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2

According this article of Rabbi Yisrael Rozen of Tzomet institute, it might not even be a muktze. He states that changing the power of existing electrical current in Shabbat is not forbidden: כך פסק הר"י נויבירט (שמירת שבת כהלכתה לד,כח) בשם הרש"ז אוירבך: מכשיר חשמלי בשבת לכבדי שמיעה מותר להם להשתמש בו בשבת, ובתנאי שהמכשיר יהיה מופעל מבעוד יום. ...


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According to your description, the clock sounds like a כלי שמלאכתו לאסור. In that case it would be permissible to move it if you needed the space it occupies (e.g. someone left it on the couch), לצורך מקומו. It would also be permissible to move it in order to do a permitted action such as reading the time it displays, לצורך גופו. With this type of muktzeh, ...


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I have non-Jewish guests fairly often (board games are a good way to spend Shabbat afternoon...). Here are some things I do: Wine: just use mevushal. Why risk either offense or waste? Your human guests are way more important than having the nicest possible wine. I use a "night light" in each bathroom rather than leaving the regular lights on. It's way ...


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Dailyhalacha explains The first case is having a non-Jew return a cooked dry food to an open flame. The Be’ur Halacha (Rav Yisrael Meir Kagan of Radin, 1839-1933) rules in siman 253 that it permissible because it constitutes a Shvut D’Shvut, a Rabbinic prohibition on a Rabbinic prohibition. That is, telling the non-Jew to violate Shabbat is ...


3

The key issue in the question is that by saying the words: וַתַּבְדֵּל ה' אֱלֹקֵינוּ בֵּין קֹדֶשׁ לְחֹל, בֵּין אוֹר לְחשֶׁךְ, בֵּין יִשְׂרָאֵל לָעַמִּים, בֵּין יוֹם הַשְּׁבִיעִי לְשֵׁשֶׁת יְמֵי הַמַּעֲשֶׂה.‏ You have distinguished Hashem, our God between the sacred and the secular, between light and darkness, between Israel and the peoples, ...


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