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24

the question is more cultural than religious. The notion of mayo and white bread plays to the stereotype of the WASPish cuisine as opposed to the traditional eastern-european influenced foods which would have one expect traditional deli fare of pastrami on rye with mustard and maybe a pickle. the issue of dietary law is not at play here.


23

It is very considerate of a Muslim to care about helping Jewish people protect the laws of kashrut. I assume it is because the Muslim is motivated by fear of Heaven and care for a fellow human being. There is no known problem in Kosher law which would restrict Muslims from contact with Kosher bakery goods. (to my knowledge) Thanks for asking.


21

That is correct and many observant Jews eat this bread (I lived in France for five years). The same is true for many sorts of plain bread, not just baguette. However one has to check that the oven is only used for plain bread and not for other specialties with cheese or meat, if the supports used in the oven are not covered with grease and if they use the ...


17

The halacha you're citing is not a leniency that whatever is harmful to dogs is not food. It's a stringency that, even though chametz is no longer fitting for human consumption, as long as it remains a suitable feed for animals such as dogs, the prohibition applies. Anything which is considered food for humans doesn't even enter the discussion.


16

The animal is part of the antelope family and has split hooves and chewes the cud. I would always consult a rabbi, as this answer is not a halachic dictation. Based on the information in your link there seems to be little not-kosher about the dik-dik. In the wikipedia entry you cite: chewing the cud: Like all even-toed ungulates, they digest their food ...


15

To get Kosher meat takes three main steps: choosing the right animal, killing it in the proper way, and removing non-kosher parts from it. (This is all an oversimplification, of course.) Choosing the right animal Kosher land mammals are those who chew their cud and have split hooves. Kosher birds are those that aren't one of the ones listed as not kosher ...


15

Based on Footnote 3 of Halachically Speaking Volume 5 Issue 12 (which seems to also be the source of the text in the question): If Mister Jones has two restaurants, one kosher one not-kosher, and I certify the kosher one, I occasionally go into the non-kosher restaurant to make sure that nothing there claims to be certified by me. I never would have ...


15

In British English, "corn" can mean any grain, not just maize (the plant native to America). See Merriam-Webster; Wiktionary.


14

Yes, someone who eats impure food becomes impure themselves (Rambam Shar Avot Hatumah 8:10). However, this needs some perspective. Niddah is one kind of impurity, and another one is that of a corpse (see Numbers 19). The procedure for purifying oneself of Niddah-impurity is by using a mikvah which can and is done today regularly. The procedure for purifying ...


14

The Talmud explicitly addresses this. Berachos 38b-39a אמר ליה רבי ירמיה לרבי זירא רבי יוחנן היכי מברך על זית מליח כיון דשקילא לגרעיניה בצר בצר ליה שיעורא אמר ליה מי סברת כזית גדול בעינן כזית בינוני בעינן (והא איכא) וההוא דאייתו לקמיה דרבי יוחנן זית גדול הוה דאע"ג דשקלוה לגרעינותיה פש ליה שיעורא דתנן זית שאמרו לא קטן ולא גדול אלא בינוני וזהו ...


13

There are a number of kashrut issues regarding drinking coffee from coffee shops, such as: Ingredients of additives (to those fancy flavored coffees) Chalav Yisrael (for those who keep it) Maarit Ayin Status of keilim (esp. considering their cleaning) Cup and spoon used to drink the coffee Bishul Akum Various contemporary opinions range from being ...


13

R Gil Student addresses this question here and, following a recap of the gemara and Shulkhan Aruch you cite, responds the posekim have unanimously permitted this, but their rationales vary R. Moshe Feinstein (Iggeros Moshe, Orah Hayim vol. 5 no. 13) rules that one should ask the person to recite a blessing but, if he refuses, to serve him food anyway ...


12

Nitei Gavriel Nesuin 2 - 80:21:38 says that the source for saying L'Chaim on wine is Sefer Hapardes L'Rashi, Ravia Brachos 120, Tanya Rabsi 24, Bach Orach Chaim 174. The reason is that since wine brought a curse on the world when Noach drank and cursed Canaan therefore we say L'Chaim when we drink it. He also mentions in the name of the Baal Shem Tov not to ...


12

In regards to your "first" question, the reason that we do not say hagafen before they are processed should really be asked the other way around, which is why do we make hagafen after it is processed, as opposed to any other fruit which does not get a more specialized blessing? The answer is given in Berachos 35b that since wine is סעיד ומשמח, typically ...


12

Welcome to Mi Yodeya! In answer to your first question, the Ramban on that verse asks your question - that is a lot of bread! He suggests that Avraham knew they were angels (which is consistantly the opinion of the Ramban) and the massive bread serving was a type of "gift" to Heaven. In answer to your second question, he stood by them to be ready to get ...


12

Where the product is made directly from the whole vegetable as with Kellogg's corn flakes the brocho is Hoadomoh. Where the vegetable has been mashed and reconsituted the brocho is shehakol. (see p 31 of the Handbook for the Halochos of Brochos). You can see this from the different brocho for Kellogg's and Kemach corn flakes at Star-K online and the brocho ...


12

Inasmuch as I believe @loewian's answer is the correct answer, I would add that according to one approach (this is the approach taken by Levushei Mordechai siman 86 and Divrei Malkiel 4:22:6, and accepted as Halacha by R' Blumenkrantz (of the publication "The Laws of Pesach")), the halacha of "would not be consumed by a dog" is only applicable to a food ...


12

You're thinking of Shoftim 7:5 וַיּ֥וֹרֶד אֶת־הָעָ֖ם אֶל־הַמָּ֑יִם (ס) וַיֹּ֨אמֶר יְהוָ֜ה אֶל־גִּדְע֗וֹן כֹּ֣ל אֲשֶׁר־יָלֹק֩ בִּלְשׁוֹנ֨וֹ מִן־הַמַּ֜יִם כַּאֲשֶׁ֧ר יָלֹ֣ק הַכֶּ֗לֶב תַּצִּ֤יג אוֹתוֹ֙ לְבָ֔ד וְכֹ֛ל אֲשֶׁר־יִכְרַ֥ע עַל־בִּרְכָּ֖יו לִשְׁתּֽוֹת׃ So he took the troops down to the water. Then the LORD said to Gideon, “Set apart all those ...


12

There is something like you mention in the Talmud Yerushalmi in Demai 7:1: Rebbi and Rabbi Yossi were invited as guests to eat at the home of a certain man. However, the Rabbis suspected that he did not properly tithe the food being served, and they wanted to attempt to tithe the food secretly. Their suspicion was noticed by another man who told the owner ...


11

See this interesting article by Rabbi Yirmeyahu Kaganoff about the production of olive oil. He discusses the issues of fraud in the market and notes that different kashrut organizations have different views on the matter. He quotes the OU as not requiring certification on extra virgin olive oil only (virgin olive oil still needs). He also quotes the Eida ...


11

A vegetable dish that makes a nice presentation is stuffed peppers. I like to cut them in half, so there's more room to pile on the filling. When I shop, I try to find peppers with 4 sides rather than 3, so they'll lay flat. You can use any mixtures of cooked vegetables, such as mushrooms, onions, carrots, etc., with or without quinoa, and with or without ...


11

About ten years ago, I learned the following, specifically about Dunkin Donuts (DD), from Rabbi Gershon Segal, a local rabbi who does local supervision, including of local DD branches, on behalf of local and national kashrut agencies. This is from my memory of what he said verbally back then, so contemporary reality in various locations may vary. However, I ...


11

I sent this question a couple of years ago to the OU. They sent me back: Thank you for contacting the OU. This has differing opinions among poskim. Some view it as yotzai min ha'tamei because the non-kosher animal digests the bean and this improves it. Others view it as pirsha b'alma [waste matter whose Importance has become Nullified] and permit ...


11

The Bracha Al Haadama is cited in tosfot Brachot in name of the machzor of Rabenu Tam (an annotation written by Rabbenu tam in his Machzor), Tosfot said also that Rabenu Tam further reversed his position. The bracha was a birkat Me'en shalosh (as al hamichia or al haets or al hagefen for 7 species of fruits for which torah praised the country of Israel) but ...


11

There is a concern that by opening the box, a usable vessel has been completed, which can be a violation of the prohibition of makeh b'patish, one of the 39 forbidden categories of "work" on Shabbath and Yom Tov. From Halachipedia (based on Shemirath Shabbath KeHilchatha 9:10-1): Cardboard boxes closed with gummed paper or tape, papers stuck together, or ...


11

He already said God's name in vain since non-kosher food doesn't warrant a blessing. Eating the food now isn't going to help that. אכל דבר איסור, אף על פי שאינו אסור אלא מדרבנן, אין מזמנין עליו ואין מברכין עליו לא בתחלה ולא בסוף. (שולחן ערוך או"ח סימן קצו:א)‏ If one ate something prohibited, even if it was only prohibited rabbinically, one does not ...


10

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


10

The Gemarah in Chullin 109 writes for everything that is prohibited there is a thing which is kosher and is the same.The gemara brings the שיבוטא which is a kosher fish head which tastes like pig.So from this gemara it is permitted,l.The Chida also permits this based on this gemara.


10

Shach al ha-Torah (to Ex. 16:17) states that the figure of one omer per person was actually averaged out per family. In other words, he says, adults might end up with more than an omer apiece (since one omer wouldn't be enough for them), while the children would get less - but in aggregate, there were as many omerim as members of the family. Ibn Ezra (to Ex....


10

Nitei Gavriel Yom Kippur 16:9 says the Minhag is to eat round Challas dipped in honey. 16:10:15 brings in the name of the Magen Avraham 608:7 to eat fish and fowl. (some eat the Kapara chicken at this meal). In the name of Rabbi Shalom Ber of Lubavitch Zatzal, not to eat salt. Also to eat Kreplach (meat dumplings). 16:14 Not to eat things that increase ...


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