New answers tagged

2

Rav Heinemann (Shidduchim through Sheva Berachos 5:19) writes It doesn’t matter who breaks it. The chosson or kallah can break the plate if either one wants. One of the guests can break it if they want. The minhag is that the mothers of the chosson and kallah break it together, but it doesn’t have to be that way. If the mothers aren’t living then ...


4

One approach is suggested by a 'Rabbi Yochanan' quoted in the commentary of the Sefer Marit HaAyin of the Chida on Berachos 17a. The Gemara discusses a special reward reserved for women, and explains how they merit it: אֲמַר לֵיהּ רַב לְרַבִּי חִיָּיא: נָשִׁים בְּמַאי זָכְיָין? בְּאַקְרוֹיֵי בְּנַיְיהוּ לְבֵי כְנִישְׁתָּא, וּבְאַתְנוֹיֵי גַּבְרַיְיהוּ ...


2

Visiting the sick aids one in his battle against the Evil Inclination: Nedarim 40a Protecting against the evil inclination with Teshuva (repentance) and Gemilut Chasadim (good deeds): Nedarim 32b Seemingly, women are obligated to do Gemilut Chasadim which doesn't have a fixed time as stated in Pea 1,1, אלו דברים שאין להם שיעור הפיאה והביכורים והראיון ...


2

There are many poskim with answers to this question. Note that there are various opinions as to why we say this bracha in the first place, so not every posek uses the same assumptions in order to draw their conclusions. Here are a few of the major opinions: Rabbi Jacob Chagiz, (17th century, Morocco, Italy, Israel) - Say it for a girl. He follows the ...


1

The Peri Megadim (O.C. 225:5) asks why one does not say this blessing for a girl, and explains that if you assume that the reason for saying it for a boy is that the father is punished for not educating his son, this would be inapplicable by a girl. However, he notes that according to the Levush's explanation that the son gets punished for the father's sins, ...


Top 50 recent answers are included