New answers tagged

-1

I have heard, from sources based in the Rambam hilchos masros (somewhere, don't remember exact halacha at the moment), but it mentioned a case of eating tithed food at the house of one who isn't expert in tithing, and says in general its forbidden unless there is a chaver (one who is known to be an expert in tithes) is also eating there, and it said in the ...


6

I have non-Jewish guests fairly often (board games are a good way to spend Shabbat afternoon...). Here are some things I do: Wine: just use mevushal. Why risk either offense or waste? Your human guests are way more important than having the nicest possible wine. I use a "night light" in each bathroom rather than leaving the regular lights on. It's way ...


0

Dailyhalacha explains The first case is having a non-Jew return a cooked dry food to an open flame. The Be’ur Halacha (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) rules in siman 253 that it permissible because it constitutes a Shvut D’Shvut, a Rabbinic prohibition on a Rabbinic prohibition. That is, telling the non-Jew to violate Shabbat is ...


5

There is nothing in the Nazirite vow which gives one special physical strength, and a non-Jew does not become a Nazirite. https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/287358/jewish/The-Nazir-and-the-Nazirite-Vow.htm Male or female Jews can become nazirites, but non-Jews cannot. For more details, the source of this rule and the talmudic logic behind it,...


Top 50 recent answers are included