14

In Isur Veheter there is a concept: "Ain Taam Yotzei Mchaticha Lchaticha blo Rotev". Taste can't transfer without liquid. So if a slice of bread absorbed meat taste (so there is no actual meat in the bread, just taste), then one puts that (hot) bread on (hot) cheese, the taste cannot go from the bread into the cheese. Another example of this idea is "Shtei ...


14

We never claimed that the recipe originated from the Terumas Hadeshen; that was the article author's own conclusion. What we said in the book was, "As early as the fifteenth century, it is recorded that every Friday evening the Austrian sage Rabbi Israel ben Petahiah Isserlein (1390-1460) welcomed Shabbes with “three fine hallot kneaded with eggs oil, and a ...


11

Shulchan Aruch, YD 87:3: אינו נוהג אלא בבשר בהמה טהורה בחלב בהמה טהורה אבל בשר טהורה בחלב טמאה או בשר טמאה בחלב טהורה מותרים בבישול ובהנאה "[The prohibition] is only relevant with regards to meat from a kosher animal in milk from a kosher animal, but with regards to meat from a kosher animal in milk from a non-kosher animal or meat from a non-kosher ...


11

http://www.youngisrael.org/content/PDFs/Halacha_Central/Halochoscope/hs14-10a.pdf A thermometer is used for a different type of measurement. The operative term is tikun ochel, accomplishing some positive change in the food. A utensil used to measure ingredients or portions performs such a function. A thermometer is used to decide whether the food ...


11

The Sefer Yerushas Pleita (Siman 16) brings from a sefer called Matta Yerushalayim that quotes in the name of the Chasam Sofer that it was common for people to set up a fire on Erev Shabbos in a way that would burn along a path until shabbos morning where it would reach the stove that had a coffee pot sitting on top and it would cook it. Based off this the ...


11

This does not include the time in the oven, but the notion that the entire process until the dough goes into the oven must be completed within 18 minutes is based on actual opinions on the books. I found the sources cited below and got help in understanding and contextualizing them via the following contemporary English digests: R' Eliezer Melamed, Peninei ...


10

I have heard, I believe from Rabbi Daniel Stein, that Rav Soloveitchk is quoted as crafting the following logic: Chicken soup, unlike water, does not as a practical reality lose its cooking (azil lei bishulei) when cooled. If I have water, boil it, and let it cool, it is basically back to where I started. If I cook soup, and let it cool, I have cold soup,...


10

As per note from MDjava on 11/21/2018 Rabbi Reiss has now decided that it may only be used in a Kli Shlishi. Some have ruled that it is permitted to use this product on Shabbos, but after carefully considering the issues, Rav Reiss has ruled that it should only be used using a kli shlishi. Original Answer: Per the cRc Chicago: Starbucks Via ...


10

From a Kosher Spirit interview with Rabbi Chaim Cohn: KS: Can you share a unique experience that you had while working at the OK? RCC: I once had an argument with a plant engineer concerning whether or not stainless steel can absorb or not. He maintained and brought extensive documentation to prove that stainless steel can’t absorb anything ...


10

Rabbi Dov Lior of Kiryat Arba made a ruling "in principle" saying that modern stainless steel cookware does not absorb flavor at a halachiclly significant level. Apparently two Avrachim from the Torat HaChaim yeshiva tested the amount of absorption of stainless steel and found it to be one part in 170,000 of the volume of the fluid cooked in the pot. In ...


10

In a footnote in this document it states, Iggerot Moshe, Orach Chaim 4:60. Rabbi Feinstein writes that use of timers to automatically regulate machines to perform work forbidden to Jews on Shabbat is generally forbidden, with the exception of turning lights on and off. He believes that use of timers would severely disrupt the Shabbat atmosphere, ...


10

Rasash Pesachim 53a writes that if a community's custom is not to eat roasted meat on the evening of 15 Iyar for the same reason it is not eaten on the night of Pesach, then they should not eat it. He writes that even in a community which doesn't have this custom, eating a full roasted lamb in the manner of the Korban Pesach would remain prohibited as that ...


9

According to the Star-K Tevila Guidelines, no tevila is required for a meat thermometer.


9

A Drizzle of Honey is a collection of recipes redacted (by modern scholars) from expulsion-era Spain based on, of all things, inquisition testimony. All redaction from just ingredients lists is speculative, but these ring true based on other renaissance cooking research I've seen. I've made several of the recipes in this book with generally-good results; ...


9

From my experience as a kosher Chef. This is quite an endeavour but not impossible. One lambs head will not provide much meat but enough for all to taste. Here is one with usage of Moroccan spices/ Sephardic flavours which go nicely with lamb and garnished with glazed apples appropriate for the holiday. For the head; 1 whole lambs head brain removed.( note ...


8

שולחן ערוך יורה דעה הלכות תערובות סימן קיג:טז ‏כלים שבשל בהם העובד כוכבים לפנינו דברים שיש בהם משום בישולי עובדי כוכבים, צריכים הכשר. ויש אומרים שאינם צריכים. ואף לדברי המצריכים הכשר, אם הוא כלי חרס מגעילו שלש פעמים, ודיו, מפני שאין לאיסור זה עיקר מדאורייתא.‏ My rough translation: Dishes that a non-Jew cooked food with (in our ...


8

Short answer: If a Jew cooked the food, then yes, it may be eaten. If a non-Jew cooked the food it's a debate amongst the Poskim. Sources: The Kitzur Shulchan in 92:9 סימן צב - דין חולה שיש בו סכנה ודין אנוס לעברה. addresses this: סעיף ט': הַמְבַשֵּׁל בְּשַׁבָּת בִּשְׁבִיל חוֹלֶה, אָסוּר לְבָרִיא לְאָכְלוֹ בַשַׁבָּת, אֲבָל לְמוֹצָאֵי שַׁבָּת מֻתָּר ...


7

The reasoning is the same and stated in S.A. O.C 253:5- it isn't the normal way of cooking. Solid foods that have been cooked or baked are no longer subject to its respective melacha of bishul (ain bishul achar bishul). Placing the item on the stove from, say, the fridge is at best rabinically forbidden because it appears to others like you are cooking (...


7

The Torah uses two different terms for "work," מלאכה and עבודה. In the case of Shabbos, the Torah consistently says that no מלאכה may be done on it (Ex. 20:9, 31:14-15, 35:2; Lev. 23:3; Deut. 5:13). By contrast, with Yom Tov, the Torah states in several places that מלאכת עבודה is prohibited (Lev. 23 passim, Num. 28-29 passim). Ramban (to Lev. 23:7) explains ...


7

See the Aruch HaShulchan YD 87:10 where he says that you cannot bring a proof from the laws of Shabbos to say that frying is a problem of cooking meat and milk. Similarly, by smoking (in #25) he writes the same. In #31 he discusses bishul acher bishul, but seems to conclude that again, despite the rules of Shabbos, the rules of basar b'chalav are different.


7

Rashi in Pesachim 39a says that shaluk is extensively cooked, and Tosafos there 39b agrees. That's pretty much the standard pshat. However, Ran in Nedarim 49a translates it there as undercooked.


7

I've seen on the supermarket shelves Ezekiel Bread, based on the 2600 year old "recipe" given in Yechezkiel 4:9.....without the dung, of course. According to the maker's site's info page, it's extremely healthy. Thanks for the recipe, HaShem! An even older one from the same Chef is Roasted Whole Lamb w/Bitter Herbs and a side of Matzoh, given in Shemot 12....


7

Technically, flavor does not transfer from one utensil to another unless some liquid is present as a conduit. Practically, however, there will usually be spillover that can cause problems. In theory one could use a separate crock with an aluminum liner to catch any spills, but this is not very practical either. Probably the best bet is to buy a dedicated ...


7

The Shulchan Aruch (YD 113:16) quotes two opinions on the matter, but his language (סתם ויש אומרים הלכה כסתם) seems to indicate that he sides the first opinion, namely that the vessels do require kashering. However, he notes that since Bishul Akum is a rabbinic prohibition, we allow you to kasher some things that you normally could not kasher, such as ...


7

http://www.nytimes.com/2006/04/05/dining/05leav.html?pagewanted=all But rabbis in even some of the most Orthodox associations say chometz does not refer to all leavening. "There is nothing wrong about a raised product at Passover per se," said Rabbi Moshe Elefant, executive rabbinic coordinator and chief operating officer of the Orthodox Union'...


7

Per this article at ohr.edu there are 2 possibilities where one may cook meat with milk. One solution (which should only be done with the parents' permission) is that your daughter put the pot on the stove and supervise while one of the children lights the fire; or that she first light the fire and supervise while the child places the pot. By ...


7

No, one should not recite a bracha. The Shulchan Aruch (YD 329:3) rules that thick dough kneaded to be boiled (which is what deep frying is) is exempt from Challah. The Shach notes that some opinions don't care what his intentions are when kneading, and if it is a thick bread-like dough it is obligated in Challah from the time of kneading. The Pitchei ...


7

I go to college and lived with a gentile roommate last semester, and I wish I had someone as considerate; but, let's get started. Obviously make sure to be considerate on Shabbat by leaving the bathroom light on and avoiding any sort of problem that must be solved by breaking one of the Shabbat rules. For example, don't leave something of importance that she ...


7

Let's assume the people eating it are all non-Jews. At that point the only problems (that I can think of) are: cooking meat and milk together, and benefiting from meat-and-milk-cooked-together. If you're just doing the dessert, cleanup, or setup, I can't see that as tangible benefit from the main course. (Feeding it to your dog when you would otherwise ...


7

In Rabbi Eider's Halachos of Shabbos page 322 footnote 657, he quotes a list of Rabbis who say this is assur. In order of his quoting them: Rav Y. Henkin in Euros Yisroel page 122. Tzitz Eliezer chelek 2 siman 6 & 7. Chelek three siman 18. Chelek 7 siman 16. Minchas Yitzchok chelek 4 siman 26. He mentions as well that according to some opinions ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible