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1

In Tehillim 106:19-20 it does in fact refer to the golden calf as both an eigel and a shor(bull): יעשו עגל בחרב וישתחוו למסכה. וימירו את כבודם בתבנית שור אכל One can suggest an analogy that though every eigel could be defined as a shor, not every shor can be defined as an eigel because if the animal has grown to proportions of an adult, it can no longer ...


0

All your answers are fundamentally flawed. First of all, what's kosher or treif is not based on looks or preconceived notions, but simanim. The OU, whom are in the hechsher business, writes: Rabbi Belsky was asked about a salmon (a kosher fish) that was engineered with genes from an eel (non-kosher), enabling it to grow faster. Kosher fish are ...


1

Beheima means a land animal, or roughly "a mammal." Thus: If you sacrifice a mammal, it must be a head of cattle or a sheep/goat. Skip ahead to verse 14: If your sacrifice is a bird, it must be a turtledove or common dove. Rabbi Aryeh Kaplan's translation spells that out: When one of you brings a mammal as an offering to God, the sacrifice must ...


2

I would say that בהמה comes to exclude a חיה (see Difference between behema and chaya) and then the Torah explains that what types of בהמה are acceptable: מן הצאן - which means the ovicaprid family מן הבקר - which means the bovine family. This serves to exclude other possible kosher animals which might be considered a בהמה (like a buffalo according to ...


3

I attended a pidyon petter chamor in Pittsburgh in 2017. It was organized by the Kollel and attended by many of the local Orthodox rabbis (and lots of other people). Unfortunately the web site they set up at the time is no longer there (and not in the Wayback Machine), but I have a video (linked on my blog post about the event). In the (first, ...


3

R. Yitzchak Abadi has a responsum (Ohr Yitzchak 2:51) about allowing seeing-eye dogs inside the synagogue. He cites R. Moshe Feinstein's responsum on the matter (mentioned in Gershon Gold's answer) and rejects R. Feinstein's Talmudic interpretations that justified his permissive ruling. As for the issue that a blind person will never be able to attend the ...


-1

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 100:1) seems to draw a distinction between a "בריה" (a whole animal) and "ואבר מן החי" by listing them as separate distinct entities: "בריה דהיינו כגון נמלה או עוף טמא וגיד הנשה ואבר מן החי וביצה שיש בה אאפרוח וכיוצא בהם" "A creature (that is, something like an ant or an unkosher bird, or a sciatic nerve, or a limb of a living ...


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