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R' Yehudah ibn Tibbon, one of the great translators, laid out the rules for translating in the preface to his translation of Chovos Halevavos. The translator must know the language of the original book The language he is translating into and understand the content This way, he can adapt from one language to another without creating confusion by being ...


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That seems to be right. Genesis 1:2 reads: “Now the earth was tohu vavohu and darkness was upon the face of the tehom and the ruach elohim hovered over the face of the waters.” No one knows seems to know what tohu vavohu means, but it denotes unformed or unfashioned matter. It seems that it is denoting that the world was unformed before creation as if G-d ...


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It is possible that Adam and Eve had dozens of other humans to populate the world soon after creation. Although there is no proof that there were other humans during the time of Cain and Abel, the Bible often hides and does not reveal its secrets so that the reader can figure them out on their own. For example, we know that when Adam and Eve bore Seth Adam ...


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Verse fifteen tells us that the Eternal One took Adam and placed him there in Gan Eden with the task: L’avdah (לעבדה) Ul’shomrah (ולשמרה), which is often translated as ‘to work it and keep it’. The point I want to make is that l’avdah doesn’t necessarily has to refer to tilling the earth, because after the sin of Adam and the cursing of the ground, one reads ...


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It strikes me that “shomer” in this context can only mean to stand guard, protect and defend. The question then has to be, “From whom?” The traditional rabbinic gloss of mitzvot strikes me as political in nature (i.e., keep the flock following the Halacha). We read in this parsha that there are others on the planet other than Adam and Eve (e.g., the ...


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וַיִּוָּלֵ֤ד לַֽחֲנוֹךְ֙ אֶת־עִירָ֔ד וְעִירָ֕ד יָלַ֖ד אֶת־מְחֽוּיָאֵ֑ל וּמְחִיָּיאֵ֗ל יָלַד֙ אֶת־מְת֣וּשָׁאֵ֔ל וּמְתֽוּשָׁאֵ֖ל יָלַ֥ד אֶת־לָֽמֶךְ: And Irad was born to Enoch, and Irad begot Mehujael, and Mehijael begot Methushael, and Methushael begot Lemech. Rav Hirsch explains that this is because מחויאל (in his youth) became מחייאל as a result of the ...


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The Kli Chemda says that Adam had a din Yisrael since he kept Shabbos. I think that after the chait he lost that status of Yisrael. Also I suggest that when the Avos fixed the sin of Adam that's when they got the din Yisrael. Meaning Yisrael is a state of Adam before he sinned. Not completely because we're still mortal, but to an extent... The chida and ...


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The Chanukas Hatorah (hashmatos) answers this question by adding another question. Why does the gemara add that the snake saw their honor and was jealous. He explains the reason why the gemara added that part to the question was to show that this incident took place before the sin of the Eitz Hadaas. Therefore the animals were also immortal since they weren'...


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Some answers that came to mind: When the Tosefta says the snake wanted to kill Adam, it is non-literal and just means it was in competition with Adam. The way we would picture such competition in a human scenario is that A would even want to kill B. Hava loved Adam so she would not agree to do such a thing. The snake did not know that would kill Adam. The ...


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Well a few reasons one can suggest. That Adam was immortal before eating from the Eitz hadaas. It's a machlokes in achronim if that means he was naturally immortal or couldn't be killed as well. If Adam didn't sin, he can't be killed. Because you need to sin to be punished. However what is asked in the body paragraph, seems to be a different question. I ...


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