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1

If the judge of your Beit Din is doing a single prohibition from the Torah, from the Torah itself or from the Rabbis, it is forbidden to go to them and your conversion can become invalid later.


2

I was closely involved in a case one month ago of a 14-year-old convert with a (non-custodial) Jewish father. The boy's mother's written consent was required for the gerut to take place.


1

As an issue of halacha apparently you don't have to. If you did then we would be locking the door of conversion to anyone who grew up in a very anti-Semitic family. The Midrash Tanchuma (Mishpatim 5) discusses the conversion of Onkeles, nephew of Roman emperor Hadrian.He did not inform there beforehand but used a ruse beforehand to avoid his wrath afterwards....


2

I'm not seeing a black-and-white rule on this one, but any wise beit din (conversion panel) should look at the whole picture -- are we setting this person up for success? Are there any red flags here? (How often does the candidate intend to interact with their non-Jewish family? How old/independent is everyone? What is their "game plan" for said ...


1

The Talmud [Yevamot 62a; also Bekhorot 47a] discusses the matter in the context of whether the child he had as a non-Jew qualifies him for having fulfilled the commandment to be fruitful and multiply. The Shulchan Arukh [Even HaEzer 1:7] rules as follows: If he had sons in his lifetime and he was an idolater and all parties converts (to Judaism), his ...


1

Following on from my comment - I came across the following online from Rabbi Hayyim Angel who has an interesting piece here. He explores two historical issues that were a point of dispute about those wishing to convert. Namely, a non-Jewish partner seeking to get married but not necessarily with religious motivation and then following on from this the ...


6

Rambam Hilchot Issurei Biah 12:17 writes: All non-Jews when they convert and accept upon themselves all of the Torah's commandments ... are considered as Israelites for all matters ... He goes on to note that for converts from four nations (Ammon, Moab, Edom, and Egypt) certain restrictions are placed on whom they and their descendants may marry, but that ...


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