58

The civil date line doesn't affect the Halachic day with regards to Shabbos. Where is the location date line is subject to Halachic argument According to the Chazon Ish, the Halachic dateline hugs the coast of Australia, China and Russia. Anything to the east (Japan, etc) is considered to be on the same day as the United States. Therefore, it's Shabbos in ...


28

The question of where the Halachic International Dateline is is its own independent question. The decision in Samoa would only matter if we left date-line issues to governmental/secular authorities, which is not the case. The day to keep Shabbos in Samoa would be seven days from the last time it was to be kept, according to which ever opinion we should/do go ...


21

It seems The Star K picked up on the question: How to Keep This Shabbos in Samoa? STAR-K Tells Us How (Samoa & Tokelau To Cross International Date Line)


21

The Gemara in Avoda Zarah (41a) says: כדור שתופש את עצמו תחת כל העולם כולו ככדור It [The Idol] holds a ball as if to say it rules over the entire world like a ball Tosfos explains why a ball is used as the imagery of ruling over the world (S.V K'kadur) says: ככדור. שהעולם עגול כדאיתא בירושלמי שאלכסנדרוס מוקדון עלה למעלה עד שראה כל העולם ...


15

Per the OU Daf HaKashrus Volume 15 No 6 dated March 2008 this question was answered by Rabbi Gersten as follows "In a near sea level environment water boils at 212 degrees Fahrenheit. at higher elevations water boils at lower temperatures. In Denver for example the average boiling temperature is 202 degrees Fahrenheit. when Hagalah is performed in high ...


15

Mechilta Drav Yishmael - Yisro - Parsha 5 says that it was not given in Eretz Yisroel in order that the non Jews would not to be able to say that they did not accept it since it was given in the Jewish land. Another reason was to avoid a dispute between the Shevatim. ומפני מה לא ניתנה תורה בארץ ישראל? שלא ליתן פתחון פה לאומות העולם, לומר: לפי שנתנה תורה ...


14

Rabbi Moshe Tendler says that the principle of "as it absorbs, so it exudes" (k'bol'o kach polto) means METHOD of absorption, not temperature. Fire kashering for things that became unkosher through dry heat (roasting, grilling) and boiling for liquids. His example was that a spoon that became unkosher on a camping trip to the Dead Sea through immersion in ...


14

You may be referring to a comment by the Rashash, who in turn explains a comment by Rashi on B'rachos 8a (s.v. כפיטורי בפי ושט). Rashi says: ים אוקיינוס יש בו מקומות שאינו מקבל ברזל ומחברין לוחי הספינה ע"י חבלים ועקלים שתוחבי' בנקביו ותוקעין אותו בדוחק לפי שהם גסין כמדת הנקב My translation: There are places in the ocean that do not tolerate iron, and ...


12

Bartenura (to Megillah 1:1) says that it is associated with Yehoshua because he was the first to wage war against Amalek. Indeed, G-d directs Moshe there to "write this as a memorial in the book and place it in the ears of Yehoshua" - the Gemara (Megillah 7a and 18a) explains that this phrase refers, among other things, to the Megillah.


12

At the core of your question is the assumption that the flood and its fallout was natural, and was subject merely to the laws of nature as we see them today. For the purposes of this answer I will not accept that premise, however I think that one can still reconcile the evidence we see nowadays with the flood in a cogent way that draws upon the natural ...


11

Ramban on the verse I mentioned (Ex. 3:8) offers two possibilities: It simply means that the land is "wide" enough to accommodate the entire Jewish people. (This is especially so in light of the Gemara's statement (Gittin 57a) that Eretz Yisrael "expands" when Jews are settled in it.) It is a land that contains "wide" plains and valleys and lowlands, rather ...


11

The Ritva writes (Rosh Hashana 11a): ויומי ניסן לאו דוקא אלא כל מקום ומקום לפי מה שהוא דמלבלבי.‏ "The days of Nissan" is not precise, but rather every place according to when the trees bud. Based on this, Rabbis Yitzchok Yaakov Weiss (Minchat Yitzchak 10:16) and Tzvi Pesach Frank (Har Tzvi OC 118) ruled that in the Southern Hemisphere the blessing ...


10

Targum Pseudo Jonathan to Genesis 2:15, ודבר השם אלקים ית אדם מן טור פולחנא אתר דאתבריא מתמן ואשריה בגינוניתא דעדן...‏ And God took Adam from the mountain of worship, the place from which he was created, and put him in the Garden of Eden Pirush Yonatan says this refers to mount Moriah, the Temple Mount Targum Pseudo Jonathan Genesis 22:2, ...


10

According to Shmuely Wollenberger in The Coffee Room at The Yeshiva World Rabbi Schachter held it was forbidden. Rav Schachter and his wife used to go for walks on Shabbos. They would cross part of the George Washington bridge then stop and turn around because the bridge is farther than the T'chum. From Gershon Dubin at http://www.ottmall.com/...


10

Halachic Yerushalyim is indeed still the same size (eg. for Maaser Sheni purposes). Shushan Purim is celebrated both in an ancient walled city and "adjacent" to it (Megilla 2b).


10

Dr. Leiman writes on the mouse that is 'half-mouse-half-earth" that, (p.452): "... it comes as no surprise that the rabbis discussed the status of a creature they had never seen, and one that modern scholarship would label as imaginary. The greatest scientists and historians of their day took its existence for granted. If so, its halakhic status needed to ...


9

This affects when Shabbat and yom tov start and end and when you can perform time-bound mitzvot. There are various opinions (some collected here), so this is something you need to consult your rabbi on. Opinions cited there include: use the times for your home city (if you're visiting); use 6PM; use the point when the sun is at its lowest in the sky. I ...


9

The main text, Hekhalot Rabbatai can be found translated online with notes as to where to find printed Hebrew editions (the most often cited sefer is batei midrashot by Wertheimer). There is not a firm consensus among scholars as to when it was written but there is general agreement to a range of 200-800 C.E. Souce. I have not found a source that discusses ...


9

I live in Sydney Australia and I can say definitively that yes the custom is to stay up all night and learn on Shavuot night. I have never heard the suggestion that staying up all night is related to the time of sunrise/sunset at that time of year. I have many friends in South Africa and can say that they have the same custom as well. My inclination is that ...


9

My rabbinic sources in Rome tell me that there is no written source, but that this is local minhag. --SF


9

See this comprehensive and well sourced paper on the topic by one of our site regulars. Cush was the son of Cham, and the grandson of Noah (Exodus 10:6), and according to the Midrash (Genesis Rabbah 36:7), he was cursed by his grandfather to be dark-skinned. In terms of the location of the land of Cush, he writes: "Cush" is commonly translated as ...


9

I gave a Shiur on this last year. Here is my summary of the reasons to be lenient. Much of this is based on a piece in קובץ פרי תמרים אדר תשמ"ז by Rav Ezriel Kahn. (Its also worth looking up the תשובה מאהבה חלק א' סי' ר"י.) 1) Rav Chaim Kanievsky - Because of the changing of the tides and shorelines and the like we don’t really know whether it was ...


9

It branches off the Jordan river, running eastward through Gilead, just north of Mt Nebo and to the south of the Bashan. Today it is known as the Wadi Zerqa ("Blue River"). See the maps on pages 38 and 115 of Anson Rainey and Steven Notley, The Sacred Bridge (Jerusalem: Carta, 2006), and the information in Randall W. Younker, "Jabbok" in Anchor Bible ...


8

Ramban (to Deut. 11:29) suggests that Mt. Gerizim is to the south and Mt. Eival to the north (which indeed is geographically true - presumably he had the chance to verify this firsthand when he moved to the Land of Israel at the end of his life), and in biblical geography the north is often identified with evil (as in Jer. 1:14). (Furthermore, throughout ...


8

According to this site: Magen Shalome, built by Shalome Solomon Umerdekar and his son Gershone Solomon, Karachi’s last synagogue, was demolished in the 1980s to make way for a shopping plaza. Most of the Karachi Jews now live in Ramle, Israel, and built a synagogue they named Magen Shalome. Some Jewish families do remain, but they prefer to pass ...


8

Dr. Steven Fine, my Classical Jewish History prof at YU, wrote in this year's Tisha Bav To-Go (published by YU's CJF) the following: For centuries, Jews avoided the Arch of Titus, refusing to walk under it and thus to give honor to Titus. The Arch symbolized the debasement of Judaism and the beginning of our woes. This situation was reinforced by ...


8

Additionally, it was given in the desert (no-man's land) so that no people would be able to claim that they have no share in the Torah. (See English comments in the Stone Chumash; I can't give a more specific reference because I don't have the book on my lap ATM, sorry). edit: Mekhilta De-Rabbi Ishmael (Exodus 19:2).


8

Yoni beat me to it, but I found a source if you'd like one: the Targum on Tehillim 83:7 translated "הגרים" as "הונגראי". The term is used so often all over Jewish literature to refer to Hungary though that a source isn't really needed. (In fact, the translation offered by Targum there is highly unlikely to be correct; just thought it was a cool tidbit)


8

The source of the name Maaras Hamachpeila could shed some light on this question. - According to one opinion in Eiruvin 53a, either Rav or Shmuel (the Gemara doesn't say which one said it) says the cave is named because it is "doubled with couples" i.e. there are many couples there. This would seem to imply that its main significance is who is buried there. ...


7

The St. Louis [Missouri] Community Eruv includes portions of either side of Interstate 170.


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