Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange
22

God's further comments in Genesis 17 and 21 clarify that Isaac is the sole descendant who would be the bearer of the covenant. (See, for example, 21:12 and 17:19-21.)


20

The reason we have double parshiyos in the first place is in order to satisfy the four basic rules (given in Shulchan Aruch, Orach Chaim 428:4) about the distribution of parshiyos throughout the year. In particular, the first two are: that the Shabbos before Pesach has to be Parshas Tzav in a regular year, or Metzora in a leap year; and that the Shabbos ...


19

On that gemara, artscroll notes Although on the surface this verse discusses the Babylonian exile, which ended long before the time of Rav Yehudah and R Abba, Rav Yehudah understood it as referring to the Jewish people throughout all their various exiles, and as containing a commandment for them to remain in the Diaspora until God gathers them ...


15

On the airplane there: be courteous to the other passengers and the flight crew. Pray in your seat, standing only when the fasten-seatbelt light is turned off! Some broad outlines: As you allude to in your question, except possibly on certain joyous days, your tear your clothes the first time you visit the kosel hamaaravi; some do also when they first see ...


15

No. See the following list from the Rambam of what Mashiach will/must do: In the future, the Messianic king will arise and renew the Davidic dynasty, restoring it to its initial sovereignty. He will build the Temple and gather the dispersed of Israel. Then, in his days, the observance of all the statutes will return to their previous state. We will ...


15

Mechilta Drav Yishmael - Yisro - Parsha 5 says that it was not given in Eretz Yisroel in order that the non Jews would not to be able to say that they did not accept it since it was given in the Jewish land. Another reason was to avoid a dispute between the Shevatim. ומפני מה לא ניתנה תורה בארץ ישראל? שלא ליתן פתחון פה לאומות העולם, לומר: לפי שנתנה תורה ...


15

Judaism doesn't have a current pilgrimage obligation the way I understand that Islam does (I believe every Muslim is required to go to Mecca once). However, Israel and, more specifically, Jerusalem is very important to Jews; Israel is our homeland, and Jerusalem is the site of the temples (past and future). Further, Jerusalem used to be a pilgrimage ...


14

Besides the main issue of God's explicit identification of Isaac for this inheritance, already conveyed in DoubleAA's answer, note that Islam is a belief system whose creation came way after the events described in Genesis, and one that doesn't have any special status in Judaism. Therefore, it's impossible that Judaism would consider the subject of verses in ...


13

Here is every occurrence of the phrase in Tanach: Samuel I 13:19 Kings II 5:2 Kings II 5:4 Kings II 6:23 Ezekiel 27:17 Ezekiel 40:2 Ezekiel 47:18 Chronicles I 22:2 Chronicles II 2:16 Chronicles II 30:25 Chronicles II 34:7


13

The Chinuch, in his introductory letter, breaks it down like this (apparently differently than the Chofetz Chaim): There are 613 Mizvot, 248 Positive and 365 Negative. (The Chinuch bases his sefer on the Rambam's enumeration of the Mitzvot.) The Total amount of Mitzvot that a person can do these days is 369, however 99 of them (78 Positive and 21 Negative), ...


13

Is there anything wrong with this? Nope. The Rambam wrote a unique halacha (Melachim 5,10): "Great Rabbis would kiss the ground of Eretz Yisrael, and kiss its stones as well as roll in its dust as it states: because your slaves wanted its stones and begged for its dust." (from here) The Talmud records that Rabbi Abba would demonstrate his great love ...


13

No, and I'll explain why: First, as per this list, only 42.5% of world Jewry was in Israel in 2010, so "most" of the Jews are not in Israel. Second, the exile is a function of lost spirituality, not just physical presence. The return to Zion will end the exile when god decides we are on the spiritual level for the proper return. Simply moving there, while ...


13

The front is the seal of the State of Israel. The Hebrew on the back is a verse from Ruth (Ruth 3:10) which means "You are blessed to G-d, my daughter" which were words that Boaz said to Ruth when she asked him to marry her. It doesn't have an official name; it is a thoughtful trinket.


12

Nitei Gavriel cites sources that say that in that case the people in Eretz Yisrael indeed start saying Pirkei Avos on Shabbos the 22nd of Nissan and continue from there, so that they recite the sixth chapter on the sixth Shabbos of the Omer. For the seventh Shabbos, then, they study the first chapter of Maseches Derech Eretz Zuta. (He actually says ויש ...


12

Bartenura (to Megillah 1:1) says that it is associated with Yehoshua because he was the first to wage war against Amalek. Indeed, G-d directs Moshe there to "write this as a memorial in the book and place it in the ears of Yehoshua" - the Gemara (Megillah 7a and 18a) explains that this phrase refers, among other things, to the Megillah.


12

Nit'ei Gavriel (Pesach 108:5) states, as Dan mentioned in his comment, that in Eretz Yisrael in such a case they read it on the first day of Pesach, and in chutz la'aretz they do so on the eighth day.


12

Note 10 in Rav Eliezer Melamed's article on the "lighter fasts" states as follows: וכיום ההוראה הרווחת לנשים אשכנזיות שלא לצום. ועיין בפסקי תשובות תקנ, א, שהביא דעות מופלגות להיתר, שכל הנשים הראויות לילד פטורות מהצום, כדי שיהיה להן כוח לילד. ויש אמרו שתפדה את הצום בצדקה. ע"כ. ואין נוהגים להורות כמותם, אבל במקום ספק אפשר לצרף את דבריהם להיתר.‏ ...


12

While there are various other answers to this question, I will highlight a few of them: One simple answer is that Moshe wanted to see the land, and this is what Rashi (Devarim 3:27) suggests: וראה בעיניך – בקשתה ממני: ואראה את הארץ הטובה (דברים ג׳:כ״ה), אני מראה לך את כולה, שנאמר: ויראהו י״י את כלא הארץ (דברים ל״ד:א׳). וראה בעיניך [LIFT UP THINE ...


11

See: http://savethekinneret.com/ (chart is a bit messy, though) http://www.israelweather.co.il/kineret.asp (in hebrew)


11

Ramban on the verse I mentioned (Ex. 3:8) offers two possibilities: It simply means that the land is "wide" enough to accommodate the entire Jewish people. (This is especially so in light of the Gemara's statement (Gittin 57a) that Eretz Yisrael "expands" when Jews are settled in it.) It is a land that contains "wide" plains and valleys and lowlands, rather ...


11

Kesuvos 111b: (Art Scroll 11b5) has the following: Rami bar Yechezkel traveled to Bnai Brak. He saw certain goats that were eating under the fig trees, and [fig] honey dripped from the figs while milk dripped from [the udders of] these [goats] and [the two] mixed together [to form a flowing stream]. [Rami bar Yechezkel] said This is a [literal] ...


10

It's actually if Israel has the majority of the world's Jewish population, not just a plurality. The figures in your second link have 42.5% in Israel vs. 57.5% outside of it - so we're not quite there yet. (There is also, of course, the difficulty of determining who is a halachic Jew, ואכמ"ל.) Anyway, Yovel (and Shemittah, according to some posekim) depends ...


10

One reason taught to me is that there is still work to be done in the Diaspora. You must take into account the contribution you can make and are making to the Jews in your country of origin, and what effect its loss might have on them. I remember my Rosh Yeshivah pointing out to us that Yeshivah bochurim are special and valuable members of the community. ...


10

There is also the halachic opinion of Rav Yehudah, quoted in several places in the Gemara (Berachos 24b, Shabbos 41a, Kesubos 110b-111a) that it is in fact forbidden to move from Bavel to Eretz Yisrael. He bases this on his understanding of Jer. 27:22 ("they shall be brought to Bavel, and there they shall remain until the day I am mindful of them"), plus ...


10

Here is a posting giving the reason that the Rebbe stated. Why didn't the Rebbe ever visit Israel? by Rabbi Naftali Silberberg [It is important to note that since the Rebbe took leadership of the Chabad movement in 1951, he never took a day off, and never traveled outside of New York.] There are several possible reasons for why the Rebbe never ...


9

Amman has never been under Jewish rulership (it was the capital of the Ammonite kingdom). By contrast, Eilat (or neighboring Etzion Gever) was controlled by Shlomo (I Kings 9:26), Yehoshafat (ibid. 22:49), and Uzziah (II Kings 14:22) - it was permanently wrested away only in Achaz's times (ibid. 16:6) - so there is much more reason to consider it part of ...


9

http://chareidi.org/archives5761/korach/KRfeatures.htm While our rabbis tell us that davening at kivrei tzaddikim is a segulah for all types of help, the tradition of Amuka as an address for unmarried men and women is a relatively new one, according to experts in the field. It was "rediscovered" about fifty years ago by Rav Shalom Gefner of Meah ...


9

There is a concept from the Gemara (Pesachim 8a) known as שלוחי מצוה אינן ניזוקין - mitzva messengers are not harmed. When one is going on a trip that involves potential risks, some are of the custom is to give them a small amount of money to give to charity at their place of destination, so that they are effectively turned into "mitzva messengers" until ...


9

Your premise is that God forced Moshe to go up the mountain and look at the land in some torturous fashion, driving home the point that he would never enter it. I believe this is an incorrect premise. We can see from several of the commentaries that going up to the mountain to see the land was something positive, and perhaps even something that Moshe asked ...


8

It's not really a contradiction. The ban wasn't everlasting (i.e. it didn't extend to the end of time and resurrection), but precluded Moshe Rabbeinu from entering Israel in his lifetime. The Midrash Rabbah tells us that Moshe did not enter the land for the sake of the generation that died in the desert. Midrash Rabbah V'Eschanan (words in brackets my ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible