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39

The Mishna Brura OC 549 sk 3 says to continue fasting if you accidentally ate. In OC 568 sk 3 he says you can still say Aneinu at Mincha if it is a public fast day (as opposed to a personal one). In OC 568 sk 8 he says that you do not need to fast again on a different day for accidental eating on the public fasts as well as any personal fast that has a ...


14

Maseches Derech Eretz Zuta Ch. 5 states: "One who is a Talmid Chacham (Torah scholar) should not eat while standing." From the context it is evident that this behavior is considered unrefined. Apparently there would not be anything halachically wrong for a non-scholar to eat while standing, though it's quite understandable why one would want to avoid it. ...


14

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 40:8) rules that אכילת עראי temporary eating is permitted while wearing Tefillin. Drinking water would seem to fall in this category.


14

Human blood is not included in the prohibition (Shulchan Arukh YD 66:10). There is a concern when consuming any permitted blood that no one think you are consuming forbidden blood. A classic solution to this is including fish scales in a cup of fish blood (ibid. :9). It seems to me that a transfusion bag serves this purpose sufficiently. Even were one to ...


12

Alshich (to 5:5-8) says that indeed she didn't eat at the first feast. Among many other things, this explains why the first one is just described as "the party which Esther made" (5:5), while to the second one Achashverosh and Haman came "to drink with Queen Esther" (7:1).


11

The Mishnah Berurah (231, S"K 5) writes: וראיתי לאנשי מעשה שקודם אכילה היו אומרים הנני רוצה לאכול ולשתות כדי שאהיה בריא וחזק לעבודת הש"י.‏ And I have seen accomplished men who, prior to eating, would say, "I hereby desire to eat and to drink so that I will be healthy and strong for the service of HaShem, Blessed Be He."


11

While the Kol Bo (Siman 24) writes that such a small amount would not need a Beracha Rishona, and Rabbeinu Yonah (Brachot 27Rb) writes that for such small amounts every food gets the Beracha Rishona of "SheHaKol", the vast majority of Rishonim and all Acharonim rule that even the smallest amount ("כל שהוא") of food needs its regular Beracha Rishona and there ...


10

You can eat in a sukkah standing up (as regards the lawa of sukkot). The word 'sitting' is used to imply a sort of permanence of dwelling, but if one eats in a sukkah while standing he certainly says a bracha and fulfils his mitzva. (See Aruch Hashulchan OC 643:3)


10

The Talmud (Sotah 18a) records the following question: בעי רבא: השקה בסיב, מהו? בשפופרת, מהו? דרך שתיה בכך, או אין דרך שתיה בכך? תיקו.‏ Rava asked: If they had her drink [the waters] through a tube, what is the ruling? through a reed, what is the ruling? Is that the manner of drinking or it is not the manner of drinking? The matter remained ...


9

R. Yitzchak Abadi has told me that it's no problem, at any point in the prayers. There is also no need to make a shehakol if one is drinking the water for the sole purpose of lubricating one's throat. Shehakol is only recited on water when the drinking serves the purpose of quenching one's thirst (see Shulchan Aruch OC 204:7).


9

THe GRA in the first pesukim in Mishlei, says that the place where the yetzer hara attacks a person is in a seudas mitzvah. (where we can easily be led to beleive that doing the wrong thing (overeating) is actually the right thing (kavod hashabos).


9

Here is the closet thing I found: Rabbi Chaim Rubin wrote a excellent article about dieting on Shabbos and mentions that there is a tradition "from Sefarim and Sofrim" that Shabbos food does not make one fat. Although he implies there are many sources he only brings one (since it's not the main point of his article) and even that is a Maaseh Rav In the ...


8

Some practices I have adopted that have worked well for me include Taanis HaRaavad (towards the bottom) - basically you try to leave over a portion of food at the end of your meal. If you're eating a slice of pizza forgo that last bite. It is harder than it sounds but it trains you to control your ta'avah Eating in a way that symbolically corresponds to ...


8

What obligates something for immersion is that it is a utensil for eating with or preparing food with "כלי סעודה" Anything else has no obligation. See Shulchan Yoreh Deah 120:1, Aruch HaShulchan 120:30. Example. A mohel needs to peel a orange and the only knife he has to use is his mila knife. So while yes it's a metal utensil, and yes it can be used for ...


8

The gemara in Shabbos says (140b) בל תשחית דגופא עדיף Damaging (lit. בל תשחית [lit. destruction]) of one's body is more important [than בל תשחית of food] (translation mine) Seems pretty simple that if overeating is harmful to a person's body (which it is), it should be avoided even at the cost of wasting food.


8

There's a Jewish Diabetes Association - guide for diabetics that puts out a list of the minimum shiurim; normally we say "oh play it safe and eat a larger amount of matza/wine just to be safe", but for those with medical conditions, we can safely follow the opinions that a much smaller measure is required. Obviously, if someone just can't do it, they just ...


8

I've turned the chair sideways (i.e., the chair back is perpendicular to the table), draped a pillow over the back and leaned my hand over the pillow and the back. Don't use a high-back chair for this. A short chair or folding chair will work fine for this purpose. Another easy solution is just lean your elbow on the table. I have seen a number of ravs I ...


7

Mishna B'rura 170:1 bans saying words of Torah while eating a meal, lest food go down the windpipe instead of the esophagus. I see no reason eating anything else would be different from eating a meal but, of course, contact your rabbi for practical guidance rather than relying on what you read on this site. (And in this case, if your rabbi permits it, you ...


7

Rav Yisroel Belsky (zt"l) said that one should lean slightly to the left, with one's elbow on the table, in a very comfortable manner. See the YouTube video for more detail. Here's a screenshot from the full clip: (Click the image for a higher resolution copy)


7

Talmud Tractate Horayos 13b - "Eating something that a mouse (rat) or cat nibbled on, causes one to forget their learning" So, the whole piece is discarded.


6

Mishnah Berurah 550:4 says that one who is ill (choleh she'ein bo sakana, meaning that the illness is severe enough to make one bedridden, or it affects one's entire body) is exempt from fasting, and is actually forbidden to fast.


6

It says in Hayom Yom for Yud Shvat that when Rebbetzin Rivka (who was the wife of the Rebbe Maharash, the fourth Lubavitcher Rebbe) was eighteenth she felt ill. The doctors told her that she must eat breakfast. She didn't want to eat before Davening so she started Davening early and afterwards eating breakfast [I assume that means that by her normal wake-up ...


6

The Shulchan Aruch (OC 89:5) discusses what to do if you were eating before dawn (alot hashachar; the earliest time for Shacharit), and then dawn happened (and now you are obligated in Shacharit): must you stop eating or not. It seems from here that you are allowed to eat so long as dawn has not happened. The Mishna Berura there notes that if the eating is ...


6

The Gemora in Pesachim (108a) gives two reasons why one should lean specifically to the left: Since he needs to eat with his right hand, leaning in that direction would interfere with his eating. It is considered dangerous to lean to the right because it might cause him to choke.


6

Yes, he makes one. Source: The Halachos of Brochos, by Rabbi Yisroel Pinchos Bodner, (self-published, distributed by Feldheim, 1989, second printing, March 1990), chapter 15, section C.2, citing Magen Avraham 172:2 and Mishna B'rura :3. (The Machatzis Hashekel there notes that this is obvious.)


6

Continue the fast. ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​


6

Coffee and tea is allowed for people in places where it is commonly consumed and especially if they can't concentrate without them. Mishna Berurah siman 89 #22. Milk and sweeteners is dealt with there as well. The Mishna Berurah in the name of Achronim says they should not be used but mentions the minhag is to use them and constructs an interesting premise ...


6

The poskim don't differentiate between liquids and solids. As user6591 pointed out, only foods considered as luxuries or to be haughty are forbidden. Dose of Halacha brings sources and explains: The Gemara (Berachos 10a) writes that one mustn’t eat before davening as it is considered haughty to take care of one’s personal needs first. While most Poskim (...


6

The simplest thing that I have done in this situation is to pull over a folding chair, and set it perpendicular to the left of my chair. Then I use the back of that chair as my armrest. If you have space for it, this is probably your best option. As a backup, I once turned to my right, so that the table was on my left, and then used the table to lean on. ...


6

Rabbi Yitzchak Twersky from the OU says that play-doh does not have to be sold. Cosmetics, lotions and inedible items such as non-chewable pills and Play-Doh need not be sold CRC-Chicago recording 1 & CRC-Chicago recording 2 by Rabbi Dovid Cohen says that play-doh is not rauy l’achilas kelev based on people who tasted it. It includes copious ...


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