24

Someone asked this of Rabbi Yaakov Hopfer, a major posek on these matters in Baltimore. He said without hesitation that it was permissible. His interpretation of the prohibition on "s'chok vekalut rosh" is "behavior that is suggestive or disinhibiting." I don't see a normal "I love you" as either of those.


12

A person whose wife is nidah is still obligated to love her as much as he loves himself; anything he says in order to "lessen the tension in the air" is permitted (Nit'ei Gavriel 33:4 and footnote 8). So I guess to say "I love you" to "lessen the tension in the air" is permitted, but to say it for no reason may be closer to lightheadedness.


11

Even according to the custom of avoiding interrupting between washing and the blessing of HaMotzi, one need not wash again if one spoke or otherwise interrupted as long as the person remained mindful to keep their hands clean during the interim (Mishna B'rura 166:6, English translation): דע דעיקר דין תכיפה המוזכר בסימן זה הוא רק מצוה לכתחלה אבל בדיעבד ...


11

Just a suggestion, but one which worked for me -- when I got married I thought to myself, "would it be appropriate for a 1 year old to have his or her first words be curses?" Children imprint on the language they hear around them. So I decided that I was going to keep myself from saying words for the sake of my as of yet unborn children. If I got into the ...


11

The source is Moshe Ibn Ezra (1055-1140, not to be confused with the better known R. Avraham Ibn Ezra), in his sefer Shirat Yisroel. The footnote in the edition linked here1 says that his source was מנאני אלאדב כרך א סימן ל"ג, who quotes עמאר בן עבד אלקיס. In personal correspondence to Isaac Moses, Rabbi Joshua Dachman-Soled, a scholar of Judaism in Islamic ...


10

According to Rebbetzin Faige Luban, a kallah teacher in Edison, NJ, it is required.


10

Yerushalmi Terumoth (ch. 1): ולא יראה בך ערות דבר (דברים כג): ערות דיבור זה - ניבול - פה Also, see Mesilat Yesharim (ch. 11) about the severity of this sin, where he brings this and other sources.


10

Jewish Action, Summer 2005 edition, has a "What's the truth about..." column by Rabbi Dr. Ari Z. Zivotofsky on not meeting for the week preceding the wedding. His main point is the lack of old sources for this custom, but he does cite several newer sources and the reasons they give. See there for the details, but the reasons and post-facto rationales offered ...


10

The Tzemach Tzedek (Lubavitch) wrote, that if we only knew the power of saying Psalms, and the positive spiritual effect they had we would say them constantly! See this video: Hayom Yom Shevat 24. And the text can be found here


9

See Igros Moshe Even Haezer 3:35 where he says it is a mitzvah to speak lashon hakodesh based of Sifri (Devarim Piska 46) which is quoted by Rashi on the verse of l'daber bam (Devarim 11:19). (The tshuvah is focused on non Jewish names.)


9

The 3rd commandment is not to take a pointless oath in G-d's name (e.g. swearing that a table is a table, and other pointless oaths, see ch 1) as is codified by Rambam (Hilchos Shvuos) and Sefer HaChinuch(30). By swearing pointlessly invoking the name of G-d, one trivializes G-d's significance as the singular force in the Universe. Rambam (Hilchos Berachos ...


9

It's pretty hard to ask any questions from the first two chapters of Genesis, considering both the esoteric nature of both the topic and the fact that the world seems to have rather different back then in a way that may be inherently incomprehensible for us now that we've been evicted from Eden. That being said, there are several approaches to this ...


9

The Kitzur Shulchan Aruch in סימן טו - דיני קדיש וברכו וצרוף עשרה says that as long as there are at least 6 people actually answering, you may say Kaddish, as long as there are 10 adult males above Bar Mitzva awake in the room - even if 1, 2, 3 or 4 of them are forbidden from answering kaddish at that moment. סעיף ז': אִם אֵין ט' שׁוֹמְעִין לְהַשְּׁלִיחַ ...


9

While I do not in anyway meant to minimize the difficulty of removing profanity from one's vocabulary (or the effort of those who have been successful), it may be helpful to recall that if you have learned to use profanity you have probably already mastered not using it settings where such language is frowned upon. From my experience I would suggest the ...


8

The Rambam (Hil. Avel, 4:4) presents this custom as halacha, and he is followed by many other rishonim including the Rokeach (Hil. Aveilus, 313), Sefer HaAgudah (B'rachos, Chapter 9), Kol Bo (§ 114), and the Ramban (Toras HaAdam, Sha'ar HaSof, Inyan HaHotza'ah). This custom is also presented by such later authorities as the Beit Yosef (YD 376) and, more ...


8

The Gemara in Bava Metzia (59a), in dealing with the prohibition of causing anguish - Onas Devarim, says that it is imperative to speak to ones wife nicely, for they cry very easily. אמר רב לעולם יהא אדם זהיר באונאת אשתו שמתוך שדמעתה מצויה אונאתה קרובה The Gemara is saying to take into account the levels of sensitivity of each person. The fact that ...


8

See the Chafetz Chaim in Shmiras Halashon (חלק ב' פרק יח): פָּרָשַׁת בְּהַעֲלֹתְךָ ''וַתְּדַבֵּר מִרְיָם וְאַהֲרֹן בְּמֹשֶה עַל אוֹדוֹת'' וְגוֹ' {במדבר י''ב א'}. מִפָּרָשָׁה זוֹ אָנוּ לְמֵדִים כַּמָּה עִנְיָנִים: א. שֶׁאִסּוּרוֹ הוּא אֲפִלּוּ אִם הָאִישׁ שֶׁדִּבֵּר עָלָיו הוּא עָנָו וּשְׁפַל רוּחַ, וְאֵינוֹ מַקפִּיד עַל מַה שֶׁדּוֹבֵר עָלָיו [...


8

Is there an argument against this prohibition? It contradicts an explicit Gemara in Shabbat 40b: "והאמר אביי "דברים של חול מותר לאומרן בלשון קודש, של קודש אסור לאומרן בלשון חול To which Rashi elucidates: דברים של קדש. דברי תורה: אסור לאומרן. במקום הטנופת ואפי' בלשון חול:‏ In an unclean location one may chat in Lashon Hakodesh, whereas one may ...


8

Peri Megadim (OC 140 MZ 2) writes that perhaps if the mute is an extremely important person ("אדם חשוב גדול הדור") we can be lenient to allow others to say the blessing for him through Shomea' KeOneh, but the matter requires further investigation (צ"ע). Keren David (OC 27) takes it as obvious that this wouldn't work, and Shevet HaLevi (7:20:3) is inclined ...


8

R. Moshe Sternbauch addresses this in his Teshuvot V'hanahagot (Vol. IV #73): והנה לכאורה פשוט דתרגום אונקלוס צריך לקרוא בפיו דוקא ולא מספיק בהרהור, ולפ"ז אולי גם כשלומד רש"י לתרגום הדין כן, שיש להוציא בפה לצאת חובת שנים מקרא ואחד תרגום, ולא מצאתי ד"ז בפוסקים, ויש לחלק שרש"י הוה פירוש ומועיל נמי בעל פה, לא כן התרגום הוא כפשוטו, ובמקום מקרא עומד וצריך בפה ...


8

One who blasphemes G-d is executed. Mishne Torah, Avodas Kochavim, 2:7 A Jewish king may execute someone for speaking against him (rebellion against the monarch). Mishneh Torah, Melachim 3:8 One who disrespects a Jewish sage is excommunicated. Mishneh Torah, Talmud Torah 6:11-12 A sage who rules against the ruling of the Sanhedrin is executed. Mishne Torah, ...


8

In Jeremiah 26 there is a conversation involving six different named parties: Jeremiah speaks to the nation, the priests and the prophets The nation, the priests, and the prophets respond The princes of Judah hear and come The priests and the prophets speak to the princes and the nation Jeremiah speaks to the princes and the nation The princes and the ...


7

The Vilna Gaon held (Maaseh Rav 18): ולילך בהם כל היום אפילו משא ומתן מותר ואכילת עראי ג״כ מותר רק דברים בטלים אסור And to go with [the Tefillin] all day, even business matters are permitted, and even non-fixed eating is also permitted, only useless words ["Devarim Beteilim"] are prohibited. It seems like he's saying that regular actions that are ...


7

Here's a shiur talking exactly about your question (haven't listened to it) I would define texting and using social media sites to be basically the same thing. http://www.yutorah.org/lectures/lecture.cfm/782704/Rabbi_Aryeh_Lebowitz/Ten_Minute_Halacha_-_Talking_Texting_and_Eating_in_the_Bathroom (in English). Some sources discussing something similar to your ...


7

See SA OC Siman 84 where it is clear that talking itself is allowed in a bathhouse, the restrictions are only to greeting with the word Sholom and speaking Torah etc.


7

The Chochmas Adam (Issur v'Heter, 89:7) decries the practice of going to a gravesite and unburdening oneself to the deceased by telling them about one's problems.1: איסור דורש אל המתים זה שמרעיב עצמו ולן בבית הקברות כדי שתשרה עליו רוח הטומאה (סימן קע"ט סעיף י"ג) ואותן נשים וכן עמי הארצות שהולכין על קברי מתים וכאילו מדברים עם המתים ואומרים להם צרותיהם קרוב ...


7

The Talmud (Berakhot 42a) states that there are three things done immediately. One of them is: תכף לנטילת ידים ברכה Immediately [after] washing one's hand, blessing. The Tur (OH 166) writes that his father, Rosh, was accustomed (apparently on the basis of this Gemara) to not even speak after netillat yadayim, before hamotsi (besides for not speaking ...


7

Rav Shmuel Vital (17th century) in the siddur חמדת ישראל says this. גם צריך להזהר מאד שלא להזכיר בפיו שם סמא"ל וזהו סוד מש"ה אלהים אחרים לא תזכירו וכו' ובפרט בלילה שאז היא שליטתו וממשלתו.ולא עוד אלא שגם הוא אסור להזכיר מעין דברים אלו כגון בני אדם הרגילים לומר בלשון לע"ז איל דייאבל"ו וכיוצא בדברים אלו אין להזכירם כלל לפי שגם השדי"ם הם בחלקו ומגביר כוחו ...


7

I would start by picking a window of time, maybe 30 min, maybe 15, where you can stay conscious and in control of what I am saying. "From 6 to 6:30 pm, I will not speak nivul peh." After a week, stretch that window. And then extend it again the third week. At some point, instead of taking on more time, move it to a more sensitive part of the day/week, like ...


7

The question is predicated on a joke which you missed or which wasn't properly explained. One of the grandsons of Esav was named Nachas, as we see in Bereishit 36:13: וְאֵלֶּה בְּנֵי רְעוּאֵל, נַחַת וָזֶרַח שַׁמָּה וּמִזָּה; אֵלֶּה הָיוּ, בְּנֵי בָשְׂמַת אֵשֶׁת עֵשָׂו. And these are the sons of Reuel: Nahath, and Zerah, Shammah, and Mizzah. These were the ...


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