10

It is not quite correct for everyone to be quoting Rav Moshe, as though the permissibility of drinking USFDA milk originated with his responsa on the subject. Rather, most American Jews were drinking what he called chalav hacompanies well before RMF arrived in the US. They had rabbanim who had already ruled it was permissible, such as R' Dov Revel, R' ...


7

The Chayei Adam in 66:14 writes a two sentence Halacha: According to the letter of the letter of the law, one is allowed to have a non-Jew nurse a Jewish child, but if possible, one should avoid allowing a non-Jew nurse a Jewish child since it 'taints the heart'. Similarly, a Jewish woman who needs to eat forbidden foods for health purposes should hire ...


7

I think the question confuses three different status of milk chalav Israel: milk from kosher animals (e.g., cow, sheep) whose milking was supervised by a Jew -- and is kosher according to all opinions chalav stam ("plain milk"): milk from kosher animals whose milking was not supervised by a Jew. R Moshe Feinstein (YD 1:47-49) held that, in countries with ...


7

Yoni is correct, companies ask for kosher certifications for all sorts of reasons. (I know a rabbi who had his phone ringing off the hook from two American sugar companies begging for certification. Neither needed it from the laws of kosher per se, but both were hoping to sell to a confection company that had made a simple blanket rule, "all our suppliers ...


6

Kashrus Agencies are often asked by food and other product companies for certification, even when halachically no certification is required. The companies are told that there is no technical need for certification but many proceed with obtaining certification nonetheless for a variety of reasons: their competition has certification, the belief that the ...


6

Rav Yaakov Kamentesky actually addresses this question in his Emes L'Yaakov on Shulchan Aruch, 115 (p. 308). He writes that the keilim are fine since it is comparable to the case that the Rama brings in YD 64:9, about a certain fat which contained questionable kashrus. The Rama allowed those who were stringent regarding the fat to eat from the utensils of ...


6

Most people who are careful not to rely on Rav Moshe's leniency do so not because they don't hold of it but only because he advised that people of superior spiritual stature avoid relying on it. I conjecture as follows. Other, standard leniencies (e.g., lifgam) very often apply to cases of using equipment, so even such people combine those leniencies with ...


5

The Igros Moshe (YD 2:33) writes that the common custom is to consume pas palter even where pas yisrael is easily available.


5

This exact question--whether the prohibition exists independently of the concern about non-kosher milk--is the subject of a famous dispute between the Peri Chadash (Yoreh Deah 115:6) and the Chatam Sofer (Teshuvot, Yoreh Deah 107). The Peri Chadash, basing himself on an earlier teshuvah of Radvaz (4:75), argues that the Sanhedrin never prohibited ...


4

See here footnote 38, which discusses the OU policy about countries that at least have the regulation, even though they don't have government inspection. (Basically the OU will allow it if they find the company to be in fear of the government). This ends up including China, Poland, Lithuania, and Ukraine. However, I have heard from someone in the Kashrus ...


4

The details of this kind of question are discussed in the Shach Y.D. 119 s.q. 20. The upshot is that no, it is not OK. Only if someone were microwaving food for a group and a person happens to partake, would there be a reason to be lenient (there are still other factors involved, but that is where the heter starts - you can't just use it yourself because ...


4

I feel the need to post this because of the widespread misconception on this topic, as evidenced by Daniel's comments above, and the number of agreements to them. It is a major Machlokes Haposkim as to whether or not one may drink "Chalav Stam/Akum" if there is significant reason to believe that the Goy has not added milk of any non-Kosher animals. ...


3

I checked with a manager of a large grocery store in Lakewood and in Brooklyn. Unfortunately none of the Cholov Yisroel companies currently produce such a product. Thus it is not available.


3

Their factory produces both Chalav Stam (non "Chalav Yisrael") and Chalav Yisrael cheese. (You'll see a similar-looking label on a non-Chalav Yisrael brand.) They're advertising that they always kasher the machinery by running 212 F water/steam through it before doing the Chalav Yisrael runs, so even if you view Chalav Stam as completely non-kosher that ...


3

The piece you're quoting says with regards to aseres yemei teshuva. The Shulchan Aruch writes that those are lenient concerning pas paltar year-round should be strict during the Ten Days of Repentance. That's what Rabbi Dovid Feinstein was addressing. There has been a clear halachic preference against pas paltar -- but room for leniency as well -- on the ...


3

I've noticed the same problem quite consistently. Although, I must admit that some brands of Chalav stam milk have the same problem. I'll relay what I have heard from 3 store owners in the NY area. All of them said that for some reason, many of the Chalav Yisra'el companies do not sufficiently refrigerate their milk. 2 of the 3 owners told me that sometimes ...


3

The Rama writes (in Yoreh Deah 115:1): חָלָב שֶׁל עוֹבְדֵי כּוֹכָבִים אוֹסְרִים כֵּלִים שֶׁנִּתְבַּשְּׁלוּ בָּהֶם כִּשְׁאָר אִסּוּר, אַף עַל פִּי שֶׁאֵינוֹ רַק סָפֵק שֶׁמָּא עֵרֵב בָּהּ דָּבָר טָמֵא. Milk of a non-Jew makes vessels non-kosher when they are cooked in them, just as any prohibited food, even though this is only an uncertainty whether he has ...


3

I checked a few shopping sites. It seems that for some reason, all the U.S.-based on-line shopping sites sell the Hebrew packaged bag. That one clearly says that it is Chalav Yisra'el. This site shows the Hebrew text package, says the product is Chalav Yisra'el, and says that the text on the package may be in English. I assume that ENglish text doesn't ...


3

I do not think every question requires an answer. however this author obviously did not pay attention to Harav Moshe Zatzal's reasoning. The simple reason why HaRav Moshe allowed this was due to the severe financial penalties a company would incur if they lied and passed off something else as cows milk.


3

If it is because of keeping it as a chumra (as do many in the United States) then one can even use the milchik utensils and pots used for Chalav Stam as long as they are clean. This is from the psak of a rav with Yoreh Yoreh semicha who keeps Chalav Yisroel and Bais Yosef shechitah as a chumra but eats in my house with no problem (I do not keep either).


3

Rambam Hilchos Machalos Asuros 3:12-13 חלב בהמה טמאה, אינו נקפה ועומד כחלב הטהורה; ואם נתערב חלב טהורה בחלב טמאה--כשתעמיד אותו--יעמוד חלב הטהורה, וייצא חלב הטמאה עם הקוס של גבינה. ומפני זה ייתן הדין שכל חלב הנמצא ביד גוי אסור, שמא עירב בו חלב בהמה טמאה; וגבינת הגויים מותרת, שאין חלב בהמה טמאה מתגבן. אבל בימי חכמי משנה גזרו על גבינת הגויים, ואסרוה מפני ...


2

I listened to this shiur and a questioner (about half way through) asks almost exactly the same question (without referencing or meaning מענה לאגרות, and directly from the Mechaber). To explain the answer, basically Rav Reisman explains two points. 1) R. Moshe holds, not like the Pri Chodosh and others, that Cholov Yisroel is a Takkanah and the estimation ...


2

According to Hirhurim, quoting the OU (http://torahmusings.com/2010/12/update-on-cholov-stam/) the milk itself is tested before it can be packaged and marketed. "Even one pail of milk from other species intermingled in a silo sample of cow milk would show up in the results and indicate that the milk is not pure cow milk." Additionally, milk in each ...


2

How can anyone quote R' Moshe without looking at all of his Teshuvos (Igros Moshe YD 1:47-49, 2:31, 35, YD4:5) - and placing them into context?! He wrote a few Teshuvos a few years after each other, where he very clearly demonstrated that as Chalav Yisrael became more prevalent, the 'hetter for Chalav Stam' became less relevant, and more for extenuating ...


2

Rav Moshe's psak on "Chalav HaCompanies" is restricted to the U.S. and Canada because of the strictness of the FDA inspections and the laws and procedures involving the farms and the dairy processors. It has nothing to do with "common assumptions" as we see in European countries where such milk is not allowed. Rav Moshe Feinstein’s Heter of Cholov Stam ...


2

I think he means something different. This is not an unfounded assumption in the eyes of the populace. His point probably is to say everyone knows it's cows milk, because that is what is normally used. This is an understanding between the retailer and the consumer based on practice. If anyone would deviate, expectations would not be fulfilled which would ...


2

There are two views about how to Kasher in the method of כבולעו כך פולטו - the way the non Kosher goes in is the way it comes out. One is to require only slightly above the temperature of the non-Kosher. The other is to require, in the case of hot water, full boiling (212 degrees Fahrenheit) and not relying on any assumptions about the temperature. The ...


2

The Jewish Press explains: The Gemara rules that a Jewish baby may nurse from a non-Jewish woman. It also rules (Yevamos 114a) that a Jewish baby may nurse from a non-kosher animal. As a result, Rabbeinu Chananel states that this is a case of Pikuach Nefesh. That is that a baby is always considered in a state of pikuach nefesh and would thus be allowed to ...


2

Shakh to Yoreh Deah 115:20 quotes a number of opinions (notably Mordechai and Maharam MiRottenburg) which forbid gevinat akum even where a Jew watched the whole process from the start of the milking. So in such a case the milk would be considered chalav yisrael, but nevertheless the fact that a non-Jew was the one to make cheese from it means that the ...


2

In order to be kosher for Passover, a product must be prepared with ingredients that are kosher for Passover, on equipment that is kosher for Passover. A cheese that is kosher for Passover will have Kosher supervision during the process to ensure that all ingredients and equipment is Passover certified. In order for milk to be Cholov Yisroel, a Jew must be ...


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