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It doesn't seem to have been started by any one person and it seems like the system was in effect right from when they entered Eretz Yisroel based on general Torah principles of tzedaka, communal living and communal responsibly. The Gemora in Sanhedrin lists a Kupa as being among the ten things that a city must have or a Talmid Chochom may not live there. ...


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Melachim II 6:1-2: וַיֹּאמְר֥וּ בְנֵֽי־הַנְּבִיאִ֖ים אֶל־אֱלִישָׁ֑ע הִנֵּֽה־נָ֣א הַמָּק֗וֹם אֲשֶׁ֨ר אֲנַ֜חְנוּ יֹשְׁבִ֥ים שָׁ֛ם לְפָנֶ֖יךָ צַ֥ר מִמֶּֽנּוּ׃ The disciples of the prophets said to Elisha, “See, the place where we live under your direction is too cramped for us. נֵֽלְכָה־נָּ֣א עַד־הַיַּרְדֵּ֗ן וְנִקְחָ֤ה מִשָּׁם֙ אִ֚ישׁ קוֹרָ֣ה ...


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Traditional editions of the Hagada all share roughly the same core text, and many surround it with various kinds of commentary and supplementary materials. The core text itself is authorized by tradition; in that sense, I would say that any edition that includes the traditional core text is qualitatively more authoritative than one that does not. Other than ...


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To answer the second question (Nic answered the first question in depth so see his great answer) Raban Yochanan Ben Zakai was the Nasi - head of the Sanhedrin according to Tosfos Avoda Zara 13a: רבן יוחנן בן זכאי שהיה נשיא קודם ר"ג משכה נשיאותו עד לאחר חורבן כדתנן (ר"ה דף כט:) משחרב בית המקדש התקין רבן יוחנן בן זכאי Rabban Yochanan Ben Zakai was the ...


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1) Rabban Yochanan ben Zakai was almost certainly Nasi for some time after the destruction of the Second Temple. Per the Iggeret of Rav Shrira Gaon (written 987CE): "ולא מצאנו אדם שנקרא "רבן" חוץ מן הנשיאים רבן גמליאל, רבן שמעון, רבן יוחנן בן זכאי, רבנו הקדוש." My Translation: and we haven't found anyone who gets the honorific "rabban" outside of ...


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The following link is a rough translation into English of an introduction that appeared in a reprint of Sefer Shomer Emunim in 1965. It was originally written by Rabbi Yitzchok Stern of Givat Shaul in Israel. It was intended to be read together with Sefer Shomer Emunim which is considered an introduction to learning the Sod aspect of the Torah. It gives a ...


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Prisha to Tur Orach Chaim 288:14 explains: פי' מצלאין נוסח של ברכות הלועזים לחולים מתחיל מצלנא אנחנא כמו שמתחיל שלנו מי שבירך כו'‏ Matzla'in means a version of a foreign [Aramaic] blessing for sick people which begins maztlana anachna (we pray), analagous to how our prayers begin mi sheberach (He Who blessed). For a version of this prayer, see ...


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In Rav Elya Weintraub's sefer Nefesh Eliyahu- Hakdamos V'Shiurim, he has an essay where he dedicates part of the essay to explaining the development of Kabbalah from Rav Shimon Bar Yochai to the Vilna Gaon.


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The Western Wall in its entirety was built by King Herod. And yes the stones are quite impressive. This is one of the wonders of the ancient world (I think Josephus calls it that). The top half of the wall was destroyed with the Temple and rebuilt cheaply over the years. For a full treatment of who built what of the Temple Mount walls, see Ritimyer's book ...


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http://hebrewbooks.org/8360 Author is Rabbi Refael Katz Zatzal


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I don't have a count, but I can give some rules about its appearance, and from that we can make an estimation. In narrative portions, the vast majority of verbs introduced with a vav (which is most verbs) use the vav hahipuch. (This includes the beginning of verses, chapters, books, even the first word of the Prophets at the beginning of Yehoshua.) Also in ...


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The question of rare and raw meat has been asked on this site before. There is some discussion among the Rishonim based on the mishna Beitza 3:3 about whether raw meat can be consumed, but their point of argument revolves around whether the meat must be salted first to remove the blood. So the opinion of the Rishonim seems to be that it may or may not be ...


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Taken in the context of your quote, historically speaking it would be referring to the generations which preceded Avraham. As the Torah of Moshe relates, this is dealing primarily with the generation of Enosh and later, up to the the time of Avraham. That is also how Rambam recounts the development of idol worship in the Mishneh Torah, Hilchot Avodah Zarah ...


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I’m not sure what you mean about “a tradition”. I think every Jewish mother desires that her son should be someone great, but that doesn’t mean they necessarily hope their son should be Moshiach. This of course is ignoring the fact that not every Jewish mother could have such a dream - the Moshiach is to be descended from King David and unless you are ...


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Hindus worship the dust of the feet of the followers of one of their gods: http://kunjeshwari.com/sweettexts/English/bhakta.pdf Brahmarshi Bharat has clearly declared to King Rahugan that there is no other way to gain divine knowledge without serving (consuming, revering) the dust of the holy feet of the great devotees – “O Mahârâj Rahugan, unless ...


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Not aware of anything like that. But for whatever it's worth, here's something close -- King David's wives all wished that their respective sons would inherit the throne. King Solomon's mother, Batsheva, actually won by asking for something some-sum, while the others all asked for something zero-sum. Sanhedrin 70a: כל נשים של בית אביך היו נודרות יהא לי ...


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