14

Rashi to Shmuel Aleph 15:3 explains that the Amalekites were sorcerers and were capable of disguising themselves as animals - and for this reason Shaul was commanded to kill even the animals. In his commentary to Devarim 25:19 he brings another explanation: The eradication of the memory of Amaleik had to be absolute, and even if animals remained alive they ...


13

See the gemara in Yoma 22b. This was orchestrated in order to ensure the longevity of his kingdom. As Rabbi Yoḥanan said in the name of Rabbi Shimon ben Yehotzadak: One appoints a leader over the community only if he has a box full of creeping animals hanging behind him, i.e., he has something inappropriate in his ancestry that preceded him. Why is that? It ...


12

The Chidushei HaGriz (§ 161) comments that the narrative between Shmuel and Shaul is a basis for the Rambam's opinion in 6:4. In verse 18, Sh'mu'el says that Sha'ul was told to destroy אֶת-הַחַטָּאִים אֶת-עֲמָלֵק: And the LORD sent thee on a journey, and said: Go and utterly destroy the sinners the Amalekites, and fight against them until they be consumed....


12

Kli Yakar - Shmuel 2 says he was called Hachiti, either because he was a convert from Chais or he lived amongst the Bnei Chais. Either way he was a Jew.


11

This is a question asked by many commentators, so your wife is in good company :) I'll bring four of the above-mentioned commentators here: Rashi (Samuel 1, 17, 55) (partial) וכי לא היה מכירו והלא כתיב (לעיל טז כא) ויאהבהו מאד ויהי לו נושא כליו אלא ראהו מתנהג בטכסיסי מלכות אמר שאול אם בא ממשפחת פרץ...‏ Saul indeed knew who David was, but since he ...


11

The Gemara in Kesubos 9a asks that question and gives two answers 1) The woman only becomes forbidden (to her husband, and as a consequence also to the adulterer) if she willingly commits adultery. Bas Sheva did not have a choice, so she did not become forbidden. 2) She had a get, so it technically was not adultery.


10

The Gemara in Kiddushin says that he was Jewish - Kiddush 76b: אמר רב יהודה אמר רב כדי שתהא זכותן וזכות אבותם מסייעתן והאיכא (שמואל ב כג, לז) צלק העמוני מאי לאו דאתי מעמון לא דיתיב בעמון והאיכא (שמואל ב כג, לט) אוריה החתי מאי לאו דאתי מחת לא דיתיב בחת (Summary) As a member of Dovid's army, Uriah had impeccable lineage. He was called "Hachiti" ...


10

The Talmud (M'nachos 96a) explains that David and his coterie were in mortal danger of starving at the time, which legally supersedes the prohibition against them eating showbread. Another approach, mentioned by the Radak (ad loc.), is that the loaves were loaves from a korban todah (thanksgiving offering) that a non-priest could consume while in a state ...


9

Amalekites and magic: The Amalekites' ability to change into animals is brought by Rashi on Shmuel 1:15:3 and the Rid on the same verse, and mentioned as a midrash in the Kitzur Ba'al Haturim's commentary on Shemot 22:17. Their ability to use magic to flee from danger is brought in the longer commentary of Ba'al Haturim on Shemot 17:13 as something that &...


9

Rabbi Yechezkel ben Yehuda Landau (known as the Noda Beyehuda) in his work Doresh Letziyon, Derush 5 (new print p.46-47) poses this question. He takes the view that Shmuel Hanavi was allowed to kill Agag because of the principle of 'Aseh docheh lo saaseh'. The mitzva to kill Amalek (particularly, as he was the last living Amalekite at the time,) superseded ...


9

Basically the answer would be the same as an answer to a question how do we distinguish reality from a dream. The realness of a prophecy would be overwhelming. Rabeinu Crescas addresses this question in his book "Ohr Hashem" (Maamar 2, Rule 4, Ch. 3). וזה, שכמו שיש יתרון להרגש החוש על הרגש הדמיון, שבעבורו יודע המרגיש והוא ער, שאיננו מרגיש בדמיון לבד, ...


9

http://vbm-torah.org/archive/shmuel/79shmuel.htm The Radak rejects such an explanation, saying: "He saw from upon the roof that she was bathing in her house." This understanding is reasonable, both because the roof was already mentioned at the beginning of the verse, and because if the words "from the roof" relate to Bat-Sheva's bathing, it should ...


9

The Talmud (Avoda Zara 4b-5a) indeed acknowledges that the sin did not match his character and he was ensnared as a way to teach future generations a lesson about the power of repentance. (Similarly, the Talmud indicates that the sin of the golden calf was also out of character for the nation/generation and was also an entrapment to teach of the power of ...


9

I wrote an essay a couple of years ago that dealt, in part, with these questions. The answer to your first question is: Yes and no. David's military uniform depended on which weapon he was using in battle. David's favored weapon at this stage of his life was the sling (קלע, kelah in Hebrew). Not the rickety little slingshot that some prankster kids may play ...


8

Perhaps you wouldn't know, without someone to educate you. Ramchal, Derech Hashem, 3:4:3: הנה אפשר שיגיע גילוי ממנו ית' אל אדם והוא לא יכיר בו כמו שיכיר הנביא אלא יחשבהו בא מן המורגשות עד שיגבר עליו השפע הנבואיי ואז יכיר הענין כמות שהוא באמת. ומן המין הזה היתה קריאת ה' לשמואל שלא התנבא מתחלה ולא שפע עליו השפע אלא שנגלה עליו קול כקול מורגש ולא השיג בזה ...


8

See Shabbos 13b with Rashi and Sanhedrin 19-20, Palti put a sword in their bed and never came close to her. He is praised more than Yosef and Boaz for his control.


8

Is there anywhere else in Tanach where "kohanim" does NOT mean priests? 1. Shoftim Ch. 17 - 18: In the end of Shoftim the ben-Levi who served in Micha's place of worship is referred to as a Cohen multiple times. E.g.: שופטים פרק-יח ל: וַיָּקִימוּ לָהֶם בְּנֵי דָן אֶת הַפָּסֶל וִיהוֹנָתָן בֶּן גֵּרְשֹׁם בֶּן מְנָשֶה הוּא וּבָנָיו הָיוּ כֹהֲנִים ...


8

David's sin was a personal matter, Saul's was national. King Saul was personally commanded to eradicate Amalek. This was a national interest which was under his authority as king. When he sinned and didn't obey, it was in his position as king, and so God punished him as a king (i.e. by losing his monarchy). King David sinned in something everyone was ...


8

I admit that don't have a source for the following distinction. But there's a logical distinction between the cases. Shmuel was consecrated to Hashem. Chana didn't abandon him, or "lock him up" forever. She gave him to the Mishkan, to be raised by Eli and to develop as a navi. Yiftach, however, locked his daughter away. He didn't send her to become a ...


7

I think the answer to this question lies in how Shmuel chose to rebuke the nation. In chapter 12, Shmuel recaps the mistake that the Jewish people have made in requesting a king. In verse 17, he tells them the following: הֲלוֹא קְצִיר-חִטִּים, הַיּוֹם--אֶקְרָא אֶל-יְהוָה, וְיִתֵּן קֹלוֹת וּמָטָר; וּדְעוּ וּרְאוּ, כִּי-רָעַתְכֶם רַבָּה אֲשֶׁר עֲשִׂיתֶם ...


7

In Shmuel 1 chapter 8 vs 6 Rashi explains that the problem with the request wasthe fact that they said 'to rule over us like all the nations'. The Radak there explains that it was apparent they made their request as a complaint, not that they were looking to be mikayem the mitzvah of appointing a king. See here Why did the people want a king? the first ...


7

Radak says "Ain Somchin al hanes" Do not rely on miracles. He also compares it to Yaakov being afraid that Eisav was coming, David fleeing from Shaul and other incidents In Pesachim 8b and Yoma 11a we are told that the protection during the mission is only if the danger is not imminent. In this case, Shmuel asked for natural means to protect himself ...


7

Sefer Moshav Zekeinim end Parshas Beshalach brings it in the name of a Medrash, however does not indicate where this Medrash is.


7

The commentators (drawing on traditional sources) like Rashi and Metzudos, etc., explain that David put on a linen casual robe used by celebrants that would honor a religious event. He was covering most of his body, but as he danced vigorously, his legs and arms were exposed. It does not mean that he was naked in the "total" sense. The robe was nice, but it ...


7

Both Targums on Esther 2:5 identify The Shimei in Mordecai's lineage with Shimei Ben Gera. They state that David saw through a prophetic experience that Mordecai (and Esther according to the first Targum) descended from Shimei, so he delayed his revenge until Shimei stopped bearing children to allow for the subsequent salvation of the Jewish people in the ...


7

Kiddushin 43a: האומר לשלוחו צא הרוג את הנפש הוא חייב ושולחיו פטור שמאי הזקן אומר משום חגי הנביא שולחיו חייב שנא' (שמואל ב יב, ט) אותו הרגת בחרב בני עמון One who says to his agent: "Go and kill someone" - he is liable, but his sender is not. Shamai the Elder said in the name of Chagai the prophet that his sender is liable, as it says (Shmuel 2:12:9),...


7

The Radak makes your point in Divrei Hayamim to suggest that the Amonim are a different nation than the B'nei Amonim. In the story in Shmuel, they are referred to as Amonim throughout, not B'nei Amon, so they could be that second nation.


7

Abarbanel discusses this issue in his introduction to Sefer Yehoshua and concludes (my translation): "And it seems that when Yirmiyahu wished to write Sefer Melachim, he clarified Sefer Shmuel that came before, and he collected the prophecies that were written in that book, and without a doubt he added things to it [Sefer Shmuel] to clarify, according ...


6

The people wanted a king so that they could more closely resemble the other nations (Sh'muel I, 8:5,20; Radak ad loc.). This motivation made their desire for a king contemptible (Sanhedrin 20b; Sh'muel I, 8:7-8; cf. D'varim 17:14-15), despite the fact that, according to some opinions, there is a biblical obligation to appoint a king (see the dispute in ...


6

So I found that MhrSh"A and Eyun Jacob each offer answers. MhrS"A says that David saw her thigh from 3 parasangs away. So she did not do it in front of him, rather it was a more incidental occurence. Abigail probably thought that she was sufficiently secluded. E"J says that Abigail, sensing the tension between her husband Nabel and David, uncovered herself ...


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