher wrote the first sections of his האדם על הירח in response to this event. Throughout the work he discusses the moon landing from hashkafic and halachic perspectives.


1

The mishna is not referring to reading a lengthy text. It is referring to reading Tanach and reciting Mishnah. We must remember that in the time of the mishna it was forbidden to write down the mishna. To review a mishna, or to analyze one, a person would have to first recite the mishna from memory. To remember the mishna, scholars would reveiw it ...


0

All biblical and cuneiform texts "posit a flat, probably disk-shaped world. The heavens are made of solid material. They are ... dome-shaped, completely enclosing the surface of the earth." Moshe Simon-Shoshan, "The Heavens Proclaim the Glory of God: A Study in Rabbinic Cosmology," BDD 20 (2008): 70. "[The ancient sages of Israel] believed that the earth ...


0

Did the ancients think the world was flat? Many people were primitive in those days and might have thought the world was flat. This does not mean the Bible or even Moshe felt the same. For starters, it is speaking from a human perspective, much like Joshua is speaking from a human perspective when he commands the sun to stand still. We wouldn't say that ...


-1

Maybe they thought that once they got up to the next level they could walk on it, and get around everywhere. Maybe it shows that people who want to fight Omnipresence have not understood their own nature relative to G-d.


7

They are not created, they are formed by means of the natural laws from preexisting matter. This has nothing to do with yesh mai-ayin (creation from nothing) which occurred at the very beginning. We usually talk of star formation in terms of the gas mass that is converted into stars each year. Indeed as Rashi and others point out on Bereishis 1:14 Yesh ...


2

No, the Torah Codes have no merit. There are two core issues: 1) Statistical Improbability - On the surface it does seem to be highly improbable to find hidden "codes" through the use of Equidistant Letter Sequencing" (ELS). The issues is that these same "miraculous finds" have been duplicated using Moby Dick. 2) ELS Coding only works if the text is 100% ...


2

No. The Torah codes and any books about them are fruitless as the Torah text has been changed by many translations. True, that these are small variations and only instances where one letter might have been changed. But by default, if just one letter is changed, it messes with the entire process and forfeits any codes which might have otherwise been derived. ...


0

According to the Bible in general and Genesis 1:27 in particular, Adam was the first human ever created. Adam means man because he was the first person to have a soul (or in Hebrew שפנ), the neshama. That is not to say that Adam was the first Homo sapiens. Adam and Eve had a mother and a father like you and me. What did Maimonides and Nahmanides say ...


-3

The Scholar's definition of a human Scholars have tried to define the definition of man, and many did so differently, as we will see. Plato (c. 427–347 b.c.e.), attempts to give us a definition of a human being and what makes us human. Plato, a student of Socrates (469–399 b.c.e.), (father of the Socratic method), believed in the almost mystical but ...


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