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16

HaSeder Ha'aruch (134:9-13) collects several answers to this question: The wise son says "אתכם" since he did not personally hear the command, and he is referring to the generation which left Egypt. Since he mentions Hashem -"Which the L-rd, our G-d has commanded" he is not excluding himself. However, the wicked son who does not mention Hashem in his words ...


16

The Mishnah cites eating in haste as one of the few differences between the paschal offering that first year and that of subsequent years. The modern Passover meal is modeled primarily on the latter.


13

Similar to what @ShmuelBrin said, but on more of a psychological level: As brought by theyeshiva.net, The Maharal of Prague (Gevurot Hashem 61) explains what happened when the Jews left Egypt: The Exodus of Egypt, he suggests, was not merely a political and geographical event, in which slave laborers were allowed to leave a country and forge their own ...


13

The Encyclopaedia Judaica, cited in the Wikipedia article linked in the comments above, states as follows: Eḥad Mi Yode'a is first found in Haggadot of the 16th century and only in those of the Ashkenazi ritual. Many scholars believed that it originated in Germany in the 15th century. Perles showed its similarity to a popular German pastoral song, "Guter ...


13

Here are some more simple ones: גפן. קידוש. [נר. הבדלה.] זמן. נטילת. ירקות. אדטה. וטבל. בצע. עניא. כסא. ונשתנה. נטילת. שלימה מוציא. ופרוס אכילת עמה. חסא. מרור. טבל. כרך. וסעד. בצוע. מפטיר. ונוטל. שלישי למזון ורביעי להלל.‏ (Machzor Vitri) קר״י חכמ״ה בי״ן המל״ך אמ״ן = קדוש רחיצה ירקות. חולק כהא מזוג הגדה. ברכת יין נטילה. המוציא מצה לטיף כריכה. אפיקומן ...


12

A few ideas: Get into "round-table" discussions related to the Exodus somehow, in which everyone is encouraged to voice their opinions on the subject at hand. For example, citing the midrash about how the redemption was deserved by the Jews for not changing their "Jewish" attire and names can incite a socio-historical discussion about the role of ...


12

The gemara (P'sachim 119b) mentions the prohibition of eating after the the final matzah (which is known nowadays as the afikoman). There are different opinions among the poskim as to the reason for this. The Rashbam (ad loc., s.v. אין מפטירין אחר המצה אפיקומן) writes that the reason is to prevent attenuating the taste of the matzah, which is eaten as a ...


12

A colleague of mine reminded me that there is actually a Gemara in Berachos 44b that describes a young healthy goat as a 'bar zuza', meaning it costs one zuz. He explained that although Chad Gadya states that the goat was bought for 2 zuz, there are major commentators (see Haggados of the Vlna Gaon and Chasam Sofer) that explain that the repetition of "Chad ...


11

You need a more precise translation. Had God not taken us out of Egypt, then we, our children, and grandchildren would have been indebted to Pharaoh. Hebrew me-she-ubad, as used regarding real estate on lien for paying potential debts. Had things worked out for our release in other fashions, we would have still owed Pharaoh one. Only by the dramatic show ...


11

Strangely enough, I have found that those who aren't interested will tend to go with the flow if you state from the outset that you're going to read through the Hagadah. It will be dry. It may be boring. But if they are mature enough (not particularly opposed to ritual, and your question implies that they are not), just give everyone a Hagadah and say you're ...


11

Report This "answer" records what I did this year and how it worked out. I drew from several suggestions in other answers here. Some context: the two seders had different but overlapping groups of attendees. One has always been a "when do we eat?" seder; the other spends more time but replaces a lot of the traditional content with other readings and ...


11

A vegetable dish that makes a nice presentation is stuffed peppers. I like to cut them in half, so there's more room to pile on the filling. When I shop, I try to find peppers with 4 sides rather than 3, so they'll lay flat. You can use any mixtures of cooked vegetables, such as mushrooms, onions, carrots, etc., with or without quinoa, and with or without ...


10

We were at the 49th rung of impurity. We were already idolaters. 4/5 of the Jews didn't want to leave. If we would have waited a little more we would have gotten to the 50th rung which means we would have been too far gone. The Lubavitcher Rebbe explains that is why we had to run out of Egypt. The evil was still strong and we went out only because of ...


10

Shulchan Aruch (OC 476:2) writes that those who have the custom not to eat roasted meat on the Seder nights refrain from eating any type of meat that requires slaughtering, including chicken. Although the Korban Pesach could not be offered from such meat, we are still concerned people may come to permit other types of roast. However fish meat is ...


10

According to Jastrow, the word כרפס refers to an umbelliferous plant (one that has stalks branching out from a common stem, forming a flat or curved surface), like parsley or celery. It is not clear what the word's etymology is, or whether or not it is related to its homonym, כרפס, which turns up in Tanakh. That word, appearing in Esther 1:6, refers to a ...


10

In Israel, only the first night is a full holiday, and as such, the Seder is only ever on the first night. In the Diaspora, both the first and second nights are full holidays. The Seder should be done on both nights. If, for some reason, someone is really only able to do one of them, it should be the first. This is because the first night is a Biblical ...


10

TLDR: The Talmud's preferred plant for Maror is lettuce-like and leafy. In cold climates people started using horseradish root because it was still too cold to grow leafy plants at Pesach time, and if you put together the right combination of opinions you can construct an argument that horseradish root fulfills the Mitzva. The argument isn't particularly ...


10

The Mishna in Pesachim 2:5 reads as follows: אלו דברים שאדם יוצא בהן ידי חובתו בפסח: בחיטים, בשעורים, בכוסמין ובשיפון ובשיבולת שועל These are the things with which a person may discharge his obligation on Pesach: wheat, barley, spelt, rye and oats. [Note that these are the commonly accepted translations of the five grains. As mentioned by Dan F in ...


9

Machzor Vitry (sec. 65) attributes them to Rashi. This site says that it has also been attributed to R. Shmuel of Falaise, one of the Tosafists (mid-13th century), but that the true authorship is unknown. (It was actually originally just one of a lot of mnemonics for the order of the Haggadah composed by various rishonim. Another one, from Maharam ...


9

It's virtually impossible to compare money from such a long time ago. Common comparisons are: Value of precious metal. Cost of a days meal. Days labor. Each measure will give you a different number. For a goat probably a days labor is the best measure, since that's what you would have to do to get one. A day laborer (unskilled) in those days would earn ...


9

Some highlights (you can glean this by simply reading Mishna Torah, but of course you have to compare it to a regular seder): Say a Bracha Achrona on the wine after every cup (at least according to this) Say a Bracha when washing before Karpas. Latter day practice has been to not say a bracha in deference to Tosfos opinion. Dip the Karpas in Charoses, not ...


9

Enlightened by the approaches taken in other answers and encouraged by the large number of views, I suggest this analysis as an answer to my own question. There is agreement on the web that dressed weight is about 50% (e,g, sites below). There is less agreement on the weight of a lamb of a year of age or under. This site gives the weight of lambs at 12 ...


9

In her book about the family heritage, Shulamit Soloveitchik Meiselman writes this exact story about her great-grandfather¹, Rav Yoshe Ber Soloveitchik². Also known as the Beis HaLevi. The book is titled: The Soloveitchik Heritage: A Daughter's Memoir (the story begins towards the bottom of page 57) I couldn't select the words to copy, so here are ...


9

Many laws applied to the Passover offering that do not apply to the Seder. For example, the Passover offering can only be eaten by people who are Tahor (a specific form of ritual purity). There is no requirement to be Tahor to attend a Seder nowadays. Similarly, the Passover offering had to be eaten only by the invited members of a group. Nowadays, anyone ...


8

It seems like you wanted some practical tips. I have run many successful sedarim with differently engaged Jews. There are a couple of things that I do to engage people who may not be initially interested in sharing their thoughts. Go around the table and have everyone finish a sentence "slavery is..." "freedom is..." Do some prep work and print out a ...


8

I think if people go into it with the attitude that they're going to be bored and it's just a ritual, don't try shoving things down their throats. One gimmick might be to "beep" out anyone if they mention Moshe's name (the original haggada made a point of leaving it out; we've since thrown in a paragraph in which it pops up once). Another idea is to outline ...


8

There are a couple of things that I do to engage people who may not be initially interested in sharing their thoughts. Go around the table and have everyone finish a sentence "slavery is..." "freedom is..." Do some prep work and print out a different quote for each person at the table. It can be from literature, torah, art whatever. Last year I chose ...


8

The דרכי משה ( in אורח חיים ס' תעד ס'ק יח ) brings the custom based on the מהרי'ל and the custom of the מהר'ש. He also states that the מהר'ש based it on the ספר אבי'ה - presumably the ראבי'ה. There are two things being symbolized. The use of the finger symbolizes the 'finger of G-d' and the number of times has a gematria of 16. The דרכי משה explains ...


8

DailyHalacha.com says that the reciting of the Hagadah is based on ‘VeHigadata LiBincha BaYom HaHu Lemor.’ The Ritvo and the Gr"a had only the head of the household read it. Rabbi Mansour's custom however, is that all recite the Hagadah together word by word. From time to time they pause the reading, and the Ba’al Habayit or somebody that is fluent in the ...


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