New answers tagged

0

I think you've missed something somewhere. You said: I would expect God to reveal something far nobler, like "and he will bring this world to perfection" or "and he will serve Me devotedly and make a dwelling for me on Earth". My response is that God said exactly that, but not in as straightforward a way. This is how I read the verse: ...


0

Perhaps the answer lies in challenging the initial assumption. The OP writes: G-d consults angels...and presents them with what looks like His vision of Man's goal on Earth Where do you see that he is presenting a vision of Man's goal in life with the latter part of the sentence? I think that if G-d is presenting such a vision, it is with the first part of ...


1

In a discourse on Shabbos Shemini 5716, the Lubavitcher Rebbe recommends three different approaches to deal with Timtum Halev (the state of insensitivity in which one’s heart is dull and unresponsive to his contemplation of G-d’s greatness): “A wooden beam which does not catch fire should be splintered, and similarly, a body into which the light of the soul ...


1

If your question is understood properly, being careful to consume only chalav Yisroel dairy products would be the appropriate response. Although I don’t have the sources in front of me at the moment to give specific references, this is discussed both in Igrot Moshe (the responsa of Rabbi Moshe Feinstein) and in the Igrot Kodesh of the Lubavitcher Rebbe. Bli ...


0

It is not that G-d cares or need to see people doing small mitzvot. Rather, by preforming these small seemingly irrelevant mitzvot, we are showing our dedication to G-d. If a person decorating a cake adds all the small details that will please his wife he is doing so to show affection. Thus, when we care about the small details, we are telling G-d that we ...


2

The requirements of one fulfilling the 7 commandant's of Noach is clearly mentioned in the Rambam laws of kings towards the end, that one must accept them because Hashem commanded Moshe at mount sinai, that Noach was earlier commanded regarding them, and the Rambam adds that if one merely fulfills them because one logically understands them etc then they are ...


0

We do so because, if Hashem had not taken us out of Egypt, we and successive generations would still be enslaved there. There was no other way for us to leave Egypt except the way it occurred.


0

We thank G-d because He was the one who took us out of Egypt. Additionally, G-d did not put us in Egypt, Joseph's brothers did when they sold him to slavery. The moral of the story is teaching a lesson that acts have consequences. To your last sentence, even if we accept the way things are, we should still thank Hashem because He is the ultimate source ...


1

You're right. We aren't thanking Hashem for taking us out. Instead, we're thanking Hashem for a few things: Putting us in Egypt in the first place, purifying us to be on the level to receive the Torah. Revealing himself to us through the miracles he did to us while taking us out. Making us his nation, and us becoming his slaves.


0

1.) At the "covenant between the parts": ... He said to Abram, “Know well that your offspring shall be strangers in a land not theirs, and they shall be enslaved and oppressed four hundred years; The Exodus came after 210 years of slavery — so we are grateful that we were saved 190 years. (See Rashi to Beraishis 15:13.) 2.) The Egyptians exceeded ...


0

Maimonides would answer "no." According to Maimonides, the world functions according to the laws of nature that G-d created. Maimonides explains: I agree with Aristotle...I do not believe that it is through the interference of Divine Providence that a certain leaf drops [from a tree], nor do I hold that when a certain spider catches a certain fly, ...


0

According to some, this appears to be the case. Nachmanides was convinced that G-d was constantly involved in the world, from a falling leaf to the winter snow. He wrote that there were no laws of nature. He felt that there was such a thing called "hidden miracles." He writes: “From [belief in] large perceptible miracles one [comes to believe] in ...


1

I dont think it would be appropriate. The Talmud (Shabbat 88b) relates that when Moshe Rabbeinu went up to Heaven to receive the Torah, the angels protested: they wanted it for themselves. With the help of G-d, Moshe challenged the angels on several points relevant to our case, most notably: What else is written in it? The Holy One, Blessed be He, said to ...


1

Rabbi Gershon Chanoch Henoch Leiner of Radzin writes in his Sod Yesharim in the name of his father the Bais Yaakov that the understanding of the Gemara is not that it would have been better for man not to be created, for if that were the case the Gemara should have said טוב לו לאדם וכו, rather it says נח לו which means that it would have been easier for man ...


-4

This is an interesting subject on which there has been much debate. I was chatting with a rabbi about this on Facebook yesterday. I shared with him two essays that deal with the topic of kosher bots. Here is a brief summary, in my words, of what the author wrote.[1][2] The author argues that there is no such thing as a "Jewish look." The concept is ...


Top 50 recent answers are included