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3

R David Brofsky (in his book Hilkhot Mo'adim, p. 573 and here online) brings sources on all sides of the debate. I have somewhat restructured the text to group opinions and added the sub-titles in bold. (1) Those who argue one can pray before dark but need to wait for Kiddush R. Yeshayahu Horowitz (1565–1630), the Shelah, writes in his Shenei Luchot Ha-Brit (...


-2

I do not claim to understand the following, I only quote what I’ve seen. In Sefer Sifsei Chein hakdama 9 he explains that the sefira of Bina is referred to in the zohar as אם and also corresponds to our foremother Leah. The sefira of Malchus corresponds to our foremother Rachel. Malchus gathers all of the influence from the higher sefiros and pours the shefa ...


2

Why not? God calls us, Israel, His "mother": Listen to Me, My people; and give ear to Me, O My mother... [Isaiah 51:4] The Midrash adds how this struck bar Yochai as supremely significant: [Rabbi Eleazar said:] The Holy One, blessed be He, first addressed Israel as “daughter” [then “sister”, then “mother”.] [As “daughter”,] in "Hearken, O ...


-2

This seems to be a two-part question. Asking whether we can call G-d "mother," and why is G-d referred to as the father. I read Jordan Peterson's book 12 rules for life. In the book, Peterson explained why many cultures, including the Bible, described G-d in masculine terms. He used the example of the Yin and Yang. The Yang is the masculine side, ...


0

I can't think of any halakha that would say no. The shekhinah is considered by many to be the feminine aspect of G-d. We could figuratively call G-d mother, but we must remember that G-d has no gender. G-d is neither He nor She (Rambam).


2

Something which has actually been skipped is the fact that the water used to wash it and soak it before salting must all be cold. If the meat comes in contact with hot water the halachah is that the blood clots there and leads to halachic problems.


3

Since the cash back is a proportion of the cash spent, it fits the definition of a rebate (from Wikipedia: a form of buying discount [...] paid by way of reduction, return, or refund that is paid retrospectively.) And one does not pay maaser on rebates. Indeed Ask the Rav writes (here) One need not separate ma’aser from rebates, even if they are cash back ...


4

See on this Rav Menachem Kasher's long article in Torah Shleyma vol. 29, and specifically section 1 chapter 6, which is on exactly this question. I'll try to summarise: Rav Chaim Kanievsky (Peirush on Massechet Tefillin) writes that Torah scrolls that were written in k'tav ivri from before Ezra's time lost their kedusha, "since they from now on it was ...


6

In Massechet Mezuzah 1:3, we read: שנה אותיותיה או שנכתבה עברית הרי זו פסולה. If you changed [a mezuzah]'s letters or it was written in k'tav ivri, it is pasul. [my transl.] The same can be found in Massechet Tefillin 1:2. Your source in the OP brings Mishnah Yadayim 4:5, in which we read: ‮תַּרְגּוּם שֶׁכְּתָבוֹ עִבְרִית וְעִבְרִית שֶׁכְּתָבוֹ תַּרְגּוּם,...


2

Here are sources on the topic - none of which requires putting in geniza documents with the abbreviations you mention Mishna Brura 85:10 permits erasing God's name in a foreign language - a fortiori then for the above abbreviations The Shakh (Yoreh Deah 179:11) holds a name in a foreign language doesn't have sanctity Kof-K, in a broad survey of sources ...


0

In order to answer such a question, we first must clarify the reason and source for shaking it off. In theory, there could be two bases for not having the charoset as part of what one eats. One is the gemara in Pesachim 115a about having first matza, then maror, then korech, because otherwise the rabbinic maror would nullify the Biblical matzah. By ...


0

The shift was that women were taught much more than just halacha. They were taught Tanach and philosophy. Basically, Sarah Shenirer realized home education was not enough to counter the modern world, so she started a school to teach girls the entire Jewish outlook, which was unprecedented.


2

I heard from people that their mothers were in Europe and they didn't know how to read hebrew. They didn't even know how to recite Birkas Hatorah.


0

They still learned. Just not in schools at home with their Mother. Also Sarah Scienirer's movement was so huge because before the Jewish Girls were required to go to public school.


-4

No it is not permissible. “Those ladies who wear wigs they think its allowed. They say 'no one said its prohibited.' But we do tell them its assur. Thats what the sages said they banned wigs. The great sages, the vilna gaon, the yaabets, the chatam sofer, maharatz chajes and other gedolim as well the all said its assur. So they say, ‘no so how come this ...


2

The Ran in pesachim 115a asks that how come we have charoses on maror and we're not concerned that it will be mivatel the taste of the maror. He answers since its just a dip it's not chashuv since it's the way of eating with this.


1

I'll add some more perspectives to the answers already given here. I've found that a few people have discussed the matter from a halachic perspective: Rabbi Shlomo Goren wrote an essay on the subject, called "The Heroism of Metzada in Light of the Halacha". The essay appeared in a few places, including his book Torat Hashabbat V'hamo'ed, pg. 391-...


4

The essence of idolatry according to Judaism is (Rambam MT Avoda Zara 2:1) the worship of false gods is not to serve any of the creations, not an angel, a sphere, or a star, none of the four fundamental elements, nor any entity created from them. The idolatry which is punished is when someone worships a particular idol in the way it is commonly worshiped (...


3

The question is whether the original item must be "expunged" as-is, or whether simply the value has to be paid back. So the thief isn't gaining either way! As you suggested -- yes, if you modified the item, you keep the item, but instead have to pay back more. The dialogue in the TV show is saying that it still doesn't seem fair that this item per ...


0

I concur with others who have written that hargasha exists nowadays as well. As far as I know all women are aware when they are having a period. Women also commonly find discharges in their underwear without having been aware of anything previously, and that is a kesem. How exactly to treat all the cases in between is a question which I won't get into. The ...


5

Rav Ari Enkin writes While a superficial review of the laws of kiddush would lead one to conclude that one who recites kiddush upon whiskey and the like should be required to quickly drink a revi’it (approximately 4 oz.), just as is the case with wine, there are authorities who insist that this is not necessarily so. These authorities reason that such a ...


3

Rashbam in pesachim 107a explains that chamar Midina is only when there's no wine in the city. Most reishonim go with this requirment. Also the shulchan Aruch and mishna brura as well. The Mishna brura brings the custom of making kiddush on beer on shabbos day. Even after bringing the bidieved defence for it, says that it's still a mitzva min hamuvchar to ...


-5

Yes, they can. Jews pray in Hebrew all the time. Are you confused? That's because Jews are gentiles. The term "gentile" originally meant 'not a Roman citizen'. We are not Romans. If we accept the more modern usage of the word, then Jews are not gentiles. The Bible does call Israel "goy," meaning nation, but not gentile.


-3

I am afraid all the poskim are mistaken. Hargosho is nothing to what they say it is. The pardes rimonim asks if the rechem is open why doesnt it all come out at once why take five or more days. He answers niflaos haborai. Other poskim ask similar questions with similar replies. The truth is they have no idea of how niddah works.So let me explain my ...


-3

By Jewish law a Gentile may read the Tanach (Bible) but not the commentaries as that is already trangressing to the oral law. I will point out that by Jewish law, Reform conversion is null and void as to making you jewish, and therefore, the laws applicable to gentiles will still apply. To be considered valid to become Jewish, you must apply to an orthodox ...


-1

The answer relates to emotional suffering. Halacha doesn't have a strict answer on this because the answer relates to the psychological status of the person. The answer is similar to that used for plastic surgery. Jews are not suppose to alter their flesh unless they have a reason to do so. The obvious being surgery or a medical procedure which is needed for ...


1

Rav Ephraim Oshry addresses this question in his Shailos Uteshuvos Mi'mamakim 5:22 ,and is brought in a summary fashion in the English book "Responsa from the Holocaust". He held that one should not remove such tattoos. Text of Responsa:


2

Rabbi Yoel Bin Nun has a class on this subject, which I recommend listening to. He explains that he disagrees with the Rambam's view in this case. Rambam's view has merit in places such as Avraham's meeting with the angels, because of the usage of multiple "vayera" - Avraham sees himself doing things he normally actually does. However, in the ...


5

The first several pages of Masechet Ta'anit deal broadly with this topic. From the opening mishnah, as well as a beraita cited in the Gemara, it seems that R. Eliezer agrees with you that there is no problem with saying morid hageshem all year round. מאימתימזכירין גבורות גשמים רבי אליעזר אומר מיום טוב הראשון של חג ר' יהושע אומר מיום טוב האחרון של חג אמר לו ...


1

R. Yitzchak Abadi addresses this in Ohr Yitzchak 1:8 איני יודע מקום הספק בזה דממה נפשך אם חם או שזה מפריע לו באמת באיזה אופן שהוא או שהוא מתעמל ומפריע לו או שמפריע לו למלאכתו באיזה אופן וכיוצא בזה אין חיוב ללובשו אז ואם סתם רוצה לפרוק עול הרי הדלת פתוחה וכמאמר חז"ל [שבת דף ק"ד ע"א] הבא ליטמא פותחין לו I don't know what room there is for ...


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