10

Sefer HaChinuch #16 explains breaking bones was the way of the poor and at the table of the seder we act as free and wealthy men (e.g., reclining) For it is not honorable for the sons of kings and the advisers of the land to drag the bones and break them like dogs. Except for the impoverished among the people and the starving, it is not a proper ...


7

(Pesudo)-Malbim in Midrash Haggadah advances the following theory. This passage originated in the Babylonian Exile (and thus is in Aramaic) and was recited on the afternoon before Pesach. It was meant as an invitation to paupers to join one's seder that evening, and consisted of the phrases: הָא לַחְמָא עַנְיָא דִּי אֲכָלוּ אַבְהָתָנָא בְאַרְעָא ...


5

The Rishonim dispute whether Hillel would wrap the Korban Pesach together with the Matza and Maror(Rashi Pesachim 115a s.v. Shehaya and Rashbam ad. loc. s.v. Korchan) or eat the Korban Pesach separate from the Matza and Maror (Rambam Hilchot Chametz Umatza 8:6-7, Rabeinu Chananel ibid). This dispute accounts for the variations in the text of Zecher Lemikdash ...


4

The Darkei Moshe (Rema) Orach CHaim 475,10 writes about the zeroa see points below for summary: כתב מהרי"ו בדרשותיו שצריך לצלות הזרוע והביצה מבע"י דהואיל שאינו אוכלו בי"ט אסור לצלותו בי"ט ונראה דאם רוצה לאכלו בי"ט ראשון ולעשות אחרות לליל י"ט שני דרשות בידו ואז יוכל לצלות אף בי"ט הואיל שאכלו באותו יום ולא כתב מהרי"ו אלא לפי המנהג שנוהגים להשהותו עד ליל ב': ...


4

Mishna Berura 473.4 sk 32 (לב) וכן נוהגין בעירנו - לצלות הביצה. ואסור לאכול הזרוע בלילה דאין אוכלין צלי בלילה אבל הביצה אף שהיא צלויה מותר שאין איסור צלי בביצה ולפ"ז אסור לצלות הזרוע בלילה אלא מבעו"י אם לא שדעתו לאכלו למחר באותו היום וע"כ אם שכח וצלאו בלילה יזהר לאכלו מחר בבקר כ"כ המ"א ושארי אחרונים ואם דעתו שלא לאכול הביצה עד ליל ב' גם הביצה אסור לצלותה ...


3

Intuitively, I expect that your first source is referring to a class of animals that's generally worshipped by a society, while your second source is referring to a particular animal that's been worshipped by individual worshippers.


3

The Kollel Iyun HaDaf writes here the following: There are two exceptionally short pages (Amudim) of Gemara in Pesachim (57b and 99a) due to the printers' addition of extensive Halachic summaries of the laws of the Korban Pesach (on 57b) and of the Korban Pesach Sheni (on 99a). The earliest printed, full edition of the Talmud (Venice, 1522) did not include ...


3

For what it's worth, my Oz V'hadar Mesivta Haggadah, extended edition, does indeed include it in brackets (p. 57). In their discussion of the Minhag (p. 309) they reference the Ma'aseh Rav (§190), which lists the passages which the Gra would say. As you note, he leaves out the passage from Ezra. They pose this question (ad. loc., ft. 4) in the name of ...


3

Chabad.org has an article titled "The Shank Bone (Zeroah)" that addresses this custom: (also referenced in the comments by @Yishai) Since the zeroa symbolizes the Paschal sacrifice, which was roasted, the custom is that the zeroa is roasted as well. However, since it is absolutely forbidden to sacrifice outside of the Temple Mount, and we do not want it ...


2

According to the Sifri Bamidbar 6,22 Moshe kept on pushing off the Temeim (ritually impure people) by saying that they simply were not obligated at all to bring the Pesach Offering since they were Tamei minority and were exempt. Only certain men (see Pesachim 6a who exactly these men were) argued to Moshe that Pesach offering could be brought from a Kal ...


2

The Rambam Hilchos Korban Pesach 3,2: באומר לעבדו צא ושחוט עלי וקבע לו ושכח העבד מה אמר לו רבו. והוא שיתן לו רועה של רבו גדי וטלה ויאמר לו שחוט שניהן כדי שתשחוט כמו שאמר לו רבך והרי אחד מהן שלך על מנת שלא יהיה לרבך בו כלום. אם עשה הרועה כך אחר כך יהיה אפשר לעבד להתנות כמו שביארנו When someone tells his slave to slaughter a Pesach offering and the ...


2

Building on the previous answer, there were a lot of knives needed and not a lot of time available. As the question goes on to ask, we see that the mikdash had the resources to provide everyone with bowls, poles, cups, and so on to do the other steps, so why not knives? Well, to start with, bowels, poles, and cups are reusable, while knives are not until ...


2

As a practical matter each group had to bring a valid shechitah knife so that they could shecht the korban pesach on time. The knives at the bais hamikdash, besides not being enough for everyone, would have had to have been inspected before each shechitah. If people had not brought their own knives, many would not have been able to get the slaughtering done ...


2

Joel K suggested in the comments that, in fact, you're not allowed to put the Chagiga on the table with the Pesach lechatchila, for this reason. The Rambam relies on the other places where he paskens that אין מביאין קדשים לבית הפסול, such as Chagiga 2:13. Double AA supported this with a diyuk from the Rambam's language: for the Chagiga he says שעלה, ...


2

In fact, the Chofetz Chaim (Likkutei Halachos, Pesachim) is quoted to the effect that the custom can't override the mitzvah, and that the fat should be eaten. (The relevant volume of Likkutei Halachos doesn't seem to be available on Hebrewbooks, unfortunately.) ומשמע מהרמב״ם דא״צ רק לשייר הגיד ולא השומן,‏ דמותר לאכול שמנו של גיד בקדשים,‏ דאין מנהג בזה לעבור ...


2

Minchat Chinuch 8 suggests that maybe the prohibition to leave over from the korban only applies to those parts of it which are fit to be eaten. The fat of the gid hanashe is not fit to be eaten (due to custom) and therefore the prohibition to leave over does not apply to it. However, he ultimately moves away from this approach, as it is diffcult to ...


1

Sefer HaChinuch 13 defines what is meant by an apostate: שלא נאכיל מן הפסח לישראל מומר לעבודה זרה We may not feed meat of the Pesach offering to a Jew who has apostatized to idol worship. (In this he is following the ruling of Rambam in Hilchot Korban Pesach 9:7.) It's worth pointing out that Minchat Chinuch suggests that one who desecrates shabbat may ...


1

The explanation of [Rei 16:2] is brought to include both the korbon Pesach (flock) and the korbon Chagigah (herd). We know that the Korbon Pesach must only from the flocks (sheep and goats). Thus, herds must refer to a different korbon. As translated You shall slaughter the Passover sacrifice to the Lord, your God, [of the] flock, and [the Festival ...


1

Ben Ish Chay (Tzav 30) says not to eat it the first night or day of Pesach, but that you can roast it on Pesach anyway if you forgot to do so before Pesach. He implies that his responsum collection Mikavtziel may explain why, but I don't have a copy or see one online.


1

R. Ovadiah miBartenura explains that this mishnah is discussing a case where the korban pesach became impure or left Jerusalem on the fourteenth of Nissan. In such a case, it is burnt immediately on the fourteenth of Nissan. It cannot, however, be burnt at any time on the fifteenth, as it is forbidden to burn invalid sacrifices on Yom Tov. This is in ...


1

I just thought of this answer: The commandment to bring the Pesach the second year starts with: וְיַעֲשׂ֧וּ בְנֵי־יִשְׂרָאֵ֛ל אֶת־הַפָּ֖סַח בְּמוֹעֲדֽוֹ׃ The Jewish people should bring the Pesach at its proper time. Rashi says (from Sifri, which elaborates a lot more) "במועדו" אף בשבת, "במועדו" אף בטומאה ‏ "at its proper time"...


1

As a simple answer, these two mitzvos are two ways of disassociating from the Egyptians: Milah is a permanent, irreversible change to your body. The Pesach is a permanent social change. Once you sacrifice the Egyptians' god, they won't accept you anymore. Once these mitzvot formed the basis of Jewish identity in Egypt, not doing them is like removing ...


1

Here is a wonderful Shiur at Olamot that addresses all that you asked. In short, it's a Machlokes why the Afikoman is eaten during the Seder, either because it is a Zecher of the Korban Pesach, or that it is part of the Chiyuv to eat Matzah, or because Chazal wanted the taste of Matzah to remain in our mouths. Over time, it seems to have become a weird ...


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