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I heard an awesome answer in a Dvar Torah given at our shul awhile ago: The idea starts from the selling of Yosef into slavery: The Yishmaelim who took part in the deal were said to be "...a caravan of Ishmaelites coming from Gilead, their camels bearing gum, balm, and ladanum to be taken to Egypt." (Genesis 37:25) Gilad is significant to the story as it ...


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More background on the conversation between Hashem and the Sotton is useful to understand this. Hashem had said that Iyov was a tremendous Tzadik. The Sotton responded that he really wasn't such a Tzadik, he just has everything going for him. Were he to find himself in difficult straits he would no longer be such a Tzadik. The Sotton was correct about ...


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There's a difference between saying something foolish and outright blaspheming. Also, as per Rav Dessler's doctrine of nekudath habechira (see Michtav Me’Eliyahu - Kuntrus HaBechira) the goalposts may move - i.e. one is still accountable for one's choices but the expectations (and responsibility) are lowered by more trying circumstances.


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No. In his work called Chelek, Maimonides writes that those who take Midrashim literary are "fools," while those who reject them out of hand are also "fools." Midrashim are imaginative parables, sermons designed to teach moral lessons. People should mine Midrashim for lessons about proper behavior.


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How to really understand the Bible Good question. For one, anthropomorphic statements about G-d should always be taken figuratively as metaphors. For example, Maimonides understood the "Garden of Eden" story to be a parable. Ralbag understood that the sun did not really stand still for Joshua at Gibeon, this was a feeling Joshua felt "as if" the sun stood ...


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The simple answer is that this determination is not much different than other determination about the meaning of a text, which is made on a case-by-case basis. One has to use logical analyses of the information presented, both inherently (regarding clues in the text itself) and in a broader context, including whether or not there is a relevant and reliable (...


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Sanhedrin 19a and Megillah 13a allude to your question. They say that a person who raises a child is like the person who bore him. Since Pharaoh's daughter Bisya raised Moshe, he is given the name that she called him. According to the Gemoro, Moshe's other names are mentioned in Divrei Hayamim 1 4:18. Moshe is the name by which G-d wants us to know him. I ...


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As stated by @Gershon Gold, the locations are disputed. The following is the version from Sefer Seder Ha'dorot: ויקברו את ארונות מטות אבותיהם בנחלת בניהם, את ראובן וגד בעבר הירדן ברומא, ושמעון ולוי בעיר מנדא אשר נתנה לבני שמעון ויהי מגרש העיר לבני לוי, ואת יהודה בעיר בנימין נגד בית לחם, ועצמות יששכר וזבולן בצידון בחלק אשר נפל לבניהם, ודן באשתאול, ונפתלי ...


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In addition to the other excellent answers, Yosef would also be motivated to know if these were the same men who sold him into slavery out of envy. Knowing that at this point his youngest full brother would most likely be the favorite of their father, he shows great favor to that one (with a greater portion of food at dinner) and sees no jealousy, and then ...


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Yerushalmi Sota 8b Chapter 1 Halacha 10 says that all the 12 Shevatim were taken to Eretz Yisrael by their Shevet. תלמוד ירושלמי סוטה דף ח' ע"ב, פרק א' הלכה י' – ככתוב בראשית מו אנכי ארד עמך מצרים ואני אעלך גם עלה מה ת"ל גם עלה. אמר אותך אני מעלה ושאר כל השבטים אני מעלה מלמד שכל שבט ושבט העלה עצמות ראש שבטו עמו Regarding where in Israel the individual ...


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However, afterwards, when the goblet had been discovered in the travel bag of Binyamin, they no longer mentioned the death penalty but offered themselves collectively as slaves to Joseph [Tur HaAroch, Genesis 44:9 - I believe this is in reference to Genesis 44:16] https://www.sefaria.org/Tur_HaAroch%2C_Genesis.44.9?lang=bi ויאמר יהודה מה־נאמר לאדני מה־...


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Just came across this today so I figured I better post it... According to Or HaChaim on Genesis 30:2 https://www.sefaria.org/Or_HaChaim_on_Genesis.30.2?lang=bi ויחר אף יעקב Jacob became agitated...[because] ודברי הצדיקים אפילו בסדר זה יעשו רושם the words of the righteous even when okay [conditionally] make an impression. I also found a ...


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RaSh”I provides the following interpretations: ובגוים לא יתחשב: כתרגומו, לא יהיו נעשין כלה עם שאר האומות, שנאמר (ירמיה ל, יא) כי אעשה כלה בכל הגוים וגו' אינן נמנין עם השאר. דבר אחר כשהן שמחין אין אומה שמחה עמהם, שנאמר (דברים לב, יב) ה' בדד ינחנו. וכשהאומות בטובה, הם אוכלין עם כל אחד ואחד ואין עולה להם מן החשבון, וזהו, ובגוים לא יתחשב: and will not be ...


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Shadal seems to say that Yaakov wouldn't mind if he would have died (46:30) הלואי ואמות עתה, כלומר אין רע אם אמות עתה, אחרי ראותי שאתה חי, ואם עתה אמות, אמות בשיבה טובה - I wish I would die now, meaning it wouldn't be bad to die now that I see you're alive. And if I die now then my death would be at a good, satisfying time Though Rashi quotes a Midrash ...


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I'll translate what he says and perhaps that will make it clearer. It seems that Yaakov didn't believe that Yosef had actually died, as he never saw him (subsequently?) in a dream/vision. Rather, he held that it must be that Yosef became mentally ill (lit: his mind was torn up), and he lives amongst the animals. Since there's an animal called a jackal ...


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medrash (panim acherimm B”.) says... haman said ... I can kill him on the spot but I won’t because I need all to see and teach him a lesson what happens when you do this to haman


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True that we humans are commanded to (make an effort to) be fruitful and multiply, as in the verse from Genesis you quoted. But after all, it's in G-d's hands whether such efforts will bear fruit, and in fact the same prophet Hosea earlier (9:12,16) speaks of G-d preventing the sinners' children from growing up. Rashi on 14:9 explains: Ephraim: will say, ...


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