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No. There is no evidence that the deceased ever visited or interacted with a live person, be it a dream or an actual event. Reason dictates that truth is what we can experience. Thus, no-one has ever experienced conversing with the dead. So why does the Torah prohibit this act? Because it's impossible. They couldn't possibly respond because they're dead. ...


6

Eduyot 5:6: שֶׁכָּל הַמִּתְנַדֶּה וּמֵת בְּנִדּוּיוֹ סוֹקְלִין אֶת אֲרוֹנוֹ Anyone who dies in a state of excommunication, we stone his coffin


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A dead body, once the soul has left it, represents a source of impurity and a Kohen (priest) is prohibited from coming in contact with such a source of impurity. The Kohen's wife is not excluded from the list. Rashi (on 21:2) explains that "the relative that are closest to him" includes his wife. See also the gemara in Yevamot 22b that it only includes his ...


1

Chazal determined that the anguish of Inuy HaDin - having to wait around on death row - is far too great a punishment, and everybody deserves to be spared that anguish. Similarly, Chazal determined that it's way more painful to be executed by stoning (i.e. being thrown off the 2nd floor and then being pelted with rocks) when dressed, and thus instituted ...


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In kabbalah there is a very specific technical explanation of מיתה בנשיקה (literally "death via kiss"). See Emek HaMelech section "Gate of Tohu", Chapter 67. Hebrewbooks link - around the second column. One of the principal spiritual workings of creation is via יחודים (unions). One specific union is נשיקין (kissing), in turn there is a "higher" and "lower" ...


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