17

Yes. The Jerusalem Talmud (Tractate Megillah) quotes Rav Imi telling his assistant that if a scholar should visit and need to sleep in the Synagogue, he should let him, and allow him to bring his donkey and other objects in as well. This opinion is codified in the Ran in Tractate Megillah. Rav Moshe Feinstein in his Responsa writes, ...


8

Peri Megadim (OC 140 MZ 2) writes that perhaps if the mute is an extremely important person ("אדם חשוב גדול הדור") we can be lenient to allow others to say the blessing for him through Shomea' KeOneh, but the matter requires further investigation (צ"ע). Keren David (OC 27) takes it as obvious that this wouldn't work, and Shevet HaLevi (7:20:3) is inclined ...


6

The context of that Mishna is discussing who is fit to lead the congregation in prayers, and in particular that line is part of a dispute if a blind person can lead the prayer of Shema and its blessings. (Note "leading" here means reciting the entire section aloud for the congregation to hear and fulfill their obligations by reciting Amen at the end of each ...


5

In writing or in sign language. You are talking about someone that can hear and understand. For the Din of Cheresh (which imply inability to be Chayav bemitsvot) is a man who cannot speaking nor hearing (mishna Terumot 1, 2). A mute is mentioned in mishna Teruma 1, 6, the mishna says that he is not allowed to levying the Teruma, but if he did this, the ...


5

This link from the OU lists Mikvas that are accessible to handicapped people.


4

Rabbi Dovid Stein of Beit Kenesset Chatam in Rehovot has a large group of deaf people come and read Parshas Zachor from the torah every year. Meaning that each individual comes to the torah and reads for himself. Presumably this is because "krias hatorah" needs to be just that - reading from the torah, and sign language is not considered to fit into the ...


4

See Does Down Syndrome make one a Shoteh? . Generally, they are obligated in whatever mitzvot their consciousness can support. If someone's actions indicate they're completely disconnected from reality (hard to define), then they could reach the threshold of a shoteh and be exempted from everything. There are 50 places in Rambam's code where he takes for ...


4

The Jerusalem-based kollel Eretz Hemda has a responsa on this very topic (here). Their conclusion is that If [a person is] permanently (or for a long time) in need of a wheelchair, people should get used to including them in all activities that make them feel included in a normal life, as their personalities demand and halacha allows. They should be ...


4

R Abraham S. Abraham discusses a related element in the volume 1 of his Nishmat Avraham pp. 166ff. - a 3-volume sefer of medical halacha. He explains (based on Shulchan Aruch HaRav) that the assembling of items on Shabbbat is only prohibited if it will definitely not be dismantled on Shabbat (i.e., building a permanent structure). Therefore, according to ...


4

If one is missing his middle finger, he should wrap around the finger closest to the thumb, the index finger. That is the same finger a ring is placed on by marriage, and the wrappings represent our connection to Hashem [as we say "וארשתיך"]. (שו"ת בית ישראל מהאב"ד דעדעלין או"ח סי' ג)


4

You've asked an interesting question. I've seen several Bar Mitzvah affairs done on Shabbat for cerebral palsy kids and those with all kinds of disabilities. I have a close friend who has an autistic son. (IMO, I pray that no one should ever have to deal with this disability. In some ways, it's worse than dealing with a child with cancer.) He is somewhat ...


4

I am a charadi yid living in NYC. I can describe what I did for my severely disabled (non verbal, non mobile, blind) son. [He had a stroke as a result of side effect to a medication at 2.5 years]. On the advice of my rov I cleaned him, put on thphilin so he should not be a Karkafto dalo manach thphlin (see zohar). Also made a seuda/party (that was more of ...


4

The implication of the Mishna (Ma'aser Sheni 4:7) is that a formal declaration is not necessary, and context suffices: היה מדבר עם האשה על עסקי גיטה וקדושיה ונתן לה גיטה וקדושיה ולא פירש רבי יוסי אומר דיו. ‏ This is the halakha as recorded by Rambam (Hilkhot Ishut 3:8) and the Shulhan Arukh (EH 27:1). Accordingly, a mute could get married without ...


4

Quoting the Rambam again, he actually says something more radical. "כְּשֶׁיַּעֲשֶׂה תְּשׁוּבָה וְיָשׁוּב מֵחֶטְאוֹ חַיָּב לְהִתְוַדּוֹת -- ... when he does teshuvah, he is obligated to confess..." The mitzvah is vidui (the confession), teshuvah is the context in which vidui would be said. There is a dispute among acharonim as to whether the Rambam counts ...


4

Tzomet is an Israeli institute for Science and Halacha (Jewish law). They research modern devices and see how they can be used/tuned to be used with observant Jews. They have some relevant thoughts on hearing aids (here) In summary, the main halachic requirements for using a hearing aid are to have appropriate long-lasting batteries and to turn it on before ...


4

Since the simple, traditional reason for covering the eyes is in order not to be distracted [while reciting the Shema (proclaiming God’s kingship)], as stated in SA O.C. 61:5, therefore if one cannot see, due to a visual impairment, and covering the eyes won’t enhance focus there would be no reason to do so.


3

The sefer LeDofkei BaTeshuva by Rabbi Uri Teegar on Rambam's Hilchos Teshuva 1:1, in Biurim s.v. על לשון כל ישראל (near § 65, it's too far to see for free on Otzar HaChochma) brings the Sefer HaChinuch § 364, who explains the reasons for vidui (verbal confession): (1) expressing one's sins reveals one's thoughts and beliefs, such that it's clear they don't ...


3

Welcome to Mi Yodeya. As my son wears cochlear implants, I have been reading quite a bit on the usage of hearing aids and implants on Shabbat. There is quite a diversity of opinions in this area. However, Rabbi Elisha Sandler's article is about the most comprehensive that I can find on the web. I know Rabbi Sandler, so if you have any specifics that you ...


3

The Halacha clearly defines when a potential Ger - who wants to keep all the Mitzvot - should be turned away. These reasons are codified in Shulchan Aruch, Yoreh De'ah סימן רסח - כיצד מגירין הגר והגירת, ודיני קדשת הגר יב: כְּשֶׁבָּא הַגֵּר לְהִתְגַּיֵּר, בּוֹדְקִים אַחֲרָיו שֶׁמָּא בִּגְלַל מָמוֹן שֶׁיִּטֹּל אוֹ בִּשְׁבִיל (טז) שְׂרָרָה שֶׁיִּזְכֶּה לָהּ ...


3

The חכמת אדם in סימן קיט:יח says that fake teeth or fillings are חוצץ. R' Moshe Feinstien in אגרות משה יורה דעה א׳ צז:ו argues, and says that certainly permanent fillings are not חוצץ and suggests that even removable fillings aren'y חוצץ if they are in בית סתרים. If so, we may extrapolate to other prosthetics. Certainly if they are permanent they should ...


2

See Siman 55 in Biur Halacha: http://www.hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14170&st=&pgnum=172&hilite= Summary: Taz isn't too fond of the idea of having a deaf Shaliach Tzibbur. If he is davening, however, according to Magen Avraham, Gra, Bach and others, it appears we should not remove him from the amud. Rabbi Akiva Eiger concludes that l'...


2

What you say is similar - somewhat - to what the Ralbag explains there. He says it refers to the covenant that Abraham made with Abimelech not to fight with each other: The blind refers to Isaac who- towards the end of his life - lost his sight. The lame refers to Jacob who - after the fight with the angel - limped for a while. וַיֵּלֶךְ הַמֶּלֶךְ ...


2

This link from the OU lists synagogues that are handicapped accessible.


2

What you're describing sounds like the halachos category known as a "shoteh," a mentally disabled person, who, as you correctly assumed, is not obligated in mitzvos. At first glance, you might point out that one still gains reward for doing mitzvos in which he or she is not obligated in, albeit less than that which a sane person gets (Kiddushin 31). ...


2

I did some googling and found some interesting results. The one with the most information is here. It is a reasonably long essay on deafness in halakhah, and outlines differing opinions on different topics. Short version: Some say deaf people who can speak or hear through a hearing aid are obligated to read the Torah, but the Megilla has a particular ...


2

I don't have the sources, but I was told that the commentators say that someone for whom the physical appearance doesn't matter, may marry without seeing the woman. This was stated regarding someone on an exceptionally high spiritual level, but I don't see why it wouldn't apply to someone physiologically prevented from caring about looks. (Maybe there should ...


2

I found the following here from the Yalkut Yosef authored by Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef sefardi Chief Rabbi of Israel. ד נוהגים ליתן יד ימין על העינים בקריאת פסוק שמע ישראל, כדי שלא יסתכל בדבר אחר שימנע ממנו לכוין. וגם איטר יד יניח יד ימין על עיניו בקריאת שמע. ואין צריך להסיר המשקפיים בעת שנותן ידיו על עיניו בקריאת שמע. וגם סומא בשני עיניו יניח יד ימינו ...


2

I've been making soft matzah for about 5 years and I can offer the following insights based on that experience. The halacha from last week indicated that while forming the dough, the baker must look for certain signs, "These signs include; cracks forming on the dough or the color of the dough’s surface turning white" and they indicate that the dough ...


1

Rema in OC 27:1 rules that one who is missing his hand but has a remaining arm lays tefillin without a blessing, citing a machlokes between Tosafos in Menachos (37a) and the Ohr Zarua. Mishne Berura rules that one who is missing his left arm entirely - or even one is is missing the majority of his upper arm - is exempt from laying the shel yad at all, but ...


1

The Mishnah (Kiddushin 2a) gives three ways to get married: money, document, or marital relations. So if he can't give the ring, he can always give the document. One merely has to write in the document הרי את מקודשת לי - it need not be said (ibid. 9a), unlike by the money (ibid. 6b).


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