10

I asked this question to one of my Rabbeim when I was a teenager. His response was "We do not want to finish an Aliya with the name of an Avoda Zara וַנֵּשֶׁב בַּגָּיְא מוּל בֵּית פְּעוֹר therefore Levi goes until Sheni and then we give the Yisrael from there".


10

In order for the Torah Shebal Peh to be "added" to the Torah it would be necessary to conclude from independent evidence that it wasn't part of the Torah to begin with. To argue that Torah Shebal Peh is not divine because it was "added" is to either argue in a circle or merely beg the question. The verse does not proscribe adding to the "written" Torah but ...


9

Rabbi Samson Raphael Hirsch's book Horeb divides the commandments into six categories: Torot (teachings) - fundamental principles relating to mental and spiritual preparation for life Edot (testimonies) - symbolic observances representing truths which form the basis of Israel's life Mishpatim (ordinances/judgements1) - declarations of justice towards human ...


9

The Sefer Hachinuch interprets this verb as the source that the commandment stated here is to believe in God, and not merely to profess belief in God. His piece on Commandment 417 begins: מצות אחדות השם - שנצטוינו להאמין כי השם יתברך הוא הפועל כל המציאות, אדון הכל, אחד בלי שום שתוף, שנאמר (דברים ו ד) שמע ישראל יי אלהינו יי אחד, וזה מצות עשה הוא, אינה הגדה,...


7

The commentator Rashi explains that the reference is not to numbers, but to estimation: you regard yourselves as small, as, e.g., Abraham did who said, (Genesis 18:27) “For I am dust and ashes", and as, e.g., Moses and Aaron did who said, (Exodus 16:7) “And we, what are we?".


6

The words Shema Yisrael are usually translated as "Hear, Israel" or "Listen, Israel." However, the word appears with a different meaning elsewhere in Tanach: Shmuel 1 15:4: וַיְשַׁמַּע שָׁאוּל אֶת הָעָם, And Shaul gathered the nation Metzudas Tzion there: וישמע" - ענין אסיפה הבאה בשמיעת קול המאסף" Vayishama - gathering that happens through ...


6

R' Yaakov Kaminetzky discuses the opinion of Ramban in his Emes LiYaakov, parshas ViEschanan 4 19 on the verse וראית את השמש ואת הירח גו׳ אשר חלק ה׳ אלקיך אתם לכל העמים תחת כל השמים. He says there are two approaches to this passage amongst the mefarshim. Some say it means he gave the sun and moon for light, but don't worship them. Whereas Ramban and Ibn ...


6

Rashi and Ramban hold (citing Rabbi Yoshiyah in Sanhedrin 86a) that "lo tignov" in Shemot 20:13 means that one should not kidnap another person. Rashi's reasoning is that those who break the commandments of "lo tirtzah" and "lo tin'af" are subject to the death penalty, so it makes sense that one who breaks "lo tignov" also is subject to the death penalty. ...


5

In the first instance (hap-tip to Joseph for the list) of the use of "האל" in the Torah meaning "these," Bereishit 19:8, Rashi and Ibn Ezra comment on it, both indicating or implying that there's no special significance to this use. Skimming through the Mikraot Gedolot and R' Hirsch (commentaries I have at hand) on this and the other instances, I don't see ...


5

Those Chumashim are unfortunately mistaken. All old manuscripts of the Torah have listed that there are 119 verses (see clips from 8 of them here). If you count the Decalogue as 10 verses, as is read in Taam Elyon, then you get 119. Problem solved. (All those Mikraot Gedolot are probably just copying from Daniel Bomberg's edition which has this problem (...


5

The Minchas Shai does, he brings different readings and see from the words acher kach matzati B'Mordichai(pg 32) but better to see the whole thing. http://hebrewbooks.org/pdfpager.aspx?req=14036&st=&pgnum=32


5

Aside from the Seporno mentioned by Ezra, there a few other rishonim who also include monetary theft in Lo Signov. R. Saadia Gaon writes: לא תגנב לא תסרק R. Avraham Ben Harambam writes: פשטיה דקרא אזהרה על כל גניבה שיש בכלל אזהרה זו גניבת הממון וזולתו והקרקע וגניבת הנפשות ור' סעדיה ז"ל אמר שיש בכלל התראה זו גם גניבת ממון העשיר ויפה אמר והמעתיקים ...


4

First, a correction to the question. The Ramban does not say that Megillah is not a problem because it was instituted by nevi'im, rather he says that it is not a problem because a source was found within the Torah. See Ramban's hasagot to Sefer Hamitzvot, Shoresh 2: וכבר אמרו(מגלה יד.) ״ארבעים ושמונה נביאים ושבע נביאות עמדו להם לישראל לא פיחתו ולא הותירו ...


4

Often in Tana"ch, the word "Shema" doesn't mean "hear" - using ears. It means "understand". Example of this - Na'aseh V'nishma - the response B'nai Yisra'el gave upon accepting the giving of the Torah - means, "We will do, and we will understand". Talmud Brachot (don't recall exact page) mentions that the recital of the Shema is comparable to reciting the ...


4

This is found in the Midrash Aggada (ed. Buber) to Deuteronomy (3:23): ואתחנן. תקט"ו תפלות עשה על זה הדבר כמנין ואתחנן אעפ"כ לא קבל הקדוש ברוך הוא תפלתו Vaethanan: He prayed 515 prayers on this, like the numerical value of 'vaethanan' (ואתחנן), but nevertheless God did not accept his prayer. It is also found in Deuteronomy Rabba (ed. Vilna: 11:10), ...


4

In R' Samson Raphael Hirsch's commentary on Shemot 13:9, he distinguishes the functions of the two tefillin as: לְאוֹת עַל יָדְךָ - "a guide for all your acts" לְזִכָּרוֹן בֵּין עֵינֶיךָ - "the basis of all your thoughts" The tefillin serve as physical tokens of, respectively, our dedication of our actions (hand) and our thoughts (head) to God. In turn, ...


4

From R. Ovadya of Bertinoro's Amar N'ke commentary to Rashi here, it is apparent that Rashi did mention all three! He discusses why Rashi lists the three in the order that he does: favour, free gifts, and land. Clearly his version of Rashi had all three. The following is his initial quotation of Rashi which includes all three: לא תחנם לא תתן להם חן. ד"א ...


3

The Meshekh Hokhmah (Deuteronomy 11:31) answers that before the land was apportioned into tribes, the mitsvah of settling the land of Israel included Transjordan. Accordingly, Moshe already fulfilled this mitsvah.


3

In the Maharal From Prague's Hagada, he goes into detail regarding the 4 sons – why there are 4 sons; the reason each son's question is what it is – and then he explains the reason for the answers of each son. (Including, why the naïve's question and answer are the same as in the Torah.) Since I couldn't find The Maharl's Hagada on the web, I typed up the ...


3

I'm not aware of any references in the Chumash itself, but the only two passages in the entire Tana'kh that may be relevant to your question, to my knowledge, are (JPS): Yeshayahu 40:22 "It is He that sitteth above the circle of the earth." (Rashi links this verse to 44:13, which speaks of a carpenter using a "compass") Iyov 26:7 "He stretcheth out the ...


3

I can give a partial answer regarding the statutes and ordinances - in Hebrew "Chukim Umishpatim" A statute is a law that has no "logical" reasoning for example, the laws of kashrut (kosher) are not based on human "logic". We cannot logically reason why we cannot eat shellfish, for example. An oridnance - "mishpat" is something that we can logically ...


3

You need to read the Mechilta: "לא תחמוד בית רעך" - כלל. "ועבדו ואמתו ושורו וחמורו" - פרט. כלל ופרט - אין בכלל אלא מה שבפרט. וכשהוא אומר Once the passuk says "anything that is to your friend," what need is there for the previous items mentioned? I can only assume this is a prat u'klal setup --> RIGHT But it is a kelal ufrat ukhlal "וכל אשר לרעך"...


3

According to R' Samson Raphael Hirsch, in his commentary on this verse: The first part of the verse enjoins us from falling into the trap of being so overcome by the number, size, and brilliance of the celestial objects that we ascribe to them powers of their own, and worship them. Instead, we must recognize that they're all members of the natural order ("...


3

I do not believe the Torah is putting forth a proof of its own truth. The passuk is telling us that we should consider these acts of God, which have not been claimed anywhere else, as a demonstration of God's greatness over all other forces. The miracles are assumed to be true, and we need a refresher of how to view them and appreciate what it means. As a ...


2

Quoting Natan Slifkin's essay "The Sun's Path at Night": ...from both general history as well as the interpretations of the Geonim and Rishonim, the view of the Sages of Israel was that of ancient Babylonian cosmology. They believed that the earth is a roughly flat disc, and the rest of the universe is a hemispherical solid dome ...


2

In addition to @SabbaHillel's answer, this site appears to show streams flowing into the Dead Sea from all directions:


2

The map on page 923 showing the borders of Eretz Yisrael does not show that line. It appears to be an artifact of the cut and paste method used to create the map or of the boundary line between the east and the west in order to show the three cities of refuge on each side.


2

Rabbi Nathaniel Helfgot explains that the Ramban is only bothered by Purim because it was an institution of the Nevi'im - prophets. What does Rashi mean? A simple understanding of his words would seem to indicate that he doesn't believe that Chanuka presents a problem, since its source is not a takanat nevi'im. Only a mitzva which is introduced as falling ...


2

לא תתאוה refers simply to having a desire. לא תחמד refers to not only desiring someone's stuff but acting on that desire to actually get it. If one takes it from him forcefully, he's violated the third aveirah of לא תגזול. And if he's not careful and lets his desire for the property get away from him, he might c"v end up violating לא תרצח as well. ...


2

There are at least two opinions that differentiate halachically between the two terms: The Rambam in M.T. (Gzeilah 1:9-10) and Shulchan Aruch (C.M. 359) hold that לא תתאוה refers to plotting to acquire the coveted item, while לא תחמד refers to actually pressuring the owner into giving it to him. The Sefer Hachinuch (417) (and perhaps the Rambam in Sefer ...


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