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How does this not contradict halacha 3, that he cannot take wives if it will reduce his food clothing or conjugal duties to the existing wives? Because the Rambam only listed conjugal duties along with the other spousal responsibilities since they still exist. He is clarifying in the next Halacha that they don't exist to the extent the other spousal ...


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If the question is based on Shulchan Aruch 91:3 ( chabad.org/3299176/#v3), perhaps the answer can be found by understanding what's happening when a Jewish man covers his head: The Chabad explanation involves a discussion of the 5 levels of the soul, and that covering the head reveals the 4th and potentially the 5th levels of the soul. Applying this to ...


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I have heard, from sources based in the Rambam hilchos masros (somewhere, don't remember exact halacha at the moment), but it mentioned a case of eating tithed food at the house of one who isn't expert in tithing, and says in general its forbidden unless there is a chaver (one who is known to be an expert in tithes) is also eating there, and it said in the ...


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This practice is halachicly justifiable, although I've never heard of people doing this in practice. The Shulchan Aruch when bringing the machlokes about the order of the parshios brings from the Rosh and other Ashkinazi poskim to have two tefilin shel yad, one in each order. However, it is not so clear that the order of the shel yad changes according to ...


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David decides to take a census II Samuel, chapter 24, records one of the most puzzling stories in the Bible. II Samuel 24:9 tells us that King David took a census that resulted in a plague that killed seventy thousand Israelites. But counting or taking a census in the Bible could be done in order to determine the availability for war, for the division of ...


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From Chabad Chassidus: In Rabbi Aaron Raskin's book "Letters Of Light" the word Yisrael is defined as a contraction. "Jews are called b’nei Yisrael—the children of Israel. Yisrael means both לי ראש—“I am the head,” and שר א-ל—“minister of G‑d.” The footnote for this cites Likutei Torah Devarim. When I say Shema, I am thinking about the entire nation as ...


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It is clear from the context of the source (Devarim 6:4) that it is referring to the Jewish people. For example, the previous verse includes "And you shall listen Yisrael" when discussing obeying the commandments and inheriting the land of Israel. The context of all these verses is Moshe talking to the Jewish people: Chapter 5 begins with "Moshe called to ...


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Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 47:13 rules that one who wakes up early to learn should make birchot hatorah before he starts learning, even if that is before the start of daylight. One does not repeat the blessings after it becomes light.


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It depends. Why do you want to learn about this topic? If it's just casual curiosity, I see no reason not to listen to your father. But, if it's out of a personal intellectual need, I would say your father's approach is foolish and dangerous. We live in an age of overexposure. Plain and simple. Anyone harboring any doubts will be quickly exposed to those ...


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There are many types of chazakos and rovs, so it's good to define our terms before we compare them. What both of them have in common is they tend to address sefeikos, or uncertainties. Chazaka D'MeIkara חזקה דמעיקרא Basically, assume what was, will be. For example: חזקת כשרות, חזקת פנויה, חזקת אשת איש, חזקת איסור, or in English: something is still kosher, ...


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Rav Moshe Heinemann explains in his sefer on Medical Ethics (1:4) The main issue with getting vaccinated which we need to consider is not so much the question for yourself – if you don’t mind getting the disease, then that’s your choice. You have a right to make that choice. However, the main question is spreading the disease to someone else who ...


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This isn't a direct answer, but it is useful relevant information. There is a book called Sefer Hamafteach that is an index of the entire talmud. So for example if you wanted to see all sugyot related to Sukkah, you could look up the entry and find those that aren't in the expected Masechet. There is both a hebrew and english edition. http://hamafteach.org/


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There are indeed opinions which essentially understand certain forms of chazakah as a rov. For example, R. Yisrael Isserlein writes in Terumat HaDeshen 207: חזקה שאינה פוסקת שהיא באה מכח הרוב כמו החזקה אין עדים חתומים על השטר אא"כ נעשה גדול וכן חזקה אין אדם פורע בגו זמנו וחזקה שאין אדם עושה בעילת בעילת זנות דכל הני חזקות באים מן הרוב כלומר רוב בני אדם ...


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R' Shlomo Zalman Aurebach (Minchas Shlomo Siman 91) quotes Reb Tzvi Pesach Frank, the Rav of Jerusalem, as ruling that one who cannot say Birchas Hatorah is forbidden to learnt Torah. R' Shlomo Zalman himself disagrees, ruling that just because one cannot fulfill his obligation of Birchas HaTorah, it is not a reason not be fulfill obligation of Limud Torah....


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If you are prohibited from reading Five Proofs for the Existence of G-d, try Rebecca Goldstein's (Jewish) 36 Arguments for the Existence of G-d. Jokes aside, Maimonides wrote in his monumental Guide of the Perplexed that, the truth is the truth no matter what its source. He, therefore, had no quarrels accepting the philosophy from the Greek pagan Aristotle. ...


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Your dad is right. If you want to learn mathematics, learn from a mathematician, even though many chemists could do a creditable job. If you want to learn French, learn from a Frenchman, even though many Italians could do a creditable job. Who did God choose to reveal His Torah to? Who introduced God and the word of God to the people? Who has an ...


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Both are usually associated with assumptions and clarifications in areas we lack certainty . The difference between them is what the assumption is based on. Rov means majority. The assumption is being based on the statistical likelihood. Additionally, a Rov/majority can influence the status of the minority in Halacha. For example, if a small amount of ...


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The terms can be used in slightly different ways (much as in the same way that the definition of "fact" changes when you compare it to "fiction" or "opinion") but one way to understand it is as follows: A Chazaka has more depth because it inherently requires more "time" depth, more data points, to draw a conclusion. Examples: A Rov: The dice has four red ...


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Piskei Teshuva (Rabinowitz) 233/1 1st # brings MBerura is not yotzei tefila bedieved after 6 before 6:30, and there are those that are yotzei bedieved. Commenting there he says (bracket numbers are his footnotes): even the saying of Korbonot(2) and Arshrei(3) should be after 6:30. And also(4) on Shabbat and fast days dont read the Torah before 6:30. ...


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Given that we say kaddish on the yahrtzeit even though the neshama is assumed to be in Gan Eden, we should say kaddish for the first 11 months in any case. We would be saying kaddish so that the neshama should have an aliyah no matter how small any aveiros might be or even if the neshama immediately is placed at an initial level in Gan Eden. I am assuming ...


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Acknowledging a distinction between the following and a full body, the Mishna (Ohelos 4:2) says that one is allowed to burn a piece of a dead body, seemingly for convenience: תֵּבַת הַמִּגְדָּל, יֶשׁ בָּהּ פּוֹתֵחַ טֶפַח וְאֵין בִּיצִיאָתָהּ פּוֹתֵחַ טֶפַח, טֻמְאָה בְתוֹכָהּ, הַבַּיִת טָמֵא. טֻמְאָה בַבַּיִת, מַה שֶּׁבְּתוֹכָהּ טָהוֹר, שֶׁדֶּרֶךְ ...


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The source for saying Kaddish for the deceased is from Kalla Rabbasi 2:9 (as mentioned by the Darchei Moshe Y.D. 376:8): ט ברייתא קטנים מקבלים פני שכינה שנאמר זרע יעבדנו יסופר לה׳ לדור: [גמ׳] איבעיא להו מכפרין עון אבות או לא, ת״ש דר׳ עקיבא נפק לההוא אתרא אשכחיה לההוא גברא דהוי דרי טונא אכתפיה ולא הוה מצי לסגויי ביה והוה צוח ומתאנח, א״ל מאי עבידתיך א״ל לא ...


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First and foremost we do not rely on dreams since many times they are nonsensical. In fact ,the Noda B'Yehuda writes in Yoreh Deah Tinyana siman 30 he notes that dreams are not reliable and writes " where do we ever see halacha learned from a dream!?!?".further in the teshuva he writes " to bring a proof from a dream is nonsense and nothing at all". ...


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While dreams "can" be prophetic, the likelihood of them being so is low for the average person. The reality is we aren't supposed to take dreams this seriously as we're advised the majority of our dreams are either nonsense, reflections of the previous day, or expressing issues within ourselves. There is actually a bit discussed about the topic in the ...


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Well we know what month it went into effect. As I see it, this is a side-effect of the dispute over who wrote the last 8 verses of the Torah. There are strong indications that Moshe's role was to transmit the Torah to us. "Torah tzivah lanu Moshe -- Moshe commanded us the Torah" (Devarim 33:4). R Simlai uses this verse to derive the number of 613 mitzvos --...


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Dailyhalacha explains The first case is having a non-Jew return a cooked dry food to an open flame. The Be’ur Halacha (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) rules in siman 253 that it permissible because it constitutes a Shvut D’Shvut, a Rabbinic prohibition on a Rabbinic prohibition. That is, telling the non-Jew to violate Shabbat is ...


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In the podcast Daf Yomi for Women (soon to be renamed Hadran Daf Yomi for Women), the speaker, Michelle Cohen Farber, does say Hadran at the conclusion of masechtot. She doesn't have a man say it for her and the women who learned with and from her. She does not, as far as I recall, say kaddish because there is presumably not a minyan of men present. A ...


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Sounds like it might be similar to a case in Choshen Mishpat 395:1, where Reuven provokes Shimon's dog into biting, and it bites Reuven himself. In that case Shimon is exempt from paying for the damages, because "when someone acts inappropriately, and then someone else further acts inappropriately (and the combination results in an injury)," the second party ...


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Rav Dovid Feinstein can be seen wearing his yarmulka on in his tefillin straps: Video :https://youtu.be/Jd7hxgmqYQA In Sefer Daas Noteh, Rav Chaim Kanievsky, in footnote 15, notes that it may not be correct to have one's hat resting on one's actual tefillin shel rosh, but writes that it's not actually forbidden from din since its needed for tefillah. So ...


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Hiring an idolater to do work for you is the same as purchasing something from an idolatrous merchant. The Sources are full of examples of the latter, which is obviously allowed. So the former is allowed also. (To be sure, there are restrictions on trade with idolaters around the time of their festivals. They are described in tractate Avodah Zarah (Ch. 1)...


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I don't think it's a full answer, but here is a source that IMHO should be considered: משנה בבא בתרא פרק ו משנה ב המוכר פירות לחבירו הרי זה מקבל עליו רובע טנופת לסאה תאנים מקבל עליו עשר מתולעות למאה מרתף של יין מקבל עליו עשר קוססות למאה הקנקנים בשרון מקבל עליו עשר פיטסות למאה: Mishna Baba-batra 6:2 One who sales fruits to another, [The buyer] ...


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I offer this incomplete answer as a contribution to developing a better answer. Rambam Hilchos Genevah, 1 (2) states: The Torah prohibits stealing even the slightest amount. It is forbidden to steal as a jest, to steal with the intent to return, or to steal with the intent to pay. All is forbidden, lest one habituate oneself to such conduct. So ...


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Defining chovas gavra as an obligation on the person to light a candle (potentially only at the person's own doorway - similar to tefilin requiring the person's own arm), and chovas object/cheftza as an obligation on the person to ensure that his doorway has a candle lit, along the lines of mezuza and ma'akeh. It is clear from Shabbos 23a that it is an ...


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In order to answer, it is important to clarify the question. Although it is obvious the Torah only obligates people (objects can have no obligations or restrictions), the question is about the exact classification of the obligation: Is the mitzva a chovas gavra - [which I will define as] an obligation which is not bound to specific circumstances (similar ...


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The light of the Hanukkiah is said to be an extension of the light of the Menorah in the Beit Hamikdash. Therefore one is not allowed to use the light of the Hanukkiah for normal secular matters such as reading or in our times taking a picture. However, our practice is to have an extra light (often called a Shamash by Ashkenazim) to be a source of "secular" ...


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This is the psak of Rav Eliyashiv


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There is plenty of material available online, e.g., this summary on Jewish Perspectives on End-of-Life Care from MyJewishLearning Treatment of Terminally Ill Patients According to Jewish Law by Dov Linzer in AMA Journal of Ethics The Terminally Ill Patient from Prof. Avraham Steinberg of Shaare Zedek hospital a translation of all relevant responsa of R ...


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The Rivevos Ephraim 5:428 addresses this . He brings Mishna Berurah 671:30 which notes that if one lights in a place that is less than 20 amos and then moves it to another place which is also lower than 20 amos one is yotzeh,since both places is kosher. He also brings the Shaar Hatzion 34 brings the Machtzis Hashekel and says this is pashut(obvious). However ...


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This article by R David Brofsky addresses (what seems to me to be) an equivalent question: When one goes away for Shabbat, for example, and returns home on Saturday night, where should he light Ḥanukka candles that night? Is his status determined by the place where he slept the night before or the place where he intends to sleep that night? Some suggest ...


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Like all things in Halacha it depends on the situation. There are also additional consideration like Hasogas Gevul that would come into play even when there is no intrinsic trade secret or copyright issues. As far as the Gemroah in Avoda Zorah is concerned that was a unique situation of a common life and death illness without a well known cure. The CHAVOS ...


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Perhaps the question can be reformulated. The case of the SA is understood by the OP eventually as this. The child is a mamzer and the SA says he's not chalal. Can we infer that a mamzer can be a kasher kohen? First, the source is a statement in Gemara (Kiddushin 77b) Regarding how a woman becomes Chalala. Soncino's translation A halalah results from a ...


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