16

HaSeder Ha'aruch (134:9-13) collects several answers to this question: The wise son says "אתכם" since he did not personally hear the command, and he is referring to the generation which left Egypt. Since he mentions Hashem -"Which the L-rd, our G-d has commanded" he is not excluding himself. However, the wicked son who does not mention Hashem in his words ...


16

The Mishnah cites eating in haste as one of the few differences between the paschal offering that first year and that of subsequent years. The modern Passover meal is modeled primarily on the latter.


16

Shulchan Aruch, OC 473:7, gives instructions for what to do if by yourself, from which we see that that's a possibility.


15

Here are some more simple ones: גפן. קידוש. [נר. הבדלה.] זמן. נטילת. ירקות. אדטה. וטבל. בצע. עניא. כסא. ונשתנה. נטילת. שלימה מוציא. ופרוס אכילת עמה. חסא. מרור. טבל. כרך. וסעד. בצוע. מפטיר. ונוטל. שלישי למזון ורביעי להלל.‏ (Machzor Vitri) קר״י חכמ״ה בי״ן המל״ך אמ״ן = קדוש רחיצה ירקות. חולק כהא מזוג הגדה. ברכת יין נטילה. המוציא מצה לטיף כריכה. אפיקומן ...


13

A colleague of mine reminded me that there is actually a Gemara in Berachos 44b that describes a young healthy goat as a 'bar zuza', meaning it costs one zuz. He explained that although Chad Gadya states that the goat was bought for 2 zuz, there are major commentators (see Haggados of the Vlna Gaon and Chasam Sofer) that explain that the repetition of "Chad ...


13

The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


11

A vegetable dish that makes a nice presentation is stuffed peppers. I like to cut them in half, so there's more room to pile on the filling. When I shop, I try to find peppers with 4 sides rather than 3, so they'll lay flat. You can use any mixtures of cooked vegetables, such as mushrooms, onions, carrots, etc., with or without quinoa, and with or without ...


10

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


10

According to Jastrow, the word כרפס refers to an umbelliferous plant (one that has stalks branching out from a common stem, forming a flat or curved surface), like parsley or celery. It is not clear what the word's etymology is, or whether or not it is related to its homonym, כרפס, which turns up in Tanakh. That word, appearing in Esther 1:6, refers to a ...


10

In Israel, only the first night is a full holiday, and as such, the Seder is only ever on the first night. In the Diaspora, both the first and second nights are full holidays. The Seder should be done on both nights. If, for some reason, someone is really only able to do one of them, it should be the first. This is because the first night is a Biblical ...


10

TLDR: The Talmud's preferred plant for Maror is lettuce-like and leafy. In cold climates people started using horseradish root because it was still too cold to grow leafy plants at Pesach time, and if you put together the right combination of opinions you can construct an argument that horseradish root fulfills the Mitzva. The argument isn't particularly ...


10

The Mishna in Pesachim 2:5 reads as follows: אלו דברים שאדם יוצא בהן ידי חובתו בפסח: בחיטים, בשעורים, בכוסמין ובשיפון ובשיבולת שועל These are the things with which a person may discharge his obligation on Pesach: wheat, barley, spelt, rye and oats. [Note that these are the commonly accepted translations of the five grains. As mentioned by Dan F in ...


9

It's virtually impossible to compare money from such a long time ago. Common comparisons are: Value of precious metal. Cost of a days meal. Days labor. Each measure will give you a different number. For a goat probably a days labor is the best measure, since that's what you would have to do to get one. A day laborer (unskilled) in those days would earn ...


9

Some highlights (you can glean this by simply reading Mishna Torah, but of course you have to compare it to a regular seder): Say a Bracha Achrona on the wine after every cup (at least according to this) Say a Bracha when washing before Karpas. Latter day practice has been to not say a bracha in deference to Tosfos opinion. Dip the Karpas in Charoses, not ...


9

Enlightened by the approaches taken in other answers and encouraged by the large number of views, I suggest this analysis as an answer to my own question. There is agreement on the web that dressed weight is about 50% (e,g, sites below). There is less agreement on the weight of a lamb of a year of age or under. This site gives the weight of lambs at 12 ...


9

An ex-Christian once described to me the seder that her church did when she was growing up. It was adapted from the haggadah, the text that we Jews use, but it had some Christian overlays. I don't know if all Christian seders do this; from the description in the question it sounds like this is not uncommon. Adding Christian symbolism or theological claims ...


9

In her book about the family heritage, Shulamit Soloveitchik Meiselman writes this exact story about her great-grandfather¹, Rav Yoshe Ber Soloveitchik². Also known as the Beis HaLevi. The book is titled: The Soloveitchik Heritage: A Daughter's Memoir (the story begins towards the bottom of page 57) I couldn't select the words to copy, so here are ...


9

Many laws applied to the Passover offering that do not apply to the Seder. For example, the Passover offering can only be eaten by people who are Tahor (a specific form of ritual purity). There is no requirement to be Tahor to attend a Seder nowadays. Similarly, the Passover offering had to be eaten only by the invited members of a group. Nowadays, anyone ...


8

Just to add to @Michoel's answers I have my own thought. Have a look at the Posuk by the Chacham, it says there, when your son will ask you. By the Rasha however, it says when when he will tell you. There is a famous story of an Apikores who told a Gadol that he had many questions on Judaism. The Rov told him he can answer questions, but he cant answer ...


8

Food writer Dan Pashman, this past Thanksgiving, wanted to invent a vegetarian dish that would be as special as a whole roast turkey, or even a turducken, in terms of requiring so much preparation and so many eaters that one would only do it for special occasions. He came up with the Veggieducken, a very large, stuffed squash. The only ingredient in the ...


8

The Magen Avraham (OC 474:1 and similarly in Taz there) explains that each of the four cups is a separate mitzva, and it is therefore considered as if he had in mind specifically not to exempt the other cups with his Brocha. The Pri Megadim adds that it is preferable to actually have this in explicitly in mind. The Minchas Shlomo (vol. 1 18:6) questions ...


8

The sefer "HaSeder HaAruch" (vol. 2 chapter 129) brings several answers to this question: Moshe did not accomplish the desired goal of the Exodus from Egypt. The actual redemption was only brought about through the plague of Death of the Firstborn, which was executed by Hashem Himself, and not through Moshe, as we say in the Haggadah "I, and not the ...


8

I'll deal with one potential aspect of your question, and hopefully others will be able to add more: to what extent are the questions in Mah Nishtanah answered within the text of Mah Nishtanah itself? This issue is discussed at length by Prof. Richard C. Steiner of Yeshiva University, in an article titled, "On the Original Structure and Meaning of Mah ...


8

There's a Jewish Diabetes Association - guide for diabetics that puts out a list of the minimum shiurim; normally we say "oh play it safe and eat a larger amount of matza/wine just to be safe", but for those with medical conditions, we can safely follow the opinions that a much smaller measure is required. Obviously, if someone just can't do it, they just ...


8

I've turned the chair sideways (i.e., the chair back is perpendicular to the table), draped a pillow over the back and leaned my hand over the pillow and the back. Don't use a high-back chair for this. A short chair or folding chair will work fine for this purpose. Another easy solution is just lean your elbow on the table. I have seen a number of ravs I ...


8

Menachem Ben Yashar provides a fascinating answer here, very summarized as follows: The Yerushalmi's version was written during the time of the Beis Hamikdash, and thus, there was a real Halachic concern that the Ben Tipesh would not only not learn anything, but break the Halachos of Pesach. For that reason, we teach him a practical Halacha, with a clear ...


8

Mishnah Pesahim 10:3 states: הביאו לפניו מצה וחזרת וחרוסת ושני תבשלין They bring before him matzah, lettuce, haroset and two cooked dishes. As we will see, these 'two cooked dishes' are what we now know as the zero'a (shank bone) and beitzah (egg) that are commonly found on the seder plate. Talmud Bavli Pesahim 114b clarifies: מאי שני תבשילין ...


8

The Gemara (Pesachim 114b) tells us what different amora'im held one should eat in fulfillment of the two cooked dishes, and so obviously there are kosher alternatives (though maybe not the option of rice if you have a custom not to eat it). But even if there are alternatives, wouldn't it be better to consider learning the significance of the egg instead of ...


8

Rashi himself asks your question on Pesachim 119b! His answer (quoting a principle of Rav Chisdah regarding maror from Pesachim 115a) is: לאחר שמילא כריסו הימנו היאך חוזר ומברך עליו After he has filled his stomach with it, how can he then go and make a blessing on it? The idea seems to be that although the main mitzvah of matzah is performed with ...


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