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According to many commentators (Ibn Ezra, Chizkuni, Sforno) לא תנאף does not only mean "Do not commit adultery". It ALSO includes any type of prohibited sexual acts. According to the Talmud (Niddah 13b) the verse also includes proscribes male masturbation. תנא דבי רבי ישמעאל "לא תנאף", לא תהא בך ניאוף בין ביד בין ברגל Rashi (ibid.) ביד - מוציא זרע לבטלה [...


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The "big ten" are basically category headers for the major categories of Mitzvos (see Rashi on Shemos 24:12). Stealing is the archetypal example of property crimes, and "Do Not Steal" is the main prohibition is the larger category of property crimes and respecting others property, generally. Adultery is the archetypal sexual sin, and it serves as the header ...


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Rashi on that Passuk (based on the abovementioned Gemara in Sanhedrin) writes that while the event with the blasphemer occurred chronologically at the same time as the one who collected wood on Shabbos, they were incarcerated in separate prisons since it was unclear what punishment the blasphemer would get, while it was known that the wood collector was ...


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Originally, the word "Yehudi" meant someone from the Tribe of Judah. When Solomon's Kingdom split into two territories (Israel and Judah), "Yehudi" came to mean someone from the Land of Judah, regardless of tribal affiliation. We see how Mordechai, who was from the Tribe of Benjamin, was called a "Yehudi", simply because he was among the exiles in Babylon ...


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There are some interesting explanations to כֹּ֣ל הַ֭נְּשָׁמָה that you will find here. All of them refer to humanity, not to animals: Ibn Ezra views the entire Pslam in terms of its original aspect that it was sung and played on the harp (with probably accompanying instruments such as the ugav, cymbals, etc.) as stated in the words of the Psalm itself. ...


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Midrash Tanchuma (Parshat Vayeilech Moshe # 2) refers to it as Parshat Vayishma Yitro: וזהו תורה צוה לנו משה כמנין תורה צוה לנו משה והשנים צוה הקב"ה כמו שפרשתי בפרשת וישמע יתרו Ramban (commentary to Genesis 43:20) refers to it in the same way: ועוד לפנינו בפרשת ויגש אליו אמר לו יהודה בייא אתה מעביר עלינו שכך אמרת לנו ואשימה עיני עליו זו היא השמת עין ...


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Maybe it's to highlight the fact that he added an extra Parsha (Shmos 18:21) into the Torah, as Rashi informs us: יֶתֶר, עַל שֵׁם שֶׁיִּתֵּר פָּרָשָׁה אַחַת בַּתּוֹרָה "וְאַתָּה תֶחֱזֶה" ‏


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Here's the simplest solution: "דברה תורה כלשון בני אדם" The Torah spoke in the language of [lay]men (lost of sources here) The Sages have a simple explanation for numerous hoaxes found in the Torah - it was written for laymen in a layman language. So for people who don't care about biology or zoology, the simplest observational feature is "can fly". ...


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I'm not 100% sure if this is the answer I'm looking for. If someone has a comment to confirm, or a better answer, please feel free. I'm not really sure what he is saying; it sounds more like the place fixes the character traits than the Leviim who are there, but one could be a byproduct of the other. I found the Shem MiShmuel (the son of the Avnei Nezer), ...


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Rambam speaks about this in his Guide for the Perplexed (1:2:1): Further observe the passage, "And the eyes of both were opened, and they knew they were naked" (Gen. 3:7): it is not said, "And the eyes of both were opened, and they saw"; for what the man had seen previously and what he saw after this circumstance was precisely the same: there had ...


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