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In the context of the other coins minted during the revolt and siege of the 1st century, it is not surprising that the depiction of the species is less photographic of "full sets" and more representative of the mitzva and of the holiday. The symbol may have been an act of rebellion in itself, bringing distinctly Jewish practice, whose restoration they were ...


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The Vilna Shas is relatively recent (it was published in 1886). It was the most extensive Talmud ever printed at that time, including dozens of early commentaries printed for the first time from manuscripts, as well as later commentaires, all painstakingly edited by talmidei chachamim. It took them six years to prepare the new edition. As such it was a ...


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I think that many of your assumptions are incorrect. It's hard for me to offer the most appropriate reaction without knowing where you live and what you have experienced. But, I have lived in about 5 different communities and I have spent Succot in Israel. I can tell you from personal observance that Succot has far from lost its status and a big deal is made ...


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Since both (all) groups you mentioned accept the written Torah as divine (to say nothing of other shared social/cultural similarities) there are certainly many many items of agreement. I would presume all would generally prohibit eating pork, adultery, or worshiping idols and so forth. Nevertheless, as these groups mutually identified themselves as distinct ...


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Rabbi Uri Sherqi says (starting at 36:30) that we don't find any sources mentioning a separation of men and women during הקהל: פלא הוא שהיה במקדש מעמד אחר שבו היו יותר גברים ונשים מאשר בשמחת בית השואבה ושם לא הייתה מחיצה: בהקהל. במעמד הקהל פעם בשבע שנים באו כל ישראל אל בית המקדש - גברים ונשים וטף - ולא הייתה מחיצה It is a wonder that there was an [...


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Mishnah Zevachim 14:4-8 describe the times that bamot were permitted and forbidden: Before the mishkan was set up - bamot permitted Once the mishkan was set up in the desert - bamot forbidden While the mishkan was in Gilgal - bamot permitted While the mishkan was in Shiloh - bamot forbidden While the mishkan was in Nov and Giv'on - bamot permitted Once the ...


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I believe that humanity invented raiding (robbing, stealing, kidnapping) before warfare. warfare demands some kind of society and government. Bearing in mind that Avram was seriously outnumbered (~300 vs combined army of five major kingdoms) and outclassed (herdsmen vs experienced soldiers), going hand-to-hand in a battlefield would be downright suicide, so ...


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In the Haggadah, we have the story of Bnei Brak, and R' Eliezer appears there. Therefore, he must not have been in Cherem yet. That same story also includes R' Elazar ben Azaria saying "Harei ani keben shiviim shana", referring to something that happened during the "Maariv" dispute. This implies that Bnei Brak happened after "Maariv". As such, I ...


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Well, it's almost written explicitly that Maariv Chovah or Reshut is latter, read forward, you will see that it's the "last straw" that cause our sages to overthrow Raban Gamliel. Note: R' Eliezer eventually causes the death of Raban Gamliel, so most chances he was still excommunicated when R' Elazar Ben Azaria was nominated, and even after Raban Gamliel ...


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