Hot answers tagged

24

the question is more cultural than religious. The notion of mayo and white bread plays to the stereotype of the WASPish cuisine as opposed to the traditional eastern-european influenced foods which would have one expect traditional deli fare of pastrami on rye with mustard and maybe a pickle. the issue of dietary law is not at play here.


18

The article says that the this meat is created using stem cells from slaughtered animals: Using stem cells harvested from leftover animal material from slaughterhouses, Post nurtures them with a feed concocted of sugars, amino acids, lipids, minerals and all other nutrients they need to grow in the right way. When it comes to nullifying something ...


18

The Rambam writes (Hilchos Machalos Asuros 2:3): האדם--אף על פי שנאמר בו "ויהי האדם, לנפש חיה" (בראשית ב,ז), אינו בכלל מיני חיה בעלת פרסה; לפיכך אינו בלא תעשה. והאוכל מבשר האדם או מחלבו, בין מן החי בין מן המת--אינו לוקה. אבל אסור הוא בעשה, שהרי מנה הכתוב שבעת מיני חיה ואמר בהן "זאת החיה אשר תאכלו" (ויקרא יא,ב)--הא כל שהוא חוץ מהן, לא תאכלו; ולאו ...


15

Most of the other answers seem to be working under the assumption that the OP is basing the question on the prohibition against consuming blood (although this motivation is not stated in the question). Taking the question at its face value, however, the OP just wants to know how well meat needs to be cooked in order to be Kosher. As YDK's answer suggests (...


15

http://www.kashrut.com/articles/ninedays/ On Shabbos there is no restriction against eating meat or drinking wine even if one began Shabbos early - any time after plag ha-Minchah.


15

To get Kosher meat takes three main steps: choosing the right animal, killing it in the proper way, and removing non-kosher parts from it. (This is all an oversimplification, of course.) Choosing the right animal Kosher land mammals are those who chew their cud and have split hooves. Kosher birds are those that aren't one of the ones listed as not kosher ...


14

No. A kosher animal must be specifically slaughtered and prepared according to Jewish laws in order for its meat to be kosher. These laws are very specific, governing the knife used, the method and stroke of the knife, the method for soaking/salting properly, and checking the innards for defects which would render the animal unkosher. If any of these laws ...


14

No. In theory (see Yore Dea chapters 3, 6, 7), it's possible to kill an animal with a really sharp arrow or thrown knife and render it kosher, but not practically.


13

No. Pigs are singled out by the Torah (Leviticus 11:7) as one of the unkosher animals that have a single kosher sign (they have split hooves but don't chew their cud), and as such, are Biblically prohibited. A Biblical prohibition cannot be overturned (Rambam's Laws of Foundations of the Torah 9:1). (According to some,) the kashrut laws were not instated ...


13

Any Jew, not necessarily a kohen or levi, can slaughter an animal, with few exceptions (Chullin 1:1): הַכֹּל שׁוֹחֲטִין וּשְׁחִיטָתָן כְּשֵׁרָה, חוּץ מֵחֵרֵשׁ, שׁוֹטֶה, וְקָטָן, שֶׁמָּא יְקַלְקְלוּ בִשְׁחִיטָתָן Anyone [may] slaughter - and his slaughter is valid - except for a deaf-mute, a shoteh [a person who exhibits signs demonstrating a lack of ...


12

Here is an answer from The Star-K. Similarly fish gelatin in order to be considered kosher must be produced from kosher species of fish. The use of fish gelatin with meat foods poses an interesting question. As we have mentioned the Shulchan Aruch (Yore Deah:116) prohibits cooking meat and fish together because of health concerns. When dealing with ...


11

Who said that raw meat is inedible? The Shulchan Aruch rules in Hilchot Shabbat that raw meat is not Muktzeh on Shabbat since there are people who eat it as a delicacy (ie Steak Tartar).


11

http://www.youngisrael.org/content/PDFs/Halacha_Central/Halochoscope/hs14-10a.pdf A thermometer is used for a different type of measurement. The operative term is tikun ochel, accomplishing some positive change in the food. A utensil used to measure ingredients or portions performs such a function. A thermometer is used to decide whether the food ...


11

There is an Agadic opinion brought in Or Hachaim in parshas Shmini 11:7 that after the arrival of Moshiach, the pig will begin to chew its cud, and will at that point be Kosher.* Until that day, the Torah clearly gave two signs which we base our dietary laws upon which cannot be ignored. Whether or not Rabbis throughout the ages have tried to make keeping ...


10

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


10

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


10

See OU.org that broiling is an alternative method for Koshering meat. The Torah forbids the consumption of the blood of an animal. The two accepted methods of extracting blood from meat, a process referred to as “koshering”, are either salting or broiling.


10

First of all, meat can be eaten raw (unsalted, unroasted, un-anything, straight from the carcass) after just rinsing it (YD 67:2). Regarding salting, a non-trivial number of rabbinic authorities (even current ones) have allowed using sugar to 'salt' meat when salt was not an option (for availability or medical reasons). See this article for a sampling of ...


9

Although the Torah says not to cook "in the milk of the mother", this is a common example, since the mother's milk is at hand. In actuality any meat is forbidden with any milk. (Tur Yore De'a 87, Shulchan Aruch YD 87:2)


9

Here's a clear explanation of the Heter side: The Arugot Habosem (Rabbi Aryeh Lebush Bolchiver, author of Shem Aryeh, Russia, published 1870; kuntras ha'tshuvot in the back, siman 16) very neatly presents the quandary: Birds require a tradition to be kosher and turkey (indik) is a bird that comes from America, a place that was not discovered until the ...


9

See this article in Hebrew for more detail. The overall concept is based on Chulin 37b: (יחזקאל ד) ואומר אהה ה' אלהים הנה נפשי לא מטומאה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי ועד עתה ולא בא בפי בשר פגול הנה נפשי לא מטומאה שלא הרהרתי ביום לבא לידי טומאה בלילה ונבלה וטרפה לא אכלתי מנעורי שלא אכלתי בשר כוס כוס מעולם ולא בא בפי בשר פגול שלא אכלתי מבהמה שהורה בה חכם ...


9

No, pigs will not be kosher food, not even when pigs learn to fly -- well, at least not until the Messiah comes or science finds a way to change the pig from a pig into something else a bit different. The Torah prohibits animals that can be eaten based on physical characteristics. Leviticus 11:1-32. A kosher animal among mammals must have a cloven hoof ...


8

The koshering process as done today is fairly straightforward: Half-hour soak in water, then rinse. Apply "kosher" salt all over (internal cavities too), then leave it there for an hour. Triple rinse. So yes, it is likely the finished product will be saltier than meat that was never treated with salt. (As I heard it, there was a sad case recently of non-...


8

According to here, Okapi is indeed kosher but is not the Zemer. According to here: The zemer, listed among the ten types of kosher animals in Deuteronomy (14:5), is identified as the giraffe by Rav Saadia Gaon, Rabbenu Yona, Radak, the Septuagint, and many others. According to here, land animals without a tradition of their kashrut cannot be ruled as ...


8

We do have a masorah on turkey. That is: Bechorot 7a declares that kosher and non-kosher species cannot cross-breed. Thus, if two species can hybridize, and one is known to be kosher it is proof positive that the other is kosher as well. This is cited (Rambam, Ma'achalot Assurot 1:13) as an halachikally valid means of distinguishing between kosher and non-...


8

The Rambam explicitly forbids this (MT Hilchot Ma'achalot Assurot 6:11-12) When meat is salted, it should be salted only in a perforated utensil, using only salt that is as heavy as coarse sand, since the salt that is as fine as flour becomes absorbed in the meat and fails to extract the blood. Also, one must shake off the salt before rinsing the ...


7

There is a fundamental difference between eggs and caviar. Chicken eggs come in a totally separate shell - however caviar does not come in a seperate shell therefore it is still considered fish. Although I do not have a source - the reason there is no source is that it must be clear that fish eggs are considered as fish. A small proof to this is on Rosh ...


7

Shepherds move herds. They help raise animals (which provide milk and wool, especially the sheep). There is nothing in the job description of a shepherd that requires killing animals.


7

The Talmud addresses this issue in Bava Kamma 41a: ת"ר ממשמע שנאמר (שמות כא, כח) סקל יסקל השור איני יודע שנבילה היא ונבילה אסורה באכילה מה ת"ל לא יאכל את בשרו מגיד לך הכתוב שאם שחטו לאחר שנגמר דינו אסור באכילה From the fact that it says "the bull shall be stoned" do I not know that it is neveilah (unslaughtered), and neveilah is forbidden to eat? So ...


7

The Birkei Yosef 551/6 brings those that permit it to be eaten. However, the Magen Avraham 551/26, Prei Megadim 551/26, Derech Hachaim 9, Mishneh Berurah 551/56 and the Aruch Hashulchan 551/24, write that it may not be eaten. I don't know about the minhag of the Sefradim.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible