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In the meantime I heard an answer I think was addressing my issue in the best way: It is not the fact that the Egyptians got struck at the sea, rather that they get their last, final struck, from which there was no rescue. All ten plagues before was only partial, and they were also middah k'neged middah, and corresponded to all the tortures they caused to ...


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I like Chizkuni's analysis: כי בדבר אשר זדו עליהם; Yitro explains what had prompted him to say that he now realises that the G-d of the Israelites is greater than any other deity. The reason is that when analysing the method by which G-d imposes penalties on the sinners, it becomes evident that the punishment matches the sin committed. The Egyptians’ crime ...


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We know Hashem can influence man to sin. Omnipotence. The question is: Would He? There are different approaches to what happened with Par'oh. The Rambam says that yes, Hashem will take away the possibility of teshuvah. This is a potential punishment for sin, if the sin is egregious enough. So, what happened to Par'oh could happen to others. Hilkhos Teshuvah ...


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