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17

Human breastmilk is 100% kosher once it has left the woman's body (Shulchan Aruch YD 81:7). Furthermore, it is pareve, but shouldn't be cooked with meat to avoid issues of Marat Ayin (ibid. 87:4).


16

When you open the sealed bulk carton, they can no longer know that it has been certified. It is the same reason that an airline kosher meal must be served to the passenger still sealed. Once it has been unsealed, the certification no longer applies. One way to handle this is to have the Jewish chaplain be there when it is opened and seal the individual trays....


12

This answer has been marked "community wiki," which means that it's open to all1 to edit. Please do! Please preserve the alphabetical order of the list. If you do not see something on the list, consider that it may be alphabetized by the product name or the brand name. Please include the date at which you obtained your information. Outdated information (...


10

Although the Torah says not to cook "in the milk of the mother", this is a common example, since the mother's milk is at hand. In actuality any meat is forbidden with any milk. (Tur Yore De'a 87, Shulchan Aruch YD 87:2)


10

Apparently, some Dannon yogurts (with K) and Yoplait yogurts (with KD) are under the supervision of Rabbi David Sheinkopf and Rabbi Barnett Hasden, respectively. (Regarding Rabbi Hasden's hashgacha, see this related question). I do not know whether either of those rabbis provide supervision with kashrus standards that are widely considered acceptable. (...


10

While I can't comment specifically on the issues involved with powdered milk and splitting them into single servings I can make a few suggestions: Look into kosher single serving packets ( I don't know if that fits the constraints of the jail budget) but there are plenty of companies (e.g. Carnation, etc.) that are certified kosher. Consult with a Jewish ...


9

We learn in Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim 328:33 סימן שכח - דין חולה בשבת: לג גּוֹנֵחַ, מֻתָּר לִינֹק חָלָב מֵהַבְּהֵמָה, דְּבִמְקוֹם צַעְרָא לֹא גָּזְרוּ רַבָּנָן. וְיֵשׁ אוֹמְרִים שֶׁאִם אֵין לוֹ אֶלָּא צַעַר שֶׁל רָעָב, אָסוּר לִינֹק מֵהַבְּהֵמָה בְּשַׁבָּת ‏ Somebody with [some kind of] heart issues may suckle directly from an animal on Shabbat [...


7

Yoni is correct, companies ask for kosher certifications for all sorts of reasons. (I know a rabbi who had his phone ringing off the hook from two American sugar companies begging for certification. Neither needed it from the laws of kosher per se, but both were hoping to sell to a confection company that had made a simple blanket rule, "all our suppliers ...


7

Dannon has OU Certification on some products. The ones with a plain K are certified by Rabbi Dr. David I. Sheinkopf. Those products contain Beef Gelatin which some Kosher Certifiers will allow even if the cows were not slaughtered in a Kosher manner. I imagine that Dannon doesn't say the D because it is considered obvious. That used to be standard practice ...


7

Very good question with a simple answer. It used to be made from rennet obtained from the cow's 4th stomach. I recall that almost all Miller's and Migdal cheeses were made this way. As to why this is kosher as well as not considered mixing meat and milk, see this article and this M.Y. question . As this method has become costly and, perhaps, the market has ...


7

I think the question confuses three different status of milk chalav Israel: milk from kosher animals (e.g., cow, sheep) whose milking was supervised by a Jew -- and is kosher according to all opinions chalav stam ("plain milk"): milk from kosher animals whose milking was not supervised by a Jew. R Moshe Feinstein (YD 1:47-49) held that, in countries with ...


6

Nitei Gavriel Shavuos 29:1 note 1 mentions from Kovetz Bais Talmud that in the times of the second Bais HaMikdash they used to eat on Shavuos (לפתות מלחם ומלח (חלב. This sounds a bit like cheesecake to me.


6

OU.org says the cone does not need a brocho; it is subordinate to the ice cream. Even if ice cream is eaten in a cone, only Shehakol is necessary, since the cone is eaten only because of the ice cream and is clearly subordinate to it. Its purpose is actually not so much to be eaten as to hold the ice cream and to prevent the hands from becoming ...


6

Kashrus Agencies are often asked by food and other product companies for certification, even when halachically no certification is required. The companies are told that there is no technical need for certification but many proceed with obtaining certification nonetheless for a variety of reasons: their competition has certification, the belief that the ...


6

The Torah mandates "simcha" on Yom Tov. The Talmud understands "simcha" to refer to eating meat and wine. Hence, the obligation to eat meat on Yom Tov. The exact parameters of this obligation are subject to much debate among the Poskim. The fours assumptions you quote are held by some Rabbis and rejected by others. As always, ask your LOR. The obligation ...


6

Interestingly the Pitchei Tshuva on SA YD 89:1, in the context of eating meat after milk, brings an opinion from Beer Heitev shel Maharit that these could be shaot zemaniot. He quickly writes the Pri Megadim, Hokhmat Adam and Knesset Hagedolah disagree and the minhag is not to use shaot zemaniot. עבה"ט של מהרי"ט ז"ל אם הם שעות זמניות. ועיין כו"פ ופמ"ג ...


5

I asked them and received the following reply from Rabbi Moshe D Gutnick (with permission to post here): In NZ all ethanol is produced from whey and is Dairy. Therefore all ethanol based alcoholic beverages such as Vodka produced in NZ must be considered dairy. Beer was also included in that as a precaution. However it is now quite clear that none of the ...


5

The Ben Ish Chay (year 2, B'shalach 20):Sometimes people make the aforementioned yogurt before Shabas: they heat milk, put it in a receptacle, and put a little made yogurt (or other binding thing) so this milk will harden and become yogurt. It's done by morning.But sometimes they see in the morning that it's still milk: it hasn't hardened to become yogurt. ...


5

For those who want a sourced response check out this great article: margarine misconceptions and maris ayin. Basically we follow the Kreisi Upleisi's exception that once something becomes common it lessens the prohibition of maris ayin. Nowadays no one would think twice about "buttering" your bread with margarine etc.; the same would apply with soy milk. ...


5

I emailed the OU with this question. Here's their response: Likely this cheese would indeed be pareve, but because of confusion (maris ayin) one would need to treat it like cheese. And one would not be permitted to eat it with meat. Since these products are not yet commercially available, and the OU has not been asked to certify these products, the OU ...


5

All dairy products are forbidden with meat products. The law is that three aspects are forbidden. Meat and milk products (including butter and cheese) may not be cooked together Meat and milk products may not be eaten together Mixed milk products and meat may not have any benefit (such as selling to a non-Jew) I have shown two articles that discuss this ...


4

See here footnote 38, which discusses the OU policy about countries that at least have the regulation, even though they don't have government inspection. (Basically the OU will allow it if they find the company to be in fear of the government). This ends up including China, Poland, Lithuania, and Ukraine. However, I have heard from someone in the Kashrus ...


4

Say "m'zonos" and nibble a bit off of the lip of the cone, or eat some other food that has the same b'racha.


4

There is a reason for it. The Mechaber in OC 451:26 says: כו. כלי זכוכית אפילו מכניסן לקיום ואפילו משתמש בהן בחמין אין צריכים שום הכשר שאינם בולעים ובשטיפה בעלמא סגי להו. הגה: ויש מחמירין ואומרים דכלי זכוכית אפילו הגעלה לא מהני להו וכן המנהג באשכנז ובמדינות אלו My loose translation: Glass vessels even if one stores in them and even if they were ...


4

There is quite some controversy among contemporary Rabbis as to what constitutes hard cheese nowadays. Dose of Halacha has an extensive article discussing the various opinions and halachos: Exactly what constitutes ‘hard cheese’ is a matter of much debate. Fatty, greasy cheese and cheese that has developed holes would both qualify as ‘hard’ (See Taz and ...


4

I feel the need to post this because of the widespread misconception on this topic, as evidenced by Daniel's comments above, and the number of agreements to them. It is a major Machlokes Haposkim as to whether or not one may drink "Chalav Stam/Akum" if there is significant reason to believe that the Goy has not added milk of any non-Kosher animals. ...


4

The answers already given here discuss the loss of the certifying seal, but miss an important part of the general difficulty around the handling of Kosher food -- Kosher food handled with non-Kosher implements can become non-Kosher. As an extreme example, if you scooped out the powdered milk with a scoop that had previously been used to measure shrimp ...


3

You can ask the OU to confirm, but yes, they have a Jew present constantly when the cheese is being made. They may have some days where the cheese is not Kosher and they have arrangements to have that sold as non-Kosher. Yes, that is expensive. Next to meat, it is the most expensive form of Kosher certification. See here: The supervision provided by ...


3

There is a limit as to how much information the kosher manufacturers are interested in displaying on their products and a limit to what the average kosher consumer will appreciate and understand. Many kosher products, particularly national brands, want to appeal to the kosher conscious consumer but don't want to make the kashrus information too obvious ...


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