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I will address three of your points mentioned in your question. "G-d may have created this universe using a matter that existed before the "beginning"" In his Guide of the Perplexed 2:25, Maimonides says that the Torah could be interpreted to be saying that G-d formed the world out of preexisting (eternal) matter. For example, it could be that bara, “...


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Yes, Ralbag does say that God does not know (certain aspects of) the future. See Book III of Milchamot Hashem for his full treatment of God's knowledge. The basic idea is that God's knowledge of man's future actions is limited by man's free will. God knows what man will likely do, based on his makeup and the celestial influences, but man has the ability to ...


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While we accept God's Infinity and Transcendental existence as theological truths, we also see that in the Torah God is presented as close and accessible, almost anthropomorphic. The Torah is not coming to teach us abstract truths, but to teach us how to relate to God and His Ways. It has no interest in discussing God's inaccessibility. Instead, it shows us ...


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Whereas I, in contrast, think that it's G-d's very infinitude that makes revelation possible. If you have a class of 5 students, the teacher can pay attention to each student. If we up the number to 10, there typically still isn't a problem. But class sized of 25 or 30? At some point you're talking about college lectures, where the teacher just puts a "one ...


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Many biblical statements are not meant to be taken literally. Genesis 6:6 tells us that G-d “reconsidered that He made man on earth, and He was sad of heart.” If taken at face value, this passage suggests that an all-knowing G-d can change His mind, or worst, have regrets. But can G-d regret? This is contrary to the philosophical understanding of a G-d ...


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