22

The short answer is no. Waiting between consuming meat and consuming dairy has nothing to do with how much time we perceive to have elapsed but with the experience of the person who consumed it. Spaceman Ploni, who decided to eat meat immediately prior to takeoff (a revolting thought), can still taste it when he returns to earth, despite the fact that his ...


19

The reason one "becomes fleishig", i.e. cannot eat dairy after eating meat, is because of remaining meat in his mouth or esophagus which he cannot have with milk. Now, the Shach and Taz (and Baer Hetev after them, all at 87:3) say there's no meat-and-milk prohibition on eating milk with pork (or other non-kosher animals), so I'd have to assume there's also ...


19

I do not have the precise location but I was taught that the Yalkut Yoseph brings down eight answers/considerations to this question. Here are some highlights: According to Rashi the milk was served first which is entirely permissable. According to the Maharal, Avraham only fulfilled the positive commandments while the Gra brings opinions that he wasn't ...


18

See here for more. Basically, if you look carefully in Biblical Hebrew, g'di actually means "a young animal" -- usually if you didn't specify it meant a goat, but it could be a generic term for any young. Thus elsewhere it might specify g'di izim -- "a young goat." So that gives us "don't cook a young animal in its mother's milk." Why the thing about "...


18

Fish and locusts are Pareve. Shulchan Arukh YD 87:3


16

Chulin 8 / Yoreh Deah 87:3 - Rabbi Akiva holds that the prohibition of eating chicken with milk is Rabinnic (M'Drabanan) - the reason is to avoid confusion as people consider chicken meat. Fish would not be confused as it does not require slaughtering, however chicken does require slaughtering. Once eggs are laid they are completely developed; and they ...


16

To your last point, traditional caviar comes from sturgeon fish, which are not kosher. Eggs from kosher fish, such as whitefish, are kosher, so you can find kosher-certified "caviar" made of such eggs.


14

Rabbi Bleich is very well-respected in the kashrus industry, and he has a tremendous amount of practical industry know-how. I'm not sure how anything he said here would be "out on a limb." An "OU-D" can mean any of the following: Product is halachically dairy. Product was made on dairy equipment. (I.e. don't eat it with meat, but you could eat it ...


13

There are 2 approaches in halacha for distancing meat to dairy (see Shach YD 89:5). The Gemara says the distance is from meal to meal. Some interpret this as needing to bentch on your meat and start your milk at a different meal- the upshot being to distinguish it through separate meals. Others interpret the gemara as waiting the amount of time sages ...


13

Chabad explains that aged cheeses (those that have undergone fermentation) are sufficiently strong to require a wait. They quote the following from OUKosher: What qualifies as hard, aged cheese? According to Jewish law, this is cheese that is aged for six months or so. However, since modern manufacturing techniques enable cheese-makers to develop hard ...


12

The Minchas Yaakov 76:5 quotes the Kol Bo that one may employ leniencies to fulfill the custom of eating milchigs after Mincha on Shavuos, when less than six hours have elapsed since the meat meal after Shacharis, provided one has cleaned his mouth from the meat between his teeth. Yet, he concludes that it is better not to do so. In addition, the Poskim ...


12

(Taken from OU article here): How long must one wait after eating meat before eating dairy? The Talmud relates that the great sage Mar Ukva contrasted his approach to waiting after eating meat with that of his father: “If Father would eat meat now, he would not eat cheese until the next day at this time. I, though, will not eat [cheese] at this meal, ...


11

Shulchan Aruch, YD 87:3: אינו נוהג אלא בבשר בהמה טהורה בחלב בהמה טהורה אבל בשר טהורה בחלב טמאה או בשר טמאה בחלב טהורה מותרים בבישול ובהנאה "[The prohibition] is only relevant with regards to meat from a kosher animal in milk from a kosher animal, but with regards to meat from a kosher animal in milk from a non-kosher animal or meat from a non-kosher ...


11

Who said that raw meat is inedible? The Shulchan Aruch rules in Hilchot Shabbat that raw meat is not Muktzeh on Shabbat since there are people who eat it as a delicacy (ie Steak Tartar).


10

The sefer "Zikaron L'Moshe" (pg. 65) writes that the Chasam Sofer originally understood that the reason one must wait six hours after meat, is because that is how long it takes to digest the food, and therefore this only applies to one who ate a meal in the day. However, when one sleeps the food digests quicker, and he may eat milk even before six hours are ...


10

Rav Eliezer Melamed says that if the meat meal is finished and it is a matter of waiting the prescribed time (6 hours) then one should taste the hershey bar (or ice cream in his example) and rely on the Rishonim that say you don't have to wait rather than make a Beracha for no reason. This does not apply when one is in middle of a meat meal, as there is no ...


9

The Sefer הכשרות by רב יצחק יעקב פוקס explains as follows (chapter 3:5) For Sefardim, as long as the item is not ben yomo (has not been used for cooking with dairy/meat) in the last day, it is permissible to change from Dairy to Meat, even lechatchila. Sources: Pri Chadash YD 97:1, Chidah - Machzik Beracha 509:2, Aruch haShulchan YD end of siman 89 and 181:...


9

If you last ate meat at 1PM, and you normally wait 6 hours, then you can eat dairy at 7PM. It makes no difference what you've done in between. If you ate something you shouldn't have earlier, we don't penalize, but neither do we say you can eat whatever you want. Rinsing your mouth would probably be advisable, but not required -- nothing about "prohibited ...


9

It is subject to current societal standards. Aruch HaShulchan (YD 101:21): כבר נתבאר דחה"ל תלוי לפי המקום ולפי הזמן והכל לפי ראות עיני המורה It has already been explained that chaticha hare'uya lehischabed depends on the place and the time, and it all goes according to the way it appears before the [particular] rabbi. An important aside, the ...


9

If he eats meat, gets onto a fast plane and flies east, and lands before six hours have elapsed for him, I don't think anybody would say that he can now eat dairy just because the clock shows a later time. For that matter, he doesn't get to jump the gun when switching to Daylight Saving Time. (But citation needed.) I would expect the same logic to apply ...


9

Although the Torah says not to cook "in the milk of the mother", this is a common example, since the mother's milk is at hand. In actuality any meat is forbidden with any milk. (Tur Yore De'a 87, Shulchan Aruch YD 87:2)


9

Babylonian Talmud, Hullin, 116a: עוף איכא בינייהו ר' עקיבא סבר חיה ועוף אינן מן התורה הא מדרבנן אסירי ור' יוסי הגלילי סבר עוף אפילו מדרבנן נמי לא אסיר תניא נמי הכי במקומו של רבי אליעזר היו כורתין עצים לעשות פחמין לעשות ברזל במקומו של רבי יוסי הגלילי היו אוכלין בשר עוף בחלב לוי איקלע לבי יוסף רישבא אייתו לקמיה רישא דטיוסא בחלבא ולא אמר להו ולא מידי כי אתא ...


9

The Malbim explains that he created a calf using Sefer Yetzirah which can be eaten with milk. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=40102&st=&pgnum=168


8

The Torah's prohibition of cooking a young animal in mother's milk, as stated above, applies to mammal's meat in mammal's milk. Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch writes that meat is about taking, and milk is about giving. As birds don't have "mother's milk", there is no Biblical prohibition on chicken-cooked-in-milk. However, the rabbis of the Talmud prohibited ...


8

It is discussed in Darkei Teshuva (89:5). He brings an authority that says one may not eat until he is sure 6 hours have passed (or whatever one's customary waiting time may be), and that the general rule of ספק דרבנן לקולא does not apply here. He then brings several others who disagree and believe that the rule does apply here and one may eat dairy if he is ...


8

See @YDK's answer to this related question. Edit: Summary: Definite particles must be removed after 6 hours (plus a mouth rinse). Unknown particles are of no concern.


8

http://www.star-k.org/kashrus/kk-kosher-cons-handbk.htm (footnote 10): One must also wait six hours if he ate french fries that were fried in oil previously used to fry chicken. Therefore, if one eats french fries (or other deep fried items) prepared in a fleishig restaurant, he should assume that he is fleishig unless the certifying agency of the ...


8

Just because something is called a "delicatessen" and serves traditional Eastern European fare does not mean that the restaurant and its food conforms to the ritual and dietary standards of Kosher laws. Under these laws, meat and dairy are consumed separately and a restaurant, if it wanted to have rabbinical supervision, would have to serve one or the other. ...


8

Mishne Berurah (Biur Halacha 216:2 s.v. haMusk) writes that one should not deliberately smell nonkosher food out of concern that they may be tempted to eat it. He reiterates his position in regards to smelling Chametz on Pesach which is also assur bahana'ah and all year long people eat it that one may not smell it on Pesach. However, closing one's nose is ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible